The University of Southampton
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SESS1015 Basic Naval Architecture

Module Overview

This module will provide you with an introduction to the fundamental properties of floating bodies, covering those areas conventionally treated by hydrostatic methods and will provide students with an early insight into the range of tasks involved in the design, construction, management and operation of marine vehicles and an awareness of the engineer's responsibility to society.

Aims and Objectives

Module Aims

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Learning Outcomes

Knowledge and Understanding

Having successfully completed this module, you will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

  • The concepts of area, first and second moments of area and their applications to floating bodies.
  • The concepts of equilibrium and changes in equilibrium of floating bodies.
  • The concepts of static and dynamic stability
  • The use of numerical methods for calculating hydrostatic properties.
  • The different types of marine vehicles and identify characteristics influencing their design. (T, D, AC).
  • The fundamental engineering and economic principles, their application to design and their influence on the development of marine vehicles. (T, D, AC)
  • The role and responsibilities of engineers in society. (T)
Subject Specific Intellectual and Research Skills

Having successfully completed this module you will be able to:

  • Understand the basic principles of equilibrium of floating bodies.
  • Calculate relevant hydrostatic properties using theoretical and numerical methods.
  • Appreciate the technical and economical complexities involved in the design, construction, management and operation of marine vehicles. (T, D, AC)
Transferable and Generic Skills

Having successfully completed this module you will be able to:

  • Learn through tutorials and begin to learn independently.
  • Problems involving changes of draught and trim.
  • Numerical integration.
  • Initial transverse stability.
  • Virtual centres - suspended weights, free surface, stability during docking.
  • Large angle stability - GZ curves and effects of changing hull geometry.
  • Dynamic stability - effect of sudden loads, stability criteria.
  • Flooding calculations - added weight, lost buoyancy, floodable length, permeability.
  • Launching calculations and curves.
  • Inclining experiment.
  • Obtain and accurately analyse data applying your knowledge/understanding of this module
  • Communicate accurately your work in a written report
  • Team working through laboratory experiment.
  • Ship geometry - lines plan, curve of areas.
  • Ship parameters - form coefficients, fineness coefficients.
  • Equilibrium of floating and submerged bodies - volume, centres of buoyancy and gravity
  • Properties of irregular shapes - areas, first moments, second moments
  • Longitudinal and transverse metacentres.
Subject Specific Practical Skills

Having successfully completed this module you will be able to:

  • Use basic mathematical techniques, such as integration, to formulate and obtain hydrostatic properties of simple geometries
  • Use basic numerical methods, such as Simpson's rule, to formulate and obtain hydrostatic properties of hull forms.
  • Use simple measurement techniques to obtain data.
  • Perform independent/directed research. (T, D, AC)
  • Communicate accurately your work in written reports and assignments. (T, D, AC)

Syllabus

• Introduction to transportation of goods by sea. • Introduction to different types and classifications of marine vehicles and their roles. • Introduction to the ship design process and the naval architect’s role within it. • Introduction to the economics and financial aspects of ship design, construction and operation. • The role and responsibilities of the engineer in society and the business and social consequences of engineering decisions. • A brief history of the development of naval architecture as an engineering science. • Introduction to the leisure industry. • A look at the future of the maritime industry. • Ship geometry - lines plan, curve of areas. • Ship parameters - form coefficients, fineness coefficients. • Equilibrium of floating and submerged bodies - volume, centres of buoyancy and gravity. • Properties of irregular shapes - areas, first moments, second moments. • Longitudinal and transverse metacentres. • Problems involving changes of draught and trim. • Numerical integration. • Initial transverse stability. • Virtual centres - suspended weights, free surface, stability during docking. • Large angle stability - GZ curves and effects of changing hull geometry. • Dynamic stability - effect of sudden loads, stability criteria. • Flooding calculations - added weight, lost buoyancy, floodable length, permeability. • Launching calculations and curves. • Inclining experiment. • Analysis of the results of an inclining experiment to determine the centre of gravity. • Familiarisation with WUMTIA hydrostatics suite and its use to determine the GZ curve of a vessel.

Special Features

1) Visits to Portsmouth Dockyard: This allows several aspects of the module to be reinforced: • A visit to a warship. • A visit the dry docks and graving docks at the Naval Base. 2) Visit to cruise ship in Southampton: • Appreciate the complexity of design for large numbers of passengers. • Safety considerations. c) Ship stability. 3) Visit to RNLI, Poole: • Operational aspects of a large fleet of ships. • The ship simulator. • The training pool. 4) Visit to Southampton container port. This will enable students to appreciate the aspects of ship handling, ship cargo and trans-shipment

Learning and Teaching

Teaching and learning methods

Learning activities include • Lectures • Interactive tutorials • Directed reading • Example sheets • Experimentation • Report-writing (laboratory experiment)

TypeHours
Supervised time in studio/workshop6
Revision40
Preparation for scheduled sessions15
Tutorial15
Follow-up work5
Wider reading or practice10
External visits9
Seminar10
Completion of assessment task5
Lecture35
Total study time150

Resources & Reading list

Blackboard. The University Blackboard site for this module is extensively and continuously updated during the delivery of the module with incidents pertinent to the module.

Assessment

Assessment Strategy

Repeat year internally. Repeat year externally External repeat with components as follows: 1)Examination 60% ; 2) Submit technical report 20% 3) submit reports on both experiments with data provided by module lead: each worth 10%.

Formative

Quiz

Summative

MethodPercentage contribution
Essay 20%
Exam  (120 minutes) 60%
Inclining experiment 10%
Laboratory 10%

Referral

MethodPercentage contribution
Essay 20%
Exam  (120 minutes) 60%
Inclining experiment 10%
Laboratory 10%

Repeat Information

Repeat type: Internal & External

Linked modules

Pre-requisites - A levels in Mathematics and Physics or equivalent qualifications.

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