The University of Southampton
Biological Sciences
Phone:
(023) 8059 3349
Email:
K.T.Jones@soton.ac.uk

Professor Keith T Jones BSc, PhD

Head of Biological Sciences, Professor of Cell Biology, Principal Investigator (Meiosis & cell cycle)

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Professor Keith T Jones is Head of Biological Sciences within the Centre for Biological Sciences at the University of Southampton.

Career history

2013-present: Head of Biological Sciences. University of Southampton, UK.
2013-present: Professor in Cell Biology. University of Southampton, UK.
2008-present: Conjoint Professorship. Chinese Academy of Sciences. Institute of Zoology.
2013-present: Adjunct Professor of Physiology. University of Newcastle. Australia.
2008-2012: Professor in Human Physiology. School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, & Co-Director of the Priority Research Centre  in Reproductive Biology, University of Newcastle, Australia.
2005-2008: Personal Chair in Reproductive Physiology. Institute for Cell and Molecular Biosciences, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
2005: Reader in Reproductive Physiology. Institute for Cell and Molecular Biosciences, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
2002-2005: Senior Lecturer. Institute for Cell and Molecular Biosciences, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
1998-2002: Lecturer. Department of Physiological Sciences, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK
1997-1998: Senior Research Fellow. Department of Anatomy & Developmental Biology, University College London, UK.
1994-1997: Non-Clinical Scientist Grade 1. MRC Experimental Embryology & Teratology Unit, George's Hospital Medical School, London, UK.

Academic qualifications

1994: PhD. University of Liverpool, UK.
1989: BSc Biochemistry (First Class Honours). University of Leeds, UK.

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Research

Publications

Teaching

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Research interests

Oocytes are large single cells that have been used in many aspects of cell biology to uncover how cells work. My laboratory is concerned with how the process of meiosis happens in order to produce a healthy mature egg that is capable of being fertilized by the sperm at fertilization. In many species including our own meiosis lasts decades because it is punctuated by a protracted arrest in prophase. Hormonal signals cause meiotic resumption and completion of the first meiotic division, and the oocyte is then ovulated arrested at metaphase of the second meiotic division. A calcium signal at fertilization drives completion of the second meiotic division. We are concerned with the events going on inside the oocyte that are responsible for these stops and starts of the cell cycle. 

Prophase I arrest. This cell cycle arrest of the oocyte is equivalent to the G2/M transition of somatic cells. What are the events inside the oocyte triggering this process?

Meiotic maturation and segregation of chromosomes. Mis-segregation of chromosomes in meiosis I is common and leads to aneuploidy. Why is aneuploidy so common in oocytes and why does it increase with a women's age?

Intracellular signals at fertilization. Here we are concerned with uncovering the signal transduction processes responsible for waking up the egg from its cell cycle arrest at metaphase of the second meiotic division.

DNA damage. We want to find out how oocytes respond to DNA damage: their capacity to repair damage, the pathways they utilise to repair damage, and the consequences on the embryo if DNA is not properly repaired. 

Meiotic maturation and segregation of chromosomes. Mis-segregation of chromosomes in meiosis I is common and leads to aneuploidy. Why is aneuploidy so common in oocytes and why does it increase with a women’s age?

Intracellular signals at fertilization. Here we are concerned with uncovering the signal transduction processes responsible for waking up the egg from its cell cycle arrest at metaphase of the second meiotic division.

PhD Supervison
Josie Collins: DNA damage repair in mouse oocytes. University of Southampton.
Larissa Zarate-Garcia: Understanding the mechanisms of meiotic arrest in mouse oocutes due to environmental insults. University of Southampton.
Yan Yun: Meiosis control during segregation of bivalents. Australian Research Council.

Research group(s)

Biomedical Sciences

Affiliate research group(s)

Institute for Life Sciences (IfLS)

Article(s)

Book Section(s)

Teaching contributions

BIOL2017 Pharmacology B
BIOL3031 Literature based Research Projects
BIOL3032 Literature based Research Projects
BIOL3006 Cellular and Genetic Aspects of Animal Development
BIOL2018 Adaptive Physiology
BIOL6013 Advanced Research Project
BIOL1020 Core Skills in the Life Sciences

Professional Affiliations

BBSRC Pool of Experts
BingZhi Honorary Professorship, Chinese Academies of Sciences; Institute of Zoology.
Conjoint Professorship in Reproductive Physiology; University of Newcastle Australia.

Professional Membership

Membership of the Faculty of 1000
Member of the Cell Biology Faculty
Editorial Board Membership of: Scientific Reports; Molecular Human Reproduction; Reproduction;
Developmental Biology.
Member of the Equality and Diversity Committee for Biological Sciences

Professor Keith T Jones
Head of Biological Sciences and Professor of Cell Biology Room 3007 Life Sciences Building 85 Centre for Biological Sciences Faculty of Natural and Environmental Sciences Highfield Campus University of Southampton Southampton SO17 1BJ UK

Room Number: 85/3001

Telephone: (023) 8059 3349
Email: K.T.Jones@soton.ac.uk

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