The University of Southampton
Courses

HLTH6175 Human Factors and Decision Making in Major Trauma Care

Module Overview

Trauma care is a high-risk, high-hazard job. Ambient noise and distractions competing priorities coupled with acute, ambiguous, and rapidly evolving scenarios contribute to the “organized chaos” that defines modern trauma care. Effective team-based skills can mitigate the extent to which these human, situational, and environmental factors influence the clinical care of patients. Decision making is integral to the way that we manage ourselves, team members, and patients and their families during emergency situations. It is essentially the ability to translate knowledge of what needs to be done into effective actions during a crisis situation. This module will enable you to study the factors, human and non-human, which impact on quality in trauma care. You will critically evaluate the literature and demonstrate the ability to apply theoretical models of understanding to improve your decision making in safe trauma care practice

Aims and Objectives

Module Aims

This module will enable you to: 1. Critically review the notion of human factors in trauma care and their impact on safety, systems and clinical outcomes 2. Critically analyse the ways in which both clinical and non-clinical information is gathered and processed through assessment. 3. Critically evaluate the literature on theories and models of the human processing of data and information for the purposes of judgement, diagnosis and decision making, with reference to error, heuristics and bias. 4. Critically appraise your ability to lead, follow and work in, a team with reference to personal and situational awareness. 5. Critically consider the role of feedback, reflection, Morbidity and Mortality review and other quality mechanisms in the evaluation of performance and improvement of both clinical outcomes and the trauma service as a whole.

Learning Outcomes

Learning Outcomes

Having successfully completed this module you will be able to:

  • Critically review the notion of human factors in trauma care and their impact on safety, systems and clinical outcomes
  • Critically analyse the ways in which both clinical and non-clinical information is gathered and processed through assessment.
  • Critically evaluate the literature on theories and models of the human processing of data and information for the purposes of judgement, diagnosis and decision making, with reference to error, heuristics and bias.
  • Critically appraise your ability to lead, follow and work in, a team with reference to personal and situational awareness.
  • Critically consider the role of feedback, reflection, Morbidity and Mortality review and other quality mechanisms in the evaluation of performance and improvement of both clinical outcomes and the trauma service as a whole.

Syllabus

• Human and non-human factors • Safety and systems • Teamwork and leadership • Quality and review • Models and theories of decision making from assessment, through processing and judgment to decision making in trauma care • Gathering processing and interpreting data/information: clinical and non-clinical • Processing data for diagnosis • Clinical reasoning • Error, bias, heuristics • System failure • Investigating serious incidents and near misses • Type I and II thinking • Models of clinical decision making

Learning and Teaching

Teaching and learning methods

The focus will be on considering episodes of clinical care and critically evaluating/ unpicking the sequence of events as they happen. Methods will include consideration of previous practice, filmed practice, simulations and reflections on episodes of care. Students will be facilitated to study the literature and apply it to the actual or filmed vignettes of trauma care.

TypeHours
Completion of assessment task90
Preparation for scheduled sessions100
Follow-up work20
Lecture20
Tutorial10
Wider reading or practice10
Total study time250

Resources & Reading list

Emergency Medicine Taskforce Interim Report: Executive Summary.

Hicks C (2015). Crisis Resource Management Training in Trauma. 

Key Websites.

Standing M (2010). Clinical Judgement and Decision-Making in Nursing and Interprofessional Healthcare. 

Online journals.  • The Journal of Trauma • The Journal of Trauma Practice • Trauma Quarterly • Journal of Emergency Medicine, Trauma and Acute Care • The Journal of Literature and Trauma Studies Oxford: Open University press

Croskerry P (2002). chieving quality in clinical decision making: cognitive strategies and detection of bias. Academic Emergency Medicine. ,9 , pp. 1184-1204.

Key Websites.

Marsden J, Newton M, Windle J and Mackway Jones, K (Advanced Life Support Group) (2015). Emergency Triage: Telephone Triage and Advice (Advanced Life Support Group). 

Bolton G (2010). Reflective Practice: writing and professional development. 

Key Websites.

Braude H (2012). Intuition in Medicine: A Philosophical Defense of Clinical Reasoning. 

Helbrock M and Jerin J M (2011). Sick Not Sick: A Guide to Rapid Patient Assessment (Continuing Education Series) (EMS Continuing Education). 

Patel V L, Kaufman D R and Coben T (2013). Cognitive Informatics in Health and Biomedicine: Case Studies on Critical Care, Complexity and Errors (Health Informatics). 

Assessment

Formative

Test

Summative

MethodPercentage contribution
Essay  (2000 words) 60%
Presentation  (20 minutes) 40%

Referral

MethodPercentage contribution
Essay  ( words) 100%

Repeat Information

Repeat type: Internal & External

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