News release

Royal Society honour for Southampton scientists

Ref: 05_101

01 June 2005

Two University of Southampton scientists have been elected Fellows of the Royal Society.

Professor Harry Bryden of the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Professor Douglas Ross of the School of Physics and Astronomy, are among forty-four new Fellows elected this year. Fellows are elected for their contributions to science, both in fundamental research resulting in greater understanding, and also in leading and directing scientific and technological progress in industry and research establishments.

Harry Bryden is Professor of Physical Oceanography in the University's School of Ocean and Earth Science, where he has been teaching since 1995. Professor Bryden specializes in understanding the role of ocean heat transport in the global climate system and is known internationally for the outstanding contributions he has made through careful observation and innovative analysis and interpretation of data. His present research focuses on how the ocean circulation changes in a changing climate, with recent field expeditions across the Indian and Atlantic Oceans. A principal interest is to develop a system to monitor the Atlantic meridional overturning circulaton and ocean heat transport at 25°N as part of the Rapid climate change project.

'I never expected to be elected to the Royal Society,' he commented. 'In large part it is a tribute to a succession of talented and productive students and colleagues with whom I have worked over the past 25 years.'

Douglas Ross Professor of Physics at the University is distinguished for his contributions to the development and exploitation of gauge theories, both within and beyond the Standard Model of Particle Physics. His work has led to the understanding of the renormalization structure of spontaneously broken theories and to the theoretical properties of the perturbation series in non-Abelian theories.

Professor Ross, who has been at Southampton since 1980, obtained his Chair in 1993.
'To be elected a Fellow of the Royal Society is a great honour for any scientist,' he said.
'I am delighted and privileged that my work in the field of particle physics has been recognised with this Fellowship. I would like to thank my many colleagues with whom I have had the pleasure of collaborating, and who undoubtedly helped to make this possible.'

Images of both Professor Bryden and Professor Ross are available from Media Relations (023 8059 3212).


Notes for editors

  1. The University of Southampton is a leading UK teaching and research institution with a global reputation for leading-edge research and scholarship. The University has around 20,000 students and nearly 5000 staff. Its annual turnover is in the region of £270 million.