The University of Southampton
Courses

PSYC6115 Adapting Clinical Work for Different Populations

Module Overview

Clinical work often has to be adapted to meet the needs of different populations. This module will provide you with an overview of some of the reasons why we have to adapt the delivery of specific interventions initially through a developmental perspective and individual differences perspective. The module will cover both adapting individual therapeutic interventions to meet the needs of specific populations (e.g. the elderly) and will also look at other ways of delivering interventions (e.g. through carers and staff). The module will make explicit links to other modules such as the CBT module, for example by looking at attachment theory and inviting you to consider how disrupted attachment could contribute to the development of personality disorders.

Aims and Objectives

Module Aims

This module will provide you with an overview of some of the reasons why we have to adapt the delivery of specific interventions initially through a developmental perspective and individual differences perspective.

Learning Outcomes

Learning Outcomes

Having successfully completed this module you will be able to:

  • Know how development through the lifespan affects the presentation of different clinical disorders with a specific focus on adults of working age and beyond
  • Understand how individual differences impact on clinical disorders
  • Be able to critically appraise the literature supporting interventions for different populations using guidance frameworks such as NICE and SIGN
  • Evaluate theory-practice links in the application of psychological interventions to a range of different populations
  • Reflect on your clinical practice with at least one group of patients who require adaptations to standard delivery of therapy

Syllabus

The syllabus is organised around a number of different but related areas: Why we might need to adapt psychological interventions • Developmental perspective including attachment, life-stages and ageing • Psychology of individual differences (including models of personality, emotion and motivation) Working with different groups and adapting interventions • Older adults • Physical health and impact on psychological functioning • Long-term conditions • People with addictions • Forensic populations • Working with race, culture and diversity • Multidisciplinary work • Working with carers Ethical issues related to adapting clinical practice • Ethical issues working with older adults • Monitoring and evaluating ethical practice when other people are delivering an intervention (e.g. staff teams, carers) • Ethical issues around working with forensic populations

Special Features

Teaching will be delivered by clinicians who are experts in their field. Service users and carers will be involved in teaching

Learning and Teaching

Teaching and learning methods

Teaching will comprise a number of different methods including lectures, seminars, problem-based learning, e-learning, directed reading, and independent study. Skills-based competencies will be taught through demonstrations, simulated role plays, and using multi-media resources

TypeHours
Teaching40
Independent Study60
Total study time100

Resources & Reading list

Laidlaw, K. & Knight, D (2008). Handbook of emotional disorders in later life: Assessment and treatment. 

Llewelyn, S. and Kennedy, P. (2003). Handbook of clinical health psychology. 

Kennedy, P (2012). Oxford Handbook of Rehabilitation Psychology. 

Shankar, R (2009). Developing Cultural Competence in Clinical Psychology Work with BME Communities in (eds.) H. Beinart, P. Kennedy & S. Llewelyn Clinical Psychology in Practice.. 

Shankar, R (2009). Developing Cultural Competence in Clinical Psychology Work with BME Communities in (eds.) H. Beinart, P. Kennedy & S. Llewelyn Clinical Psychology in Practice. 

Kennedy, P and Llewelyn, S. (2006). Essential of Clinical Health Psychology. 

Blackburn,R. (2000). The Psychology of Criminal Conduct. 

Howitt, D. (2002). Forensic and Criminal Psychology. 

Lago, C. (Ed) (2011). The Handbook of Transcultural Counselling and Psychotherapy. 

Kennedy, P. (2007). Psychological Management of Physical Disability. 

Fairburn, C.G., Cooper, Z., & Shafran, R. (2003). Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for eating disorder: a “transdiagnostic” theory and treatment.. Behav Res Ther. ,41 , pp. 509-528.

Laidlaw, K, Thompson, L.W., Dick-Siskin, L., Gallagher-Thompson, D., (2004). Cognitive Behaviour Therapy with Older People. 

Woods, R. & Clare, L (2008). Handbook of the clinical psychology of ageing. 

Waller, G., Cordery, H., Corstorphine, E., Hinrichsen, H., Lawson, R., Mountford, V., & Russell, K (2007). Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for eating disorders: A comprehensive treatment guide. 

Blackburn,R. (2000). The Psychology of Criminal Conduct. 

Ayers, S., Baum, A., McManus, C. and Newman, S. (2007). Cambridge Handbook of Psychology Health and Medicine. 

Kouimtsidis, et al (2007). Cognitive Behavioural Therapy in the Treatment of Addiction: A treatment planner for Clinicians. 

Lago, C. (Ed) (2011). The Handbook of Transcultural Counselling and Psychotherapy. 

Howitt, D. (2002). Forensic and Criminal Psychology. 

Waller, G., Cordery, H., Corstorphine, E., Hinrichsen, H., Lawson, R., Mountford, V., & Russell, K. (2007). Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for eating disorders: A comprehensive treatment guide. 

Assessment

Summative

MethodPercentage contribution
Formulation and Intervention 100%

Repeat Information

Repeat type: Internal

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