UK COVID Death in perspective

This page shows the death total in the UK compared to the sizes of UK cities (according to Wikipedia)

November 23rd
55836 dead in the UK from COVID-19
November 22nd
55721 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Ellesmere Port

Population 55715

Ellesmere Port /ˈɛlzmɪərpɔːrt/ is a large town and port in Cheshire, England, south of the Wirral on the banks of the Manchester Ship Canal. The town had a population of 55,715 in 2011. As well as a service sector economy, the town has retained large industries including Stanlow oil refinery, a chemical works and the Vauxhall Motors car factory. There are also a number of tourist attractions: the National Waterways Museum, the Blue Planet Aquarium and Cheshire Oaks Designer Outlet.

November 21st
55456 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Canterbury

Population 55240

Canterbury (/ˈkæntərbri/, /-bəri/, or /-bɛri/) is a historic English cathedral city and UNESCO World Heritage Site, which lies at the heart of the City of Canterbury, a local government district of Kent, England. It lies on the River Stour. The Archbishop of Canterbury is the primate of the Church of England and the worldwide Anglican Communion owing to the importance of St Augustine, who served as the apostle to the pagan Kingdom of Kent around the turn of the 7th century. The city's cathedral became a major focus of pilgrimage following the 1170 martyrdom of Thomas Becket. A journey of pilgrims to his shrine served as the frame for Geoffrey Chaucer's 14th century classic The Canterbury Tales. Canterbury is a popular tourist destination: consistently one of the most-visited cities in the United Kingdom, the city's economy is heavily reliant upon tourism. The city has been occupied since Paleolithic times and served as the capital of the Celtic Cantiaci and Jute Kingdom of Kent. Many historical structures fill the area, including a city wall founded in Roman times and rebuilt in the 14th century, the ruins of St Augustine's Abbey and a Norman castle, and the oldest extant school in the world, the King's School. Modern additions include the Marlowe Theatre and the St Lawrence Ground, home of the Kent County Cricket Club. There is also a substantial student population, brought about by the presence of the University of Kent, Canterbury Christ Church University, the University for the Creative Arts, and the Girne American University Canterbury campus. Canterbury remains, however, a relatively small city in terms of geographical size, when compared with other British cities.

November 20th
55212 dead in the UK from COVID-19
November 19th
54874 dead in the UK from COVID-19
November 18th
54487 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Christchurch, Dorset

Population 54210

Christchurch /ˈkraɪst.tʃɜːrtʃ/ is a borough and town on the south coast of England. The town adjoins Bournemouth in the west and the New Forest lies to the east. Historically in the county of Hampshire, it became part of the administrative county of Dorset in the 1974 reorganisation of local government. Covering an area of 19.5 square miles (51 km2), Christchurch had a 2011 population of 54,210, making it the fourth most populous town in Dorset, closely behind Weymouth which has a population of 54,539. Founded in the 7th century at the confluence of the rivers Avon and Stour which flow into Christchurch Harbour, the town was originally named Twynham but became known as Christchurch following the construction of the priory in 1094. The town developed into an important trading port and was fortified in the 9th century. Further defences were added in the 12th century with the construction of a castle which was destroyed by the Parliamentarian Army during the English Civil War. During the 18th and 19th centuries smuggling flourished in Christchurch and became one of the town's most lucrative industries. The town was heavily fortified during Second World War as a precaution against an expected invasion and in 1940 an Airspeed factory was established on the town's airfield which manufactured aircraft for the Royal Air Force. The town's harbour, beaches, nature reserves and historically important buildings have made Christchurch a popular tourist destination attracting some 1.5 million visitors a year. Bournemouth Airport, an international airport which handles approximately 800,000 passengers a year, is located within the borough boundary at Hurn. The airport's industrial park contains a number of aerospace and engineering businesses and is one of the largest employment sites in Dorset. Christchurch is a popular destination for retirees and has one of the oldest populations in the country with 30 per cent of residents aged over 65.

November 17th
54072 dead in the UK from COVID-19
November 16th
53668 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Deeside

Population 53568

Deeside (Welsh: Glannau Dyfrdwy) is the name given to a predominantly industrial conurbation of towns and villages in Flintshire close to the Wales–England border lying near the canalised stretch of the River Dee that flows from neighbouring Chester into the Dee Estuary. These include Connah's Quay, Shotton, Queensferry, Aston, Garden City, Sealand, Broughton, Bretton, Hawarden, Ewloe, Mancot, Pentre, Saltney and Sandycroft. The population is around 50,000, with a plurality (17,500) living in Connah's Quay. Although locally the term Deeside is usually only used to refer to Connah's Quay, Shotton, Queensferry, Garden city and the Deeside industrial estate. Deeside is known for its industry, providing jobs for the people of Cheshire, Merseyside & North Wales. The biggest employment area in Deeside is Deeside Industrial Park, located on the north bank of the Dee on the southern edge of the Wirral peninsula, which has both historical and contemporary significance, and provides Deeside and the surrounding area with jobs in many different industries from construction to food production. Deeside is also home to steel manufacturer Tata Steel, aircraft manufacturer Airbus and Toyota's highly advanced engine manufacturing plant.

November 15th
53270 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Hamilton, South Lanarkshire

Population 53188

Hamilton is a town in South Lanarkshire, in the west-central Lowlands of Scotland. It serves as the main administrative centre of the South Lanarkshire council area. It is the fourth-biggest town in Scotland. It sits 12 miles (19 km) south-east of Glasgow, 35 miles (56 km) south-west of Edinburgh and 75 miles (120 km) north of Carlisle, Cumbria. It is situated on the south bank of the River Clyde at its confluence with the Avon Water. Hamilton is the historical county town of Lanarkshire.

November 14th
52854 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Uxbridge

Population 52774

Uxbridge (/ˈʌksbrɪdʒ/) is a town in west London, England, and the administrative headquarters of the London Borough of Hillingdon. Fifteen miles (24.1 km) west-northwest of Charing Cross, it is one of the major metropolitan centres identified in the London Plan. Uxbridge historically formed part of the parish of Hillingdon in the county of Middlesex, and was a significant local commercial centre from an early time. As part of the suburban growth of London in the 20th century it expanded and increased in population, becoming a municipal borough in 1955, and has formed part of Greater London since 1965. It is a significant retail and commercial centre, and is the location of Brunel University and the Uxbridge campus of Buckinghamshire New University. The town is close to the boundary with Buckinghamshire, which is locally the River Colne. Several historical events have taken place in and around the town, including attempted negotiations between King Charles I and the Parliamentary Army during the English Civil War. The public house at the centre of those events, since renamed the Crown & Treaty, still stands. Uxbridge also houses the Battle of Britain Bunker, from where the air defence of the south-east of England was coordinated during the Battle of Britain. Situated in RAF Uxbridge, the No. 11 Group Operations Room within the bunker played a crucial rule during the battle and was later used during the D-Day landings. The wards of Uxbridge North and Uxbridge South are used for the election of councillors to Hillingdon Council and for statistical purposes. The 2011 Census recorded population figures of 12,048 for Uxbridge North and 13,979 for Uxbridge South.

November 13th
52453 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Altrincham

Population 52419

(For other uses, see Altrincham (disambiguation).) Altrincham (/ˈɒltrɪŋəm/ OL-tring-əm) is a market town in Trafford, Greater Manchester, England, south of the River Mersey about 8 miles (13 km) southwest of Manchester city centre, 3 miles (5 km) south-southwest of Sale and 10 miles (16 km) east of Warrington. At the 2001 UK census, it had a population of 41,000 increasing to 52,419 at the 2011 census. Historically part of Cheshire, Altrincham was established as a market town in 1290, a time when the economy of most communities was based on agriculture rather than trade, and there is still a market in the town today. Further socioeconomic development came with the extension of the Bridgewater Canal to Altrincham in 1765 and the arrival of the railway in 1849, stimulating industrial activity in the town. Outlying villages were absorbed by Altrincham's subsequent growth, along with the grounds of Dunham Massey Hall, formerly the home of the Earl of Stamford, and now a tourist attraction with three Grade I Listed Buildings and a deer park. Altrincham today is an affluent commuter town, partly because of its transport links. The town has a strong middle class presence; there has been a steady increase in Altrincham's middle classes since the 19th century. It is also home to Altrincham F.C. and three ice hockey clubs, Manchester Storm, Altrincham Aces and Trafford Tornados. Altrincham's population increased to 45,809 in 2011.

November 12th
52039 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Cheshunt

Population 51998

Cheshunt /ˈtʃɛzənt/ is a town in the Borough of Broxbourne, Hertfordshire, England with a population of around 52,000 according to the United Kingdom's 2001 Census. It is a dormitory town and part of the Greater London Urban Area and London commuter belt served by Cheshunt railway station. The town is located 13 miles (21 km) from Charing Cross, and 12 miles (19 km) from the City of London making it one of the closest parts of Hertfordshire to Central London.

November 11th
51633 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Barry, Vale of Glamorgan

Population 51502

Barry (Welsh: Y Barri) is a town in the Vale of Glamorgan, Wales, on the north coast of the Bristol Channel approximately 7 miles (11 km) south-southwest of Cardiff. Barry is a seaside resort, with attractions including several beaches and the resurrected Barry Island Pleasure Park. According to the 2011 census, the population of Barry was 51,502, making it the fifth largest town in Wales. Once a small village, Barry has absorbed its larger neighbouring villages of Cadoxton and Barry Island. It grew significantly from the 1880s with the development of Barry Docks, which in 1913 was the largest coal port in the world. The place was possibly named after Saint Baruc. However another explanation is that it comes from the Welsh "bar" meaning a hill or rise. Therefore the Welsh name, Y Barri, means The Hills. The first reference to it being named after St Baruc is from Giraldus Cambriensis (Gerald of Wales).

November 10th
51246 dead in the UK from COVID-19
November 9th
50866 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Clacton-on-Sea

Population 50548

Clacton-on-Sea is the largest town in the Tendring peninsula and district in Essex, England, and was founded as an urban district in 1871. It is a seaside resort that saw a peak of tourists in the summer months between the 1950s and 1970s. The town's economy continues to rely significantly on entertainment and day-trip facilities and it is strong in the service sector, with a large retired population. The north-west part of the town has two business/industrial parks. In the wider district, agriculture and occupations connected to the Port of Harwich provide further employment.

November 8th
50391 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Dunfermline

Population 50380

Dunfermline (/dʌnˈfɛrmlᵻn/; Scots: Dunfaurlin, Scottish Gaelic: Dùn Phàrlain) is a town and former Royal Burgh, and parish, in Fife, Scotland, on high ground 3 miles (5 km) from the northern shore of the Firth of Forth. The 2011 census recorded the town's population at 49,706, however figures released in 2012 estimate Dunfermline's population as 50,380, making it the largest locality in Fife and the tenth largest in Scotland. Until the 17th century, the town served as the royal capital of Scotland. The earliest known settlements in the area around Dunfermline likely date as far back as the Neolithic period. The area was not regionally significant until at least the Bronze Age. The town was first recorded in the 11th century, with the marriage of Malcolm III, King of Scotland, and Saint Margaret at the church in Dunfermline. As his Queen consort, Margaret established a new church dedicated to the Holy Trinity, which evolved into an Abbey under their son, David I in 1128. Following the burial of Alexander I, the abbey graveyard confirmed its status as the mausoleum of Scotland's kings and queens. The town is a major service centre for west Fife. Dunfermline retains much of its historic significance, as well as providing facilities for retail and leisure. Fife College have a campus at Halbeath, formerly Carnegie College. Employment is focused in the service sector, with the largest employer being Sky UK. Other large employers in the area include Amazon (on-line retailer), Best Western (hotels), CR Smith (windows manufacturing), FMC Technologies (offshore energy), Lloyds and Nationwide (both financial services). Dunfermline has experienced significant expansion since 1999, especially in an expansion corridor on the eastern side of the town. This growth has edged the population center towards the town's boundary with the M90 road corridor; it is planned to continue until 2022. Major developments include the creation of the Duloch and Masterton neighbourhoods with over 6,000 homes, three new primary schools, new community infrastructure, employment land and the Fife Leisure Park. With the expansion there has been a dramatic rise in the town's population; more than 20% over a 15-year period. Fife Council have begun drafting plans for an expansion of a similar scale on Dunfermline's south-west, west and north sides, which will see the creation of 4,000 homes, a new high school and three new primary schools in the first phase. The peacock is strongly associated with Dunfermline, and is considered a local icon. Linked to the town's Pittencrieff Park, free-range peacocks and peahens have had the freedom of Dunfermline since the 1900s. In 2014 the park became home to a peacock sanctuary.

November 7th
49981 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Dumfries

Population 49883

Dumfries (/dʌmˈfriːs/ dum-FREESS; possibly from Scottish Gaelic: Dùn Phris) is a market town and former royal burgh within the Dumfries and Galloway council area of Scotland. It is near the mouth of the River Nith into the Solway Firth. Dumfries was a civil parish and became the county town of the former county of Dumfriesshire. Dumfries is nicknamed Queen of the South. People from Dumfries are known colloquially as Doonhamers.

November 6th
49604 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Accrington

Population 49600

Accrington is a town in the Hyndburn borough of Lancashire, England. It lies about 4 miles (6 km) east of Blackburn, 6 miles (10 km) west of Burnley, 13 miles (21 km) east of Preston, 20 miles (32 km) north of Manchester city centre and is situated on the mostly culverted River Hyndburn. Commonly abbreviated by locals to "Accy", the town has a population of 45,600 according to the 2001 census and the urban area has a population of over 80,000. Accrington is a former centre of the cotton and textile machinery industries. The town is famed for manufacturing the hardest and densest building bricks in the world, "The Accrington NORI" (iron), which were used in the construction of the Empire State Building and for the foundations of Blackpool Tower; famous for Accrington Stanley F.C. and the Haworth Art Gallery which holds Europe's largest collection of Tiffany glass.

November 5th
49209 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Wellingborough

Population 49087

Wellingborough is a market town and borough in Northamptonshire, England, situated 11 miles (18 km) from the county town of Northampton. The town is situated on the north side of the River Nene, most of the older town is sited on the flanks of the hills above the river's current flood plain. Due to frequent flooding by the River Nene, the town was mostly built above the current level of the flood plain. Originally named "Wendelingburgh", the settlement was established in the Saxon period and is mentioned in the Domesday Book under the name of "Wendelburie". The town was granted a royal market charter in 1201, by King John of England. As of 2011 the census states the borough has a population of 75,400, which the town itself accounts for 49,087. The town of Wellingborough is governed by The Borough Council of Wellingborough, with their office located in the town centre. The town is twinned with Niort in France, and with Wittlich in Germany. The town is predicted to grow by around 30 percent under the Milton Keynes South Midlands (MKSM) study, as the British government has identified Wellingborough as one of several towns in Northamptonshire where growth will be directed over the next 30 years. The study allocates 12,800 additional homes mainly to the east of the town. The town has also a growing commuter population as it is located on the Midland Main Line railway, operated by East Midlands Trains, which has InterCity trains to London St Pancras International station taking under an hour, giving an interchange with Eurostar services.

November 4th
48831 dead in the UK from COVID-19
November 3rd
48505 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Shoreham-by-Sea

Population 48487

Shoreham-by-Sea (often shortened to Shoreham) is a seaside town and port in West Sussex, England. The town has a population of 48,487 according to the 2011 census, and is historically part of Sussex. The town is bordered to its north by the South Downs, to its west by the Adur Valley and to its south by the River Adur and Shoreham Beach on the English Channel. The town lies in the middle of the ribbon of urban development along the English south coast between the city of Brighton and Hove and the town of Worthing. Shoreham civil parish covers an area of 984.88 hectares (2,433.7 acres) and has a population of 19,175 (2001 census).

November 2nd
48149 dead in the UK from COVID-19
November 1st
47820 dead in the UK from COVID-19
October 31st
47464 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Ayr

Population 47190

Ayr (/ɛər/; Scottish Gaelic: Inbhir Àir, "Mouth of the River Ayr") is a large town and former Royal Burgh situated on the west coast of Ayrshire in Scotland, United Kingdom. It is the administrative centre of the South Ayrshire council area and historical county town of Ayrshire. Ayr is currently the most populated settlement in Ayrshire and is the 12th most populous settlement in Scotland. The town was established as a Royal Burgh in 1205, serving as Ayrshire's central marketplace and harbour throughout the Medieval Period and remaining a well-renowned port across the Early Modern Period. On the southern bank of the River Ayr sits the ramparts of a Citadel constructed by Oliver Cromwell during the mid-17th Century. Towards the south of the town is the birthplace of Scottish poet Robert Burns in the suburb of Alloway. With the expansion of the railway during the 19th Century Ayr soon developed into a seaside resort. This remains the case today with tourism occupying a significant sect of the local economy in Ayr through the opening of a Butlin's holiday park on the southern headlands of the town and through the continued presence of the Gaiety Theatre, which ran various shows across the late 20th century, attracting performers from across the United Kingdom. Politically, Ayr is considerably more Conservative-voting than the remainder of Scotland, being represented by a Conservative MP continuously for a period of 91 years – from 1906 (as part of the Ayr Burghs constituency) until 1997. The town forms part of the first Conservative constituency seat in the Scottish Parliament which has been represented by Conservative MSP John Scott since a by-election in 2000. The town is now marginally contested between the Conservatives and the Scottish National Party. Ayr is one of the largest retail centres along the south of Scotland and was recognised as the second healthiest town centre in the United Kingdom by the Royal Society for Public Health in 2014. Ayr has hosted the Scottish Grand National horse-racing steeplechase annually since 1965. The town also accommodates the headquarters of the Ayr Advertiser and Ayrshire Post newspapers and the West FM radio station.

October 30th
47145 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Plumstead

Population 47145

(For other places with the same name, see Plumstead (disambiguation).) Plumstead is a district of south east London located in the Royal Borough of Greenwich. It is located east of Woolwich and south west of Thamesmead. Plumstead is a multicultural area with large Asian and Afro-Caribbean communities, in similarity to local areas such as Woolwich and Thamesmead. Plumstead is the location for a large bus garage built in 1981 on former industrial land and a substantial Church of England parish church dedicated to St Nicholas.

October 29th
46807 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Folkestone

Population 46698

Folkestone /ˈfoʊkstən/ is a port town on the English Channel, in Kent, south-east England. The town lies on the southern edge of the North Downs at a valley between two cliffs. It was an important harbour and shipping port for most of the 19th and 20th century. There has been a settlement in this location since the Mesolithic era and was inhabited during Roman Britain. A nunnery was founded by Eanswith, daughter of Æthelberht of Kent in the 7th century, who is still commemorated as part of the town's culture. During the 13th century it subsequently developed into a sea port and the harbour developed during the early 19th century to provide defence against a French invasion, and expanded further after the arrival of the railway in 1843. The harbour's use has diminished since the opening of the nearby Channel Tunnel and stopping of local ferry services, but still remains in active use.

October 28th
46497 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Kilmarnock

Population 46350

Kilmarnock (Scottish Gaelic: Cille Mheàrnaig, "Meàrnag's church") is a large burgh in East Ayrshire, Scotland with a population of 46,350, making it the 15th most populated place in Scotland and the second largest town in Ayrshire. The River Irvine runs through its eastern section, and the Kilmarnock Water passes through it, giving rise to the name 'Bank Street'. Kilmarnock is often shortened to 'Killie', especially when it is referenced in a footballing situation. Kilmarnock is the main town within East Ayrshire, and the East Ayrshire HQ is located on London Road in Kilmarnock, leading to the villages Crookedholm and Hurlford, which furthermore leads to Loudoun. The first collection of work by Scottish poet Robert Burns, Poems, chiefly in the Scottish dialect, was published here in 1786, and became known as the Kilmarnock volume. The internationally distributed whisky brand Johnnie Walker originated in the town in the 19th century. Protest and backing from the Scottish Government took place in 2009, after Diageo, the owner of Johnnie Walker announced plans to close the bottling plant in the town after 289 years. In recent years, Kilmarnock has been used for musical acts and film locations. Rock band Biffy Clyro were formed in the town in a primary school in the mid-1990s. The 2001 film, Pyaar Ishq Aur Mohabbat (2001) was shot in the town as was Manhunt (2004).

October 27th
46216 dead in the UK from COVID-19
October 26th
45950 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Sutton-in-Ashfield

Population 45848

Sutton-in-Ashfield is a market town in the Ashfield district of Nottinghamshire, England, with a population of around 45,800. It is situated four miles west of Mansfield, close to the Derbyshire border.

October 25th
45674 dead in the UK from COVID-19
October 24th
45427 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Chippenham

Population 45337

Chippenham is an historic market town in Wiltshire, England, 13 miles (21 km) east of Bath and 96 miles (154 km) west of London. In the 2011 census, the Chippenham community area's population was recorded at 45,337, and the built up area of Chippenham had a population of 35,800 The town was established on a crossing of the River Avon and some form of settlement is believed to have existed there since before Roman times. It was a royal vill, and probably a royal hunting lodge, under Alfred the Great. The primary school, King's Lodge School, gets its name from this tradition. The town continued to grow when the Great Western Railway arrived in 1841. The town is now a commuter town. Chippenham is twinned with La Flèche in France and Friedberg in Germany. The town's motto is Unity and Loyalty.

October 23rd
45216 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Ashton-under-Lyne

Population 45198

Ashton-under-Lyne (pop. 43,200) is a market town in Tameside, Greater Manchester, England. The population had increased to 45,198 at the 2011 census. Historically in Lancashire, it is on the north bank of the River Tame, in the foothills of the Pennines, 6.2 miles (10.0 km) east of Manchester. Evidence of Stone Age, Bronze Age, and Viking activity has been discovered in Ashton-under-Lyne. The "Ashton" part of the town's name probably dates from the Anglo-Saxon period, and derives from Old English meaning "settlement by ash trees". The origin of the "under-Lyne" suffix is less clear; it possibly derives from the British lemo meaning elm or from Ashton's proximity to the Pennines. In the Middle Ages, Ashton-under-Lyne was a parish and township and Ashton Old Hall was held by the de Asshetons, lords of the manor. Granted a Royal Charter in 1414, the manor spanned a rural area consisting of marshland, moorland, and a number of villages and hamlets. Until the introduction of the cotton trade in 1769, Ashton was considered "bare, wet, and almost worthless". The factory system, and textile manufacture during the Industrial Revolution triggered a process of unplanned urbanisation in the area, and by the mid-19th century Ashton had emerged as an important mill town at a convergence of newly constructed canals and railways. Ashton-under-Lyne's transport network allowed for an economic boom in cotton spinning, weaving, and coal mining, which led to the granting of municipal borough status in 1847. In the mid-20th century, imports of cheaper foreign goods led to the decline of Ashton's heavy industries but the town has continued to thrive as a centre of commerce and Ashton Market is one of the largest outdoor markets in the United Kingdom. The 140,000-square-foot (13,000 m2), two-floored Ashton Arcades shopping centre opened in 1995 and an IKEA store in 2006.

October 22nd
44994 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Worksop

Population 44790

Worksop is the largest town in the Bassetlaw district of Nottinghamshire, England, on the River Ryton at the northern edge of Sherwood Forest. It is about 19 miles (31 km) east-south-east of the City of Sheffield and its population is estimated (Mid 2012) to be 44,970. It is also twinned with the German town Garbsen. Worksop is attracting an increasing quantity of commuters to the local area because of its close proximity of Nottingham, Lincoln and Sheffield. Worksop is known as the "Gateway to the Dukeries", because of the now four obsolete ducal principal sites of which were closely located next to each other, south of the town. These four ducal locations were; Clumber House, Thoresby Hall, Welbeck Abbey and Rufford Abbey.

October 21st
44760 dead in the UK from COVID-19
October 20th
44538 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Morley, West Yorkshire

Population 44440

Morley is a market town and civil parish within the City of Leeds metropolitan borough, in West Yorkshire, England. It lies approximately 5 miles (8 km) south-west of Leeds city centre. The town had a population of 44,440 in 2011 and is made up of the Morley North and South Wards. The civil parish had a population of 27,738. The town is built on seven hills, like Rome: Scatcherd Hill, Dawson Hill, Daisy Hill, Chapel Hill, Hunger Hill, Troy Hill and Banks Hill.

October 19th
44344 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Greenock

Population 44248

Greenock (/ˈɡriːnək/; Scottish Gaelic: Grianaig, pronounced [kɾʲiənɛkʲ]) is a town and administrative centre in the Inverclyde council area in Scotland and a former burgh within the historic county of Renfrewshire, located in the west central Lowlands of Scotland. It forms part of a contiguous urban area with Gourock to the west and Port Glasgow to the east. The 2011 census showed that Greenock had a population of 44,248, a decrease from the 46,861 recorded in the 2001 Census. It lies on the south bank of the Clyde at the "Tail of the Bank" where the River Clyde expands into the Firth of Clyde.

October 18th
44154 dead in the UK from COVID-19
October 17th
43996 dead in the UK from COVID-19
October 16th
43821 dead in the UK from COVID-19
October 15th
43675 dead in the UK from COVID-19
October 14th
43524 dead in the UK from COVID-19
October 13th
43410 dead in the UK from COVID-19
October 12th
43300 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Welwyn Garden City

Population 43252

Welwyn Garden City /ˈwɛlɪn/, also known locally as "WGC" or "Welwyn Garden", is a town in Hertfordshire, England. It is located approximately 19 miles (31 km) from Kings Cross, London. Welwyn Garden City was the second garden city in England (founded 1920) and one of the first new towns (designated 1948). It is unique in being both a garden city and a new town and exemplifies the physical, social and cultural planning ideals of the periods in which it was built.

October 11th
43189 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Grantham

Population 43117

Grantham (pronounced /ˈɡrænθəm/) is a market town within the South Kesteven district of Lincolnshire, England. It bestrides the London to Edinburgh East Coast Main Line railway and the River Witham, and is bounded to the west by the A1 main north-south road. Grantham is about 26 miles (42 km) south of the city and county town of Lincoln, and about 24 miles (39 km) east of the city of Nottingham. The resident population in 2014 was estimated as 43,117, excluding the adjacent villages of Great Gonerby and Barrowby. The town is best known as the birthplace of former prime minister Margaret Thatcher, and the place where Isaac Newton went to school, at The King's School. It is close to an ancient Roman road, and was the scene of Oliver Cromwell's first advantage over Royalists during the English Civil War at Gonerby Moor. Grantham is also notable for having the first female police officers in the United Kingdom, notably Edith Smith in 1914, and producing the first running diesel engine in 1892, and the UK's first tractor in 1896.

October 10th
43067 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Kingston upon Thames

Population 43013

Kingston upon Thames, also known as Kingston, is the principal settlement of the Royal Borough of Kingston upon Thames in southwest London. It was the ancient market town where Saxon kings were crowned. Kingston is situated 10 miles (16 kilometres) southwest of Charing Cross and is one of the major metropolitan centres identified in the London Plan. Kingston lies approximately 10 metres (33 ft) above sea level. Kingston was part of a large ancient parish in the county of Surrey and the town was an ancient borough, reformed in 1835. It has been the location of Surrey County Hall from 1893, extraterritorially in terms of local government administration since Kingston became part of Greater London in 1965. Most of the town centre is part of the KT1 postcode area, but some areas north of Kingston railway station have the postcode KT2 instead. The population of the town itself, comprising the four wards of Canbury, Grove, Norbiton and Tudor, was 43,013 in the 2011 census.

October 9th
42964 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Lytham St Annes

Population 42954

Lytham St Annes (/ˈlɪðəm səntˈænz/ LIDH-əm sənt-ANZ) is a conurbation in the Fylde district of Lancashire, England. The neighbouring towns of Lytham and St. Annes-on-the-Sea (nearly always abbreviated to St Annes) have grown together and now form a seaside resort. The towns are situated on the Fylde coast, south of Blackpool at the point where the coastline turns east to form the estuary of the River Ribble leading inland to Preston. St Annes is situated on the northern side of the turning and, like Blackpool, overlooks the Irish Sea, whereas Lytham is on the eastern side and overlooks the Ribble Estuary. The population of Lytham St Annes taken at the 2011 census was 42,954. Lytham St Annes is internationally renowned for golf and has four courses and links, the most notable being the Royal Lytham & St Annes Golf Club, one of the host courses for the Open Championship, also known as the "British Open", which has been a competition course since first hosting the Open in 1926. Approximately once every ten years, the coming of The Open—a major sporting event—brings a major influx of visitors, including the world's media, into a fairly peaceful community. Lytham St Annes is considered to be a wealthy area with residents' earnings among the highest in the North of England.

October 8th
42885 dead in the UK from COVID-19

King's Lynn

Population 42800

King's Lynn /ˌkɪŋz ˈlɪn/, also known as Lynn and until 1537 as Bishop's Lynn, is a seaport and market town in the ceremonial county of Norfolk in the East of England. It lies 97 miles (156 km) north of London and 44 miles (71 km) west of Norwich. The population of the town is 42,800. The town has two theatres, museums and other cultural and sporting venues. There are three secondary schools and one college. The service sector, information and communication technologies and creative industries, provide limited employment for the population of King's Lynn and the surrounding area.

October 7th
42793 dead in the UK from COVID-19
October 6th
42691 dead in the UK from COVID-19
October 5th
42622 dead in the UK from COVID-19
October 4th
42553 dead in the UK from COVID-19
October 3rd
42493 dead in the UK from COVID-19
October 2nd
42427 dead in the UK from COVID-19
October 1st
42359 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 30th
42293 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 29th
42236 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Fareham

Population 42210

Fareham /ˈfɛərəm/ is a market town at the north-west tip of Portsmouth Harbour, between the cities of Portsmouth and Southampton in the south east of Hampshire, England. It gives its name to the borough that comprises the town and its surrounding area. It was historically an important manufacturer of bricks (notably used to build the Royal Albert Hall, London) and a grower of strawberries. Current employment includes retail (including Fareham Shopping Centre with around 100 shops), small-scale manufacturing, and defence (with the Royal Navy's HMS Collingwood and the Ministry of Defence's Defence Science and Technology Laboratory nearby).

September 28th
42188 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 27th
42134 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 26th
42088 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 25th
42048 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 24th
42016 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 23rd
41981 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 22nd
41925 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 21st
41886 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 20th
41859 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 19th
41828 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Urmston

Population 41825

Urmston /ˈɜːrmstən/ is a town in Trafford, Greater Manchester, England, with a population of 41,825 at the 2011 Census. Historically in Lancashire, it is about six miles (10 km) southwest of Manchester city centre. The southern boundary is the River Mersey, with Stretford lying to the east and Flixton to the west. Davyhulme lies to the north of the town centre. Urmston covers an area of 4,799 acres (19 km²). The town has early medieval origins, and until the arrival of the railway in 1873 was a small farming community. The railway acted as a catalyst, transforming the town into a residence for the middle classes. Today, Urmston is one of the major urban areas in Trafford: it includes the areas of Davyhulme and Flixton.

September 18th
41808 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 17th
41785 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 16th
41758 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 15th
41732 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 14th
41715 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 13th
41694 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 12th
41678 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 11th
41660 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 10th
41647 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 9th
41634 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 8th
41625 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 7th
41616 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 6th
41601 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 5th
41593 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 4th
41580 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 3rd
41573 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 2nd
41563 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 1st
41554 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 31st
41551 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 30th
41542 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 29th
41536 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 28th
41531 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 27th
41521 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 26th
41513 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 25th
41502 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 24th
41490 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 23rd
41484 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Sutton, London

Population 41483

Sutton is the principal town of the London Borough of Sutton in South London, England. It lies on the lower slopes of the North Downs, and has the administrative headquarters of the borough. It is located 10.4 miles (16.7 km) south-south west of Charing Cross, and is one of the eleven metropolitan centres identified in the London Plan. An ancient parish in the county of Surrey, Sutton is recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 as having two churches and two acres of meadow at that time. Sutton's location on the London to Brighton turnpike from 1755 led to the establishment of coaching inns, spurring its further development as a village. When it was connected to central London by rail in 1847, the village began to grow into a town, and there was significant Victorian-era expansion, both commercially and residentially. Sutton's expansion and increase in population accelerated in the 20th century as part of the suburban growth of London. It became a municipal borough with neighbouring Cheam in 1934, and has formed part of Greater London since 1965. Sutton has a theatre, the largest library in the borough, several works of public art, four conservation areas and a park and green at either end of the high street. It contains a civic and retail district, a business sector, including a number of large international companies, and the sixth most important shopping area in London, centred on Sutton High Street. Sutton mainline railway station is the largest in the borough, with frequent services to central London among other destinations. Along with Wimbledon Studios, Sutton is a hub for filming in south-west London. Sutton is home to the Royal Marsden Hospital and the Institute of Cancer Research; there are plans to create the world's second biggest cancer research campus on the site. The town has among the lowest levels of crime in Greater London. Sutton is home to a significant number of the borough's schools, within a borough which is among the top performing authorities for education in the country. In 2011 Sutton was the top performing borough for GCSE results in England.

August 22nd
41470 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 21st
41462 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 20th
41455 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 19th
41447 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 18th
41444 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 17th
41435 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 16th
41423 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 15th
41419 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 14th
41407 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 13th
41400 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 12th
41391 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 11th
41384 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 10th
41374 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 9th
41361 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 8th
41353 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Boston, Lincolnshire

Population 41340

Boston (/ˈbɒstən/) is a town and small port in Lincolnshire, on the east coast of England. It is the largest town of the wider Borough of Boston local government district. The borough had a total population of 64,637 at the 2011 census, while the town itself had a population of 35,124 at the 2001 census. It is due north of Greenwich on the Prime Meridian. Boston's most notable landmark is St Botolph's Church ("The Stump"), said to be the largest parish church in England, with one of the taller towers in England visible for miles around from the flat lands of Lincolnshire. Residents of Boston are known as Bostonians. Emigrants from Boston named several other settlements after the town, most notably Boston, Massachusetts, in the United States.

August 7th
41339 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 6th
41327 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 5th
41318 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 4th
41312 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 3rd
41298 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 2nd
41283 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Bridgwater

Population 41276

Bridgwater is a market town and civil parish in Somerset, England. At the 2011 census, it had a population of 35,886. Bridgwater is at the edge of the Somerset Levels, in level and well-wooded country; to the north are the Mendips and to the west the Quantock hills. The town lies along both sides of the River Parrett, 10 miles (16 km) from its mouth, has been a major port and trading centre and maintains a large industrial base. It is linked to Taunton by the Bridgwater and Taunton Canal. Bridgwater is between two junctions of the M5 motorway and Bridgwater railway station is on the main railway line between Bristol and Taunton. Historically, the town had a politically radical tendency. The Battle of Sedgemoor, where the Monmouth Rebellion was finally crushed in 1685, was fought nearby. Notable buildings include the Church of St Mary and the house in Blake Street, largely restored, which was the birthplace of Admiral Blake in 1598, and is now the Blake Museum. The town has an arts centre and plays host to the annual Bridgwater Guy Fawkes Carnival.

August 1st
41273 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 31st
41262 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 30th
41248 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 29th
41238 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 28th
41226 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 27th
41214 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 26th
41203 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 25th
41187 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Bexhill-on-Sea

Population 41173

Bexhill-on-Sea (often simply Bexhill) is a seaside town situated in the county of East Sussex in South East England. An ancient town and part of the local-government district of Rother, Bexhill is home to a number of archaeological sites, a Manor House in the Old Town, an abundance of Edwardian and Victorian architecture, and the famous De La Warr Pavilion: today a modern-art gallery – which has featured the work of Andy Warhol amongst others – and performance hall, where the likes of comedian Lee Evans and author Michael Morpurgo have appeared.

July 24th
41172 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Coatbridge

Population 41170

Coatbridge (Scots: Cotbrig or Coatbrig, Scottish Gaelic: Drochaid a' Chòta) is a town in North Lanarkshire, Scotland, about 10 miles (16 km) east of Glasgow city centre, set in the central Lowlands. The town, with neighbouring Airdrie, is part of the Greater Glasgow urban area. While the earliest known settlement of the area dates back to the Stone Age era, the founding of the town can be traced to the 12th century when a Royal Charter was granted to the Monks of Newbattle Abbey by King Malcolm IV. Coatbridge, along with its neighbour Airdrie, forms the area known as the Monklands. It was during the last years of the 18th century that the area developed from a loose collection of hamlets into the town of Coatbridge. The town's development and growth have been intimately connected with the technological advances of the industrial revolution, and in particular with the hot blast process. Coatbridge was a major Scottish centre for iron works and coal mining during the 19th century and in this period was described as 'the industrial heartland of Scotland' and the 'Iron Burgh'. Coatbridge also had a notorious reputation for air pollution and the worst excesses of industry. By the time of the 1920s however, coal seams were exhausted and the iron industry in Coatbridge was in rapid decline. After the Great Depression the Gartsherrie ironwork was the last remaining iron works in the town. One publication has commented that in modern-day Coatbridge 'coal, iron and steel have all been consigned to the heritage scrap heap'. Coatbridge today is best described as a working class town anchored to Glasgow, the largest city in Scotland. It has also been described as "populated largely by people of Irish descent".

July 23rd
41165 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 22nd
41149 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 21st
41132 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 20th
41112 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 19th
41100 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 18th
41086 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 17th
41072 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 16th
41054 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 15th
41041 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 14th
41021 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 13th
41000 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 12th
40976 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 11th
40963 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 10th
40941 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 9th
40920 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 8th
40883 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 7th
40859 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 6th
40832 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 5th
40797 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 4th
40770 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 3rd
40737 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Kingswood, South Gloucestershire

Population 40734

(Not to be confused with Kingswood, Stroud District.) Kingswood is an urban area in South Gloucestershire, England, on the eastern border of the City of Bristol.

July 2nd
40708 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 1st
40665 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Bury St Edmunds

Population 40664

Bury St Edmunds is a market town in Suffolk, England. Bury St Edmunds Abbey is near the town centre. Bury is the seat of the Diocese of St Edmundsbury and Ipswich, with the episcopal see at St Edmundsbury Cathedral. The town, originally called Beodericsworth, was built on a grid pattern by Abbot Baldwin around 1080. It is known for brewing and malting (Greene King brewery) and for a British Sugar processing factory, where Silver Spoon sugar is produced. The town is the cultural and retail centre for West Suffolk and tourism is a major part of the economy.

June 30th
40638 dead in the UK from COVID-19
June 29th
40591 dead in the UK from COVID-19
June 28th
40552 dead in the UK from COVID-19
June 27th
40509 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Kirkby

Population 40472

Kirkby /ˈkɜːrbi/ is a town in the Metropolitan Borough of Knowsley, Merseyside, England. Historically in Lancashire, it developed from the 1950s to the 1970s as a housing overspill of Liverpool. It is roughly 5 miles (8 km) north of Huyton and 6 miles (10 km) north-east of Liverpool. The population in 2011 was 40,472. It is believed to have been founded in 870 although there is archaeological evidence for settlement from the Bronze Age.

June 26th
40460 dead in the UK from COVID-19
June 25th
40418 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Ramsgate

Population 40408

Ramsgate is a seaside town in the district of Thanet in east Kent, England. It was one of the great English seaside towns of the 19th century. In 2001 it had a population of around 40,000. Ramsgate’s main attraction is its coastline, and its main industries are tourism and fishing. The town has one of the largest marinas on the English south coast, and the Port of Ramsgate has provided cross-channel ferries for many years.

June 24th
40351 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Salisbury

Population 40302

Salisbury (various pronunciations, but locally /ˈsɔːzbri/, SAWZ-bree) is a cathedral city in Wiltshire, England, and the only city within the county. It is the third-largest settlement in the county, after Swindon and Chippenham, with a population of 40,302, unusually declining from 45,000 at the 2006 census. The city is located in the southeast of Wiltshire, near the edge of Salisbury Plain. Its cathedral was formerly located to the north at Old Sarum; following its relocation, a settlement grew up around it, drawing residents from Old Sarum and Wilton. The new town received its city charter in 1227 under the name New Sarum, which continued to be its official name until 2009, when the Salisbury City Council was established. It sits at the confluence of five rivers: the Nadder, Ebble, Wylye, and Bourne are tributary to the Hampshire Avon, which flows to the south coast and into the sea at Christchurch in Dorset. Salisbury railway station serves the city and is a regional interchange, at the crossing point between the West of England Main Line and the Wessex Main Line. Stonehenge, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, is about 8 miles (13 km) northwest of Salisbury and greatly aids the local economy. The city itself, Old Sarum, the present cathedral and the ruins of the former one also attract visitors.

June 23rd
40276 dead in the UK from COVID-19
June 22nd
40213 dead in the UK from COVID-19
June 21st
40149 dead in the UK from COVID-19
June 20th
40095 dead in the UK from COVID-19
June 19th
40035 dead in the UK from COVID-19
June 18th
39983 dead in the UK from COVID-19
June 17th
39922 dead in the UK from COVID-19
June 16th
39864 dead in the UK from COVID-19
June 15th
39780 dead in the UK from COVID-19
June 14th
39710 dead in the UK from COVID-19
June 13th
39623 dead in the UK from COVID-19
June 12th
39561 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Cleethorpes

Population 39505

Cleethorpes is a seaside resort on the estuary of the Humber in North East Lincolnshire, England with a population of nearly 40,000 in 2011. It has been permanently occupied since the 6th century, with fishing as a primary industry, while developing as a resort since the 19th century. The town lies on the Greenwich meridian and its average annual rainfall is amongst the lowest in the British Isles.

June 11th
39482 dead in the UK from COVID-19
June 10th
39402 dead in the UK from COVID-19
June 9th
39293 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Glenrothes

Population 39277

Glenrothes (; /ɡlɛnˈrɒθᵻs/, glen-ROTH-iss; Scottish Gaelic: Gleann Ràthais) is a town situated in the heart of Fife, in east-central Scotland. It is located approximately 30 miles (48 km) from both Edinburgh, which lies to the south and Dundee to the north. The town had a population of 39,277 in 2011 as recorded by the census, making it the third largest settlement in Fife and the 18th most populous settlement in Scotland. The name Glenrothes comes from its historical link with the Earl of Rothes who owned much of the land upon which the new town has been built; "Glen" (Scottish for valley) was added to the name to avoid confusion with Rothes in Moray and in recognition that the town lies in a river valley. The motto of Glenrothes is "Ex terra vis", meaning "Out of the earth, strength", which dates back to the founding of the town. Planned in the late 1940s as one of Scotland's first post-second world war new towns its original purpose was to house miners who were to work at a newly established coal mine, the Rothes Colliery. Following the failure of the mine the town developed as an important industrial centre in Scotland's Silicon Glen between 1961 and 2000 with several major electronics and hi-tech companies setting up facilities in the town. The Glenrothes Development Corporation (GDC), a non-departmental public body, was established to develop, manage and promote the new town. The GDC supported by the local authority oversaw the governance of Glenrothes until the wind-up of the GDC in 1995, after which all responsibility was transferred to Fife Council. Glenrothes is the administrative capital of Fife containing both the Fife Council and Police Scotland Fife Division headquarters. Home to Fife's main concentration of specialist manufacturing and engineering companies, several organisations have their global headquarters based in Glenrothes. Public services and service industries are also important to the town's economy. Major employers include Bosch Rexroth (hydraulics manufacturing), Brand Rex (fibre optics manufacturing), Fife College (education) and Raytheon (defence and electronics). Glenrothes is unique in Fife as the majority of the town's centre is contained indoors, within Fife's largest indoor shopping centre, the Kingdom Shopping Centre. The town has won multiple horticultural awards in the "Beautiful Scotland" and "Britain in Bloom" contests for the quality of its parks and landscaping. It has numerous outdoor sculptures and artworks, a result of the appointment of town artists in the early development of the town. Public facilities include a regional sports and leisure centre, two golf courses, major parks, a civic centre and theatre and a college campus. The A92 trunk road provides the principal access to the town passing through Glenrothes and connecting it to the wider Scottish motorway and trunk road network. A major bus station is located in the town centre providing regional and local bus services to surrounding settlements.

June 8th
39203 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Hatfield, Hertfordshire

Population 39202

(Not to be confused with Hatfield, Herefordshire.) Hatfield is a town and civil parish in Hertfordshire, England, in the borough of Welwyn Hatfield. It had a population of 29,616 in 2001, and is of Saxon origin. Hatfield House, the home of the Marquess of Salisbury, is the nucleus of the old town. From the 1930s when de Havilland opened a factory until the 1990s when British Aerospace closed, Hatfield was associated with aircraft design and manufacture, which employed more people than any other industry. Hatfield was one of the post-war New Towns built around London and has much modernist architecture from the period. The University of Hertfordshire is based there. Hatfield is 20 miles (30 kilometres) north of London and is connected to the capital via the A1(M) and direct trains to London King's Cross, Finsbury Park and Moorgate. As a result, the town has seen a recent increase in commuters who work in London moving to the area.

June 7th
39080 dead in the UK from COVID-19
June 6th
38953 dead in the UK from COVID-19
June 5th
38842 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Skelmersdale

Population 38813

Skelmersdale /ˈskɛlməzˌdeɪl/ is a town in West Lancashire, England. It lies on high-ground on the River Tawd, 6 miles (10 km) to the west of Wigan, 13 miles (21 km) to the northeast of Liverpool, 15 miles (24 km) south-southwest of Preston. As of 2006, Skelmersdale had a population of 38,813, down from 41,000 in 2004. The town is known locally as Skem /ˈskɛm/.The first recorded use of the name Skelmersdale appears in the Domesday Book of 1086. It was under the rule of Uctred as part of the hundred of West Derby. The urbanisation and development of Skelmersdale largely coincided with the Industrial Revolution. Industrial scale coal mining began in the early 19th century and continued to expand during that century to give rise to Skelmersdale as an important colliery village. The town forms part of the Wigan Urban Area. Skelmersdale was designated as a new town in 1961.

June 4th
38720 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Tonbridge

Population 38657

Tonbridge (pronunciation and historic spelling Tunbridge) is a market town in the English county of Kent, with a population of 38,657 in 2011. It is located on the River Medway, approximately 4 miles (6 km) north of Royal Tunbridge Wells, 12 miles (19 km) south west of Maidstone and 29 miles (47 km) south east of London. It belongs to the administrative borough of Tonbridge and Malling (population 120,805 in 2011). There are several independent educational establishments in the town, including the prestigious Tonbridge School.

June 3rd
38586 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Herne Bay, Kent

Population 38563

Herne Bay /hɜːrn/ is a seaside town in Kent, South East England, with a population of 38,563. On the south coast of the Thames Estuary it is 7 miles (11 km) north of Canterbury and 5 miles (8 km) east of Whitstable. It neighbours the ancient villages of Herne and Reculver and is part of the City of Canterbury local government district. Herne Bay's seafront is home to the world's first freestanding purpose-built Clock Tower, built in 1837; from the late Victorian period until 1978, the town had the second-longest pier in the United Kingdom. The town began as a small shipping community, receiving goods and passengers from London en route to Canterbury and Dover. The town rose to prominence as a seaside resort during the early 19th century after the building of a pleasure pier and promenade by a group of London investors, and reached its heyday in the late Victorian era. Its popularity as a holiday destination has declined over the past decades, due to the increase in foreign travel and to a lesser degree exposure to flooding that has prevented the town's redevelopment.

June 2nd
38431 dead in the UK from COVID-19
June 1st
38262 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Bishop's Stortford

Population 38202

Bishop's Stortford is a historic market town and civil parish in Hertfordshire, England. It is just west of the M11 motorway on the county boundary with Essex and is the closest sizeable town to London Stansted Airport. Bishop's Stortford is 27 miles (43 km) north east of Charing Cross in central London and 35 miles (56 km) from Liverpool Street station, the London terminus of the line to Cambridge that runs through the town. Bishop's Stortford has a population of 38,202.

May 31st
38127 dead in the UK from COVID-19
May 30th
38001 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Camberley

Population 37916

Camberley /ˈkæmbərliː/ is a town in Surrey, England, 31 miles (50 km) southwest of central London, between the M3 and M4 motorways. The town is in the far west of the county, close to the borders of Hampshire and Berkshire; the boundaries intersect on the western edge of the town where all three counties converge on the A30 national route. It is the main town in the borough of Surrey Heath. Camberley's suburbs include Crawley Hill, Yorktown, Diamond Ridge, Heatherside, and Old Dean.

May 29th
37838 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Arnold, Nottinghamshire

Population 37768

Arnold is a market town, unparished area and suburb of the city of Nottingham, in the English ceremonial county of Nottinghamshire. It is to the north-east of Nottingham’s city boundary, and is in the local government district of Gedling Borough. Since 1968 Arnold has had a market, and the town used to have numerous factories associated with the hosiery industry. Arnold’s town centre is the largest in Gedling Borough (whose headquarters are located in the town) and the most important in the northeastern part of the Greater Nottingham conurbation. Nottinghamshire Police have been headquartered in Arnold since 1979. At the time of the 2011 Census, Arnold had a population of 37,768. Areas within Arnold include Daybrook, Woodthorpe, Redhill and Killisick.

May 28th
37652 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Fishponds

Population 37575

Fishponds is an outer urban area in the north-east of the English city of Bristol. It is approximately 3 miles (5 km) from the City centre. It has two large Victorian era parks; Eastville Park and Vassell's Park (formerly the Vassell's Family estate) and also known locally as Oldbury Court. The River Frome runs through both parks, with the Frome Valley Walkway running alongside it. A restored mill can be found at Snuff Mills near the Vassells Park end of the river. It has retained its original waterwheel which can still be seen and heard turning today. Eastville Park has its own large boating lake with central wildlife reserves. Fishponds is mainly a residential area through which two main bus routes pass. Housing is typically of the terraced Victorian variety. The high street has many shops, such as greengrocers and florists as well as Lidl, Aldi and Morrisons supermarkets. There is a small student population due to the presence of the Glenside campus of the University of the West of England. The name of this area of Bristol derives from when it was, like nearby Soundwell, a quarry district. The empty quarries were then filled and there were many large fishponds in the area which have since been filled in. There was one pond remaining which was, until the mid-1970s when it was officially closed, a popular swimming area, named "The Lido" by locals. It is now owned by a private angling club. The outskirts of Fishponds to the south comprise Chester Park and Mayfield Park. Fishponds is bordered by five suburbs: Downend, Staple Hill, St. George, Eastville and Stapleton. At the 2011 census the Greater Fishponds area had a population of 37,575.

May 27th
37435 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Blyth, Northumberland

Population 37339

Blyth (/ˈblaɪð/ blithe) is a town and civil parish in southeast Northumberland, England. It lies on the coast, to the south of the River Blyth and is approximately 21 kilometres (13 mi) northeast of Newcastle upon Tyne. It has a population of about 37,339. The port of Blyth dates from the 12th century, but the development of the modern town only began in the first quarter of the 18th century. The main industries which helped the town prosper were coal mining and shipbuilding, with the salt trade, fishing and the railways also playing an important role. These industries have largely vanished, but the port still thrives, shipping paper and pulp from Scandinavia for the newspaper industries of England and Scotland. The town was seriously affected when its principal industries went into decline, and it has undergone much regeneration since the early 1990s. The Keel Row Shopping Centre, opened in 1991, brought major high street retailers to Blyth, and helped to revitalise the town centre. The market place has recently been re-developed, with the aim of attracting further investment to the town. The Quayside has also seen much redevelopment and has been transformed into a peaceful open space, the centrepiece of which is a sculpture commemorating the industry which once thrived there. There were, on the opposite side of the river are the nine wind turbines of the Blyth Harbour Wind Farm, which were constructed along the East Pier in 1992. They were joined in 2000 by Blyth Offshore Wind Farm, which is composed of two turbines situated 1 kilometre (0.62 mi) out to sea. Although the original 9 turbines have now been demolished, there is currently one bigger turbine on the North Blyth side with building work taking place on a second turbine. Blyth is also home to the non-League football club Blyth Spartans, famed for their 1978 "giant-killing" feats in the FA Cup.

May 26th
37240 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Airdrie, North Lanarkshire

Population 37130

Airdrie (/ˈɛərdri/; Scottish Gaelic: An t-Àrd Ruigh) is a town in North Lanarkshire, Scotland. It lies on a plateau roughly 400 ft (130 m) above sea level, and is approximately 12 miles (19 km) east of Glasgow city centre. Airdrie forms part of a conurbation with its neighbour Coatbridge, in the former district known as the Monklands. As of 2012, the town had a population of 37,130. Chapelhall, Calderbank, Caldercruix, Gartness, Glenmavis, Greengairs, Longriggend, Moffat Mills, Plains, Stand, Upperton and Wattston are generally considered satellite villages of Airdrie.

May 25th
37029 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Beeston, Nottinghamshire

Population 37010

(For other uses, see Beeston (disambiguation).) Beeston is a town in Nottinghamshire, England. It is 3.4 miles (5.5 km) southwest of Nottingham city centre. Although typically regarded as a suburb of the City of Nottingham, and officially designated as part of the Nottingham Urban Area, for local government purposes it is in the borough of Broxtowe, lying outside the City's unitary authority area. To the immediate northeast is the University of Nottingham's main campus, University Park. The pharmaceutical and retail chemist group Boots has its headquarters on a large campus just 0.6 miles (1 km) east of the centre of Beeston, falling on the border of Broxtowe and the City of Nottingham. To the south is the River Trent, Attenborough and its extensive wetlands.

May 24th
36828 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Houghton-le-Spring

Population 36746

Houghton-le-Spring /ˈhoʊtən liː spriŋ/ is a town in North East England, which has its recorded origins in Norman times. It lies in the local government district of the City of Sunderland, administratively in Tyne and Wear, and in the historic county of County Durham. It is situated almost equidistant between the cathedral city of Durham 7 miles (11 kilometres) southwest and Sunderland about 6 mi (10 km) northeast. The town of Seaham and the North Sea lie about 5 mi (8 km) directly east. The villages and towns of Newbottle, Fencehouses and Hetton-le-Hole lie nearby. It has a population of 36,746. Other villages within the Houghton-le-Spring postal district include: Philadelphia, Shiney Row, Chilton Moor and Woodstone Village. The A690 road from Durham to Sunderland meets the A182 in Houghton at an unusual interchange. Heading northeast, slip roads leave the A690, heading up to a roundabout, while the A690 climbs and travels above a second roundabout, before the entry slip joins the A690 itself.

May 23rd
36633 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Whitley Bay

Population 36623

Whitley Bay is a seaside town on the north east coast of England. Historically in Northumberland, it is now part of Tyne and Wear.

May 22nd
36417 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Sheffield Central ward

Population 36412

City ward — which includes the districts of Highfield, Kelham Island and the city centre — is one of the 28 electoral wards in City of Sheffield, England. It covers the central area of the city. The ward was created following the 2015 local government boundary review out of part of the old Central ward, which, with a population of 36,412, was the largest ward in the UK. City is one of the wards that make up the Sheffield Central constituency.

May 21st
36195 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Gorton

Population 36055

(For other uses, see Gorton (disambiguation).) Gorton is an area of the city of Manchester in North West England, southeast of the city centre. The population at the 2011 census was 36,055. Neighbouring areas include Longsight and Levenshulme. A major landmark is Gorton Monastery, a 19th century High Victorian Gothic former Franciscan friary.

May 20th
35958 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Redcar

Population 35692

Redcar is a seaside resort and town in the Tees Valley in North Yorkshire, England. The local council, a unitary authority, is Redcar and Cleveland. Historically part of the North Riding of Yorkshire, it lies 7.5 miles (12.1 km) east-north-east of Middlesbrough by the North Sea coast.The combined population of the wards of Coatham, Dormanstown, Kirkleatham, Newcomen, West Dyke and Zetland was 36,610 in the 2001 census decreasing to 35,692 in the 2011 census.

May 19th
35690 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Shirley, West Midlands

Population 35689

Shirley is a district of the Metropolitan Borough of Solihull, in the county of West Midlands, England. It is a residential and shopping neighbourhood, and a suburb of Solihull.

May 18th
35416 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Bridlington

Population 35369

Bridlington is a coastal town and civil parish on the Holderness Coast of the North Sea, situated in the unitary authority and ceremonial county of the East Riding of Yorkshire approximately 24 miles (39 km) north of Hull. The Gypsey Race river runs through the town and emerges into the North Sea in the town harbour. In the 2011 Census the population of the parish was 35,369. Bridlington is a minor sea fishing port with a working harbour and is well known for its shellfish. It has a mix of small businesses across the manufacturing, retail and service sectors with its prime trade being tourism during the summer months. The origins of the town are uncertain, but archaeological evidence shows habitation in the Bronze Age and in Roman times. The settlement at the Norman conquest was called Bretlinton, but has also gone by the names of Berlington, Brellington and Britlington, before settling on its modern name in the 19th century. The town is twinned with Millau in France and Bad Salzuflen in Germany. One of the UK's coastal weather stations is located at Bridlington. The Priory Church of St Mary and the associated Bayle Gate are Grade I listed buildings. The church stands on the site of the original Augustine Priory.

May 17th
35123 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Yate

Population 35000

Yate is a town and civil parish in South Gloucestershire, England, at the southwest extremity of the Cotswold Hills, 11 miles (17.7 km) northeast of Bristol city centre. Yate developed from a village into a sizable town from the 1960s onwards, partly as an overspill or commuter town for the city of Bristol. Although not a new town in the official sense, Yate took on many of the characteristics of one. At the 2011 census the population was 21,603. The town of Chipping Sodbury (population 5,045) is contiguous with Yate to the east. In addition, a large southern section of the built-up area spills over into the parish of Dodington (population 8,206), and so the total population of Yate's urban area is now approaching 35,000.

May 16th
34857 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Chadderton

Population 34818

Chadderton (pop. 34,818) is a town within the Metropolitan Borough of Oldham, in Greater Manchester, England. It lies along the course of the River Irk and the Rochdale Canal, on undulating land in the foothills of the Pennines, 1 mile (1.6 km) west of Oldham, 4.5 miles (7.2 km) south of Rochdale and 6 miles (9.7 km) northeast of the city of Manchester. Historically part of Lancashire, Chadderton's early history is marked by its status as a manorial township, with its own line of lords and overlords, who included the Asshetons, Chethams, Radclyffes and Traffords. Chadderton in the Middle Ages was chiefly distinguished by its two mansions, Foxdenton Hall and Chadderton Hall, and by the prestigious families who occupied them. Farming was the main industry of the area, with locals supplementing their incomes by hand-loom woollen weaving in the domestic system. Chadderton's urbanisation and expansion largely coincided with developments in textile manufacture during the Industrial Revolution and the Victorian era. A late 19th century factory-building boom transformed Chadderton from a rural township into a major mill town—one of several in its region—and the second most populous urban district in the United Kingdom. More than 50 cotton mills had been built in Chadderton by 1914. Although Chadderton's industries declined during the mid-20th century, the town continued to grow as a result of suburbanisation and urban renewal. The legacy of the town's industrial past remains visible in its landscape of red-brick cotton mills, now used as warehouses or distribution centres. Some of these are listed buildings because of their architectural, historical and cultural significance.

May 15th
34543 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Exmouth

Population 34432

Exmouth /ˈɛksməθ/ is a port town, civil parish and seaside resort in East Devon, England, sited on the east bank of the mouth of the River Exe. In 2011, it had a population of 34,432 making Exmouth the 5th most populous settlement in Devon.

May 14th
34232 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Hyde, Greater Manchester

Population 34003

Hyde is a town in Greater Manchester, England. In 2011, it had a population of 34,003. Historically in Cheshire, it is 5 miles (8 km) northeast of Stockport, 6 miles (10 km) west of Glossop and 7 miles (11 km) east of Manchester.

May 13th
33899 dead in the UK from COVID-19

West Hampstead

Population 33751

West Hampstead is an area in the London Borough of Camden in north-west London. Mainly defined by the railway stations of the same name, it is situated between Childs Hill to the north, Frognal and Hampstead to the north-east, Swiss Cottage to the east, South Hampstead to the south-east, Kilburn to the west and south-west, and Cricklewood to the north-west. The area is mainly residential with several small shops, restaurants, cafes, bakeries concentrated on the northern section of West End Lane and around West End Green. It is served by three stations: (West Hampstead) on the Jubilee line, the West Hampstead Overground station and West Hampstead Thameslink railway station.

May 12th
33583 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Wickford

Population 33486

(For other uses, see Wickford (disambiguation).) Wickford is a town in the south of the English county of Essex, with a population of more than 33,000. Located approximately 30 miles (50 km) east of London, it falls within the Borough of Basildon along with the original town of Basildon, Billericay, Laindon and Pitsea. However, parts of Wickford fall under neighbouring districts such as Chelmsford and Rochford. Wickford has become a commuter town, serving the City of London through its direct connection to Liverpool Street station through the Southend Victoria line, on which a train to London takes approximately 40 minutes. The town can also be easily reached via the road network by the A127 between London and Southend-on-Sea or by the A130 from Chelmsford. Wickford is a fairly small town with a main high street including a range of shops. A swimming pool, a library, an open-air market and a community centre are also within the vicinity of the town centre. Including this, Wickford also incorporates a small estate called Shotgate, home to many residents. Shotgate features a row of village shops and a children's play area and park.

May 11th
33263 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Huyton

Population 33193

Huyton (/ˈhaɪtən/ HY-tən) is a town in the Metropolitan Borough of Knowsley, in Merseyside, England. It is part of the Liverpool Urban Area sharing borders with the Liverpool suburbs of Dovecot, Knotty Ash, Belle Vale and has close associations with its neighbour the village of Roby, both were formerly part of the Huyton with Roby Urban District between 1894 and 1974. Historically in Lancashire, Huyton was an ancient parish which, in the mid-19th century, contained Croxteth Park, Knowsley and Tarbock, in addition to the township of Huyton-with-Roby. It was part of West Derby (hundred), an ancient subdivision of Lancashire, covering the south-west of the county.

May 10th
32955 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Washwood Heath

Population 32921

Washwood Heath is a ward in Birmingham, within the formal district of Hodge Hill, roughly two miles north-east of Birmingham city centre, England. Washwood Heath covers the areas of Birmingham that lie between Nechells, Bordesley Green, Stechford and Hodge Hill.

May 9th
32608 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Brighouse

Population 32360

Brighouse is a town within the Metropolitan Borough of Calderdale, in West Yorkshire, England. Historically within the West Riding of Yorkshire, it is situated on the River Calder, 4 miles (6.4 km) east of Halifax. It is served by Junction 25 of the M62 motorway and Brighouse railway station on the Caldervale Line and Huddersfield Line. In the town centre is a mooring basin on the Calder and Hebble Navigation. The United Kingdom Census 2001 gave the Brighouse / Rastrick subdivision of the West Yorkshire Urban Area a population of 32,360. The Brighouse ward of Calderdale Council gave a population of 11,195 at the 2011 Census. The name Brighouse (or "Bridge House") originates from a building on (or close to) the bridge over the River Calder. In its early history, it was a hamlet of the nearby village of Rastrick. Brighouse is twinned with Lüdenscheid in Germany, the link beginning with an exchange by Brighouse Children's Theatre in 1950 followed by a civic twinning charter in 1960.

May 8th
32230 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Swadlincote

Population 32219

Swadlincote is a town and unparished area in South Derbyshire, approximately 5 miles (8.0 km) southeast of Burton-upon-Trent, 5 miles (8.0 km) northwest of Ashby-de-la-Zouch and about 12.5 miles (20.1 km) due south of Derby. It is the largest town in South Derbyshire and is the seat of South Derbyshire District Council. Swadlincote consists of the settlements of Swadlincote itself plus the districts of Newhall and Midway, and the contiguous suburban villages of Church Gresley and Woodville. Their combined population is about 36,000. The village of Castle Gresley is situated less than 2 miles to the southwest and the community of Albert Village lies 1.5 miles to the south, just within Leicestershire.

May 7th
31849 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Thamesmead

Population 31824

Thamesmead /ˈtɛmzmiːd/ is a town of Greater London, England, located in the London Boroughs of Greenwich and Bexley. It is situated 9.4 miles (15.1 km) east of Charing Cross, and includes a group of disparate developments, mainly social housing, built from the mid-1960s onwards, mostly on former marshland on the south bank of the River Thames, between the established towns of Woolwich and Belvedere. Originally planned to have 60,000-100,000 residents, it is now estimated to be on target for a final population of around 50,000.

May 6th
31389 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Bordesley Green

Population 31343

Bordesley Green is an inner-city area of Birmingham, England about two miles east of the city centre. It also contains a road of the same name. It is also a ward in the formal district of Hodge Hill. Neighbouring areas include, Alum Rock, Saltley, Small Heath and Yardley. Heartlands Hospital is located in the eastern part of Bordesley Green. The area is also served by Yardley Green Medical Centre and Omnia Practice. Kingfisher Country Park covers the River Cole recreation grounds which are partially covered by the area's boundaries.

May 5th
30928 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Pontefract

Population 30881

Pontefract is a historic market town in West Yorkshire, England, near the A1 (or Great North Road) and the M62 motorway. Historically part of the West Riding of Yorkshire, it is one of the five towns in the metropolitan borough of the City of Wakefield and has a population of 28,250, increasing to 30,881 at the 2011 Census. Pontefract's motto is Post mortem patris pro filio, Latin for "After the death of the father, support the son", a reference to English Civil War Royalist sympathies.

May 4th
30465 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Wokingham

Population 30403

Wokingham is a market town in Berkshire, England, 39 miles (63 km) west of London, 7 miles (11 km) southeast of Reading, 8 miles (13 km) north of Camberley and 4 miles (6.4 km) west of Bracknell. At the 2001 census, it had a population of 30,403. Wokingham was a borough before the 1974 reorganisation of local government, when it merged with Wokingham Rural District to form the new Wokingham District. Borough status was granted in 2007.

May 3rd
29982 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Newry

Population 29946

Newry (/ˈnjʊəri/; from Irish: An Iúraigh) is a city in Northern Ireland, 34 miles (55 km) from Belfast and 67 miles (108 km) from Dublin. It had a population of 29,946 in 2011. Newry was founded in 1144 alongside a Cistercian monastery, although there are references to earlier settlements in the area. It is one of Ireland's oldest towns. Newry is at the entry to the "Gap of the North", close to the border with the Republic of Ireland. It grew as a market town and a garrison and became a port in 1742 when it was linked to Lough Neagh by the first summit-level canal built in Ireland or Great Britain. In 2002, as part of Queen Elizabeth's Golden Jubilee celebrations, Newry was granted city status along with Lisburn.

May 2nd
29533 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Sevenoaks

Population 29506

Sevenoaks is a town and civil parish with a population of 29,506 situated in western Kent, England, south-east of London. The population of the civil parish had reduced to 20,409 at the 2011 Census. It is served by a commuter main line railway and is 21 miles (34 km) south-east of London Charing Cross. The town gives its name to the Sevenoaks district, of which it is the principal town, followed by Swanley and Edenbridge. A settlement was recorded in the 13th century, when a market was established. Construction of Knole House in the 15th century helped develop the village. Sevenoaks became part of the modern communications network when one of the early turnpikes was opened in the 18th century; the railway was relatively late in reaching it. In the 21st century, it has a large commuting population, although the nearby Fort Halstead defence installation is a major local employer. Located to the south-east of the town is Knole Park, within which lies Knole House. Educational establishments in the town include the independent Sevenoaks School and Knole Academy.

May 1st
29040 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Cannock

Population 29018

Cannock (/ˈkænək/), as of the 2011 census, has a population of 29,018, and is the most populous of the three towns in the district of Cannock Chase in the central southern part of the county of Staffordshire in the West Midlands region of England. Cannock lies to the north of the West Midlands conurbation on the M6, A34 and A5 roads, and to the south of Cannock Chase, an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB). Cannock is served by a railway station on the Chase Line. The town comprises four district council electoral wards and the Cannock South ward includes the civil parish of Bridgtown, but the rest of Cannock is unparished. Cannock forms part of the Cannock Built-up Area (population 86,121 in the 2011 census) which also includes Cheslyn Hay, Great Wyrley, Hednesford, Huntington, Heath Hayes and Wimblebury.

April 30th
28473 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Wood Green

Population 28453

(For other places with the same name, see Wood Green (disambiguation).) Wood Green is a district of north London, England, in the London Borough of Haringey. It is 6.7 miles (10.8 km) north of Charing Cross, and is west of Tottenham, south of Palmers Green and north of Harringay. The population, comprising the Noel Park and Woodside wards, was 28,453 in the 2011 Census. The London Plan identifies the area as one of the metropolitan centres in Greater London.

April 29th
27925 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Carrickfergus

Population 27903

Carrickfergus known locally and colloquially as "Carrick" (Ulster Scots) (from Irish: Carraig Ḟearġais, meaning "rock of Fergus"), is a large town in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It is located on the north shore of Belfast Lough, 11 miles (18 km) from Belfast. The town had a population of 27,903 at the 2011 Census and takes its name from Fergus Mór mac Eirc, the 6th-century king of Dál Riata. It is County Antrim's oldest town and one of the oldest settlements in Ireland as a whole. Carrickfergus was the administrative centre for Carrickfergus Borough Council, before this was amalgamated into the Mid and East Antrim District Council in 2015, and forms part of the Belfast Metropolitan Area. It is also a townland of 65 acres, a civil parish and a barony. The town is the subject of the classic Irish folk song "Carrickfergus", a 19th-century translation of an Irish-language song (Do Bhí Bean Uasal) from Munster, which begins with the words, "I wish I was in Carrickfergus." The British peerage title of Baron Carrickfergus, which had become extinct in 1883, was bestowed upon Prince William on his wedding day on 29 April 2011.

April 28th
27355 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Longton, Staffordshire

Population 27214

Longton is a southern district of Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, England, one of the six towns of the Potteries which formed the City of Stoke-on-Trent in 1910.

April 27th
26796 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Chichester

Population 26795

Chichester (/ˈtʃɪtʃᵻstər/) is a cathedral city in West Sussex, in South-East England. It is the only city in West Sussex and is its county town. It has a long history as a settlement from Roman times and was important in Anglo-Saxon times. It is the seat of a bishopric, with a 12th-century cathedral, and is home to some of the oldest churches and buildings in Great Britain. Chichester has three tiers of local government. It is a transport hub, and a centre for culture in the county, with a theatre, museum and art galleries. Chichester Harbour and the South Downs provide opportunities for outdoor pursuits.

April 26th
26201 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Burntwood

Population 26049

Burntwood is a town in Staffordshire, England, approximately 4 miles (6 km) west of Lichfield. The town had a population of 26,049 at the time of the 2011 census and forms part of Lichfield district. The town forms one of the largest urbanised parishes in England. Samuel Johnson opened an academy in nearby Edial in 1736. The town is home to the smallest park in the UK, Prince's park, which is located next to Christ Church on the junction of Farewell Lane and Church Road. The town expanded in the nineteenth century around the coal mining industry. Areas of Burntwood are Boney Hay, Chase Terrace, Chasetown, Gorstey Lea and Burntwood Green. Nearby places are Brownhills, Cannock, Cannock Wood, Norton Canes, Gentleshaw, Hammerwich and Lichfield. In September 2009 it was announced that a Burntwood man, Terry Herbert, had discovered a hoard of Saxon treasure with a metal detector in a field in the adjoining village of Hammerwich. Known as the Staffordshire Hoard, it is the largest hoard of Anglo-Saxon gold yet found. Burntwood has 7 primary schools, Fulfen Primary School, Holly Grove Primary School, Boney Hay Primary School, Chasetown Primary School, Springhill Primary school, Chase Terrace Primary School and Ridgeway Primary School. And 2 high schools which are Erasmus Darwin Academy (previously Chasetown Specialist Sports College) and Chase Terrace Technology College. Both schools fell victim to arson attacks in 2002 and 2004. Chasetown High School lost its sports gym facility and most of Chase Terrace High School was destroyed. Both have since been rebuilt.

April 25th
25569 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Newton Abbot

Population 25556

Newton Abbot is a market town and civil parish in the Teignbridge District of Devon, England on the River Teign, with a population of 25,556. Newton Abbot holds a historic Cheese and Onion Fayre in honour of Saint Leonard; it was originally held from 5 to 7 November, but is now celebrated at the beginning of September. The town grew very rapidly in the Victorian era as it was home to the South Devon Railway locomotive works. This later became a major steam engine shed and was retained to service British Railways diesel locomotives, although it closed in 1981 and is now the site of an industrial estate. The town has a racecourse nearby, the most westerly racecourse in Britain, and has a country park, Decoy.

April 24th
24923 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Broadstairs

Population 24903

Broadstairs is a coastal town on the Isle of Thanet in the Thanet district of east Kent, England, about 80 miles (130 km) east of London. It is part of the civil parish of Broadstairs and St Peter's, which includes St Peter's and had a population in 2011 of about 25,000. Situated between Margate and Ramsgate, Broadstairs is one of Thanet's seaside resorts, known as the "Jewel in Thanet's crown". The town's crest motto is Stella Maris ("Star of the Sea"). The name derives from a former flight of steps in the chalk cliff, which led from the sands up to the 11th-century shrine of St Mary on the cliff's summit. The town spreads from Haine Road in the west to Kingsgate (named after the landing of King Charles II in 1683) a hamlet in St Peter parish in the north and to Dumpton in the south (named after the yeoman Dudeman who farmed there in the 13th century). The hamlet of Reading (formerly Reden or Redyng) Street was established by Flemish refugees in the 17th century.

April 23rd
24241 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Farnley, Leeds

Population 24213

Farnley village (also known as New Farnley) is a district in Leeds, West Yorkshire, England, 2 miles (3.2 km) south-west of Leeds city centre, between Wortley, Bramley and the surrounding countryside, in the LS12 Leeds postcode area. The appropriate Leeds City Ward is called Farnley and Wortley with a population of 24,213 according to the 2011 Census. The village was mentioned in the 1086 Domesday Book as Fernelei. New Farnley is a nearby commuter village.

April 22nd
23567 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Chapel Allerton

Population 23536

Chapel Allerton is an inner suburb of north-east Leeds, West Yorkshire, England, 2 miles (3.2 km) from the city centre. The Chapel Allerton electoral ward includes areas otherwise referred to as Chapeltown and Potternewton – the suburb is generally considered to be only the northern part of this. The ward population was given as 18,206 in the 2001 census, increasing to 23,536 at the 2011 Census.

April 21st
22839 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Walton-on-Thames

Population 22834

Walton-on-Thames /ˈwɔːltən ɒn ˈtɛmz/ is a town on the River Thames in the Elmbridge borough of Surrey. An outlying suburb of London, the town is centred 15.3 miles (24.6 km) south west of Charing Cross and is between the towns of Weybridge (to the south-west) and Molesey (to the north-east). Its waterside has the Thames Path National Trail between Sunbury Lock and Shepperton Lock. Its own localities include Ashley Park and Field Common. Its station on the South West Main Line has proven important to its development – its services run with a minimum of one stop before London Waterloo station. The town is divided into four wards and is a local hub in terms of retail and services.

April 20th
22097 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Penarth

Population 22083

Penarth is a town in the Vale of Glamorgan (Welsh: Bro Morgannwg), Wales, 5.2 miles (8.4 km) south west from the city centre of the Welsh capital city of Cardiff and lying on the north shore of the Severn Estuary at the southern end of Cardiff Bay. Penarth is the wealthiest seaside resort in the Cardiff Urban Area, and the second largest town in the Vale of Glamorgan, next only to the administrative centre of Barry. During the Victorian era Penarth was a highly popular holiday destination, promoted nationally as "The Garden by the Sea" and was packed by visitors from the Midlands and the West Country as well as day trippers from the South Wales valleys, mostly arriving by train. Today the town, with its traditional seafront, continues to be a regular summer holiday destination (predominantly for older visitors), but their numbers are much lower than was common from Victorian times until the 1960s, when cheap overseas package holidays were introduced. Although the number of holiday visitors has greatly declined, the town retains a substantial retired population, representing over 25% of residents, but Penarth is now predominantly a dormitory town for Cardiff commuters. The town’s population was recorded as 20,396 in the United Kingdom Census 2001. The town retains extensive surviving Victorian and Edwardian architecture in many traditional parts of the town.

April 19th
21315 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Kennington

Population 21287

(For other places with the same name, see Kennington (disambiguation).) Kennington is a district in London, England, south of the River Thames. It is mainly within the London Borough of Lambeth, running along the boundary with the London Borough of Southwark a boundary which can be discerned from the early medieval period between the Lambeth and St George's parishes of those boroughs respectively. It is located 1.4 miles (2.3 km) south of Charing Cross, in Inner London and is identified as a local centre in the London Plan. It was a royal manor in the ancient parish of St Mary, Lambeth in the county of Surrey and was the administrative centre of the parish from 1853. Proximity to central London was key to the development of the area as a residential suburb and it was incorporated into the metropolitan area of London in 1855. Kennington is the location of three significant London landmarks: the Oval cricket ground, the Imperial War Museum, and Kennington Park. Its population at the United Kingdom Census 2011 was 21,287.

April 18th
20554 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Dumbarton

Population 20527

Dumbarton (/dʌmˈbɑːrtən/; from Scottish Gaelic Dùn Breatann or Dùn Breatainn, meaning "fort of the Britons" pronounced [t̪umˈpɾʲɛʰt̪ɪɲ]) is a town in West Dunbartonshire, Scotland, on the north bank of the River Clyde where the River Leven flows into the Clyde estuary. In 2006, it had an estimated population of 19,990. Dumbarton was the capital of the ancient Kingdom of Alclud, and later the county town of Dunbartonshire.Dumbarton Castle, on top of Dumbarton Rock, dominates the area. Dumbarton was a Royal burgh between 1222 and 1975. Dumbarton emerged from the 19th century as a centre for shipbuilding, glassmaking, and whisky production. However these industries have since declined, and Dumbarton today is increasingly a commuter town for Glasgow 13 miles (21 km) east-southeast of it. Dumbarton F.C. is the local football club. Dumbarton is home to BBC Scotland's drama studios.

April 17th
19755 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Stamford, Lincolnshire

Population 19701

Stamford is a town on the River Welland in Lincolnshire, England, 92 miles (148 km) north of London on the A1. The population at the 2001 census was 21,800 including the adjacent parish of St Martin's Without. The town has 17th and 18th-century stone buildings, older timber-framed buildings and five medieval parish churches. In 2013, Stamford was rated the best place to live by the Sunday Times.

April 16th
18936 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Moss Side

Population 18902

Moss Side is an inner-city area and electoral ward of Manchester, England. It lies 1.9 miles (3.1 km) south of Manchester city centre and had a population of 18,902 at the 2011 census. Moss Side is bounded by the neighbourhoods of Hulme to the north, Chorlton-on-Medlock, Rusholme and Fallowfield to the east, Whalley Range to the south, and Old Trafford to the west. In and around Moss Side are the public parks of Whitworth Park and Alexandra Park. The east of Moss Side is close to the Manchester and Manchester Metropolitan universities and is a popular residential area for students. Between 1923 and 2003, Manchester City played at Maine Road in Moss Side.

April 15th
18098 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Selhurst

Population 18087

Selhurst is a suburban development in the London Borough of Croydon 7.8 miles (12.6 km) south-south-east of Charing Cross. A relatively small area, Selhurst is bounded by South Norwood, Croydon and Thornton Heath. The BRIT School, a performing arts school operated by The BRIT foundation, more commonly known for the BRIT Awards, is located in Selhurst. Selhurst Park, the ground of Crystal Palace Football Club, is sited at the northern end of the neighbourhood. Selhurst is named after the Anglo Saxon for "dwelling in a wood". Evidence of a Saxon settlement was found when the railway station was built. Later, the land was owned by Henry VIII. Heavers Meadow is an open space covering an area of 8.75 acres (0.014 sq mi; 0.035 km2) with a footpath through a flood meadow. The composer Samuel Coleridge-Taylor (1875–1912) lived at 30 Dagnall Park. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle lived on Tennison Road.

April 14th
17220 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Ash, Surrey

Population 17166

Ash is a village and civil parish in the far west of the borough of Guildford, Surrey. Ash is on the eastern side of the River Blackwater, with railway station on the Reading-Guildford-Gatwick line, and direct roads to Aldershot, Farnham and Guildford. The 2011 census counted the residents of the main ward of Ash, which excludes Ash Vale, as 6,120. It is within the Aldershot Urban Area (the Blackwater Valley) and adjoins the riverside in the east of that large town; Ash has a small museum, large secondary school and a library.

April 13th
16361 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Windhill and Wrose

Population 16308

Windhill and Wrose (population 14,541 - 2001 UK census) is a Ward in Bradford Metropolitan District in the county of West Yorkshire, England, named after the districts of Windhill and Wrose around which it is drawn. The population at the 2011 census had increased to 16,408. As well as Windhill and Wrose, the ward includes the districts of Owlet, Bolton Woods, West Royd and Wood End.

April 12th
15468 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Weybridge

Population 15449

(This article is about the town in England. For the settlement in Canada, see Weybridge, Newfoundland and Labrador. For the town in the United States, see Weybridge, Vermont.)(Not to be confused with Wadebridge, Cornwall, or weighbridge.) Weybridge /ˈweɪbrɪdʒ/ is a town by the River Wey in the Elmbridge district of Surrey. It is bounded to the north by the River Thames at the mouth of the Wey, from which it gets its name. It is an outlying suburban town within the Greater London Urban Area, situated 7 miles (11 km) northeast of Woking and 16 miles (25 km) southwest of central London. Real estate prices are well above the national average: as of 2008, six of the ten most expensive streets in South East England (defined as the official government region, which excludes Greater London) were in Weybridge. Weybridge, based on its parish bounds, forms three wards of the United Kingdom or can be divided into the Thames Street and town centre area, the Queens Road area on top of Monument Hill, most of Brooklands and St George's Hill. Within the post town, rather than Weybridge's other boundaries is Oatlands or Oatlands Village.

April 11th
14512 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Anfield, Liverpool

Population 14510

Anfield is a district of Liverpool, Merseyside, England and a Liverpool City Council Ward. The population of the Liverpool Ward at the time of the 2011 census was 14,510. The district is home to 18-time English champions and five-times European champion football club Liverpool F.C. ever since the club's founding in 1892.

April 10th
13557 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Rossington

Population 13557

Rossington is a civil parish and former mining village in the Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster in South Yorkshire, England and is surrounded by countryside and the market towns of Bawtry and Tickhill.

April 9th
12616 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Tividale

Population 12616

Tividale is an area of Sandwell, West Midlands.

April 8th
11618 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Northowram

Population 11618

Northowram is a village in Calderdale, West Yorkshire, England that stands to the east of Halifax on the north side of Shibden valley. Southowram stands on the southern side of the valley. The village was documented in the 19th century as being in the parish of Halifax, 2½ miles north-east of Halifax and 6½ miles from Bradford. Its population at that point was 6,841 and Northowram Hall was the seat of J.F. Dyson, Esq. The ward is now called Northowram and Shelf. The population at the 2011 Census was 11,618. The village today has a total of twenty one shops including a newsagent, a butcher, a mini-supermarket, a cafe, a bakery, a florist, two beauty salons, a barber, two hair salons, a dry cleaner, a chemist, an art gallery, a sandwich shop, a fish and chip shop, a post office, a furniture shop, an optician, a fancy dress shop and a farm shop. The village also has three churches: a Methodist church, a Church of England parish church, and a United Reformed Church. The village has a single school simply named Northowram Primary School. The serial killer John Reginald Halliday Christie was born at Black Boy House near the village in 1899.

April 7th
10545 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Wells, Somerset

Population 10536

Wells (/wɛlz/) is a cathedral city and civil parish in the Mendip district of Somerset, on the southern edge of the Mendip Hills. Although the population recorded in the 2011 census was only 10,536, it has had city status since medieval times, because of the presence of Wells Cathedral. Often described as England's smallest city, it is second only to the City of London in area and population, though not part of a larger urban agglomeration. The name Wells comes from three wells dedicated to Saint Andrew, one in the market place and two within the grounds of the Bishop's Palace and cathedral. A small Roman settlement surrounded them, which grew in importance and size under the Anglo-Saxons when King Ine of Wessex founded a minster church there in 704. The community became a trading centre based on cloth making and Wells is notable for its 17th century involvement in both the English Civil War and Monmouth Rebellion. In the 19th century, transport infrastructure improved with stations on three different railway lines. However, since 1964 the city has been without a railway link. The cathedral and the associated religious and architectural history have made Wells a tourist destination, which provides much of the employment. The city has a variety of sporting and cultural activities and houses several schools including The Blue School, a state coeducational comprehensive school originally founded in 1641 and the independent Wells Cathedral School, which was founded possibly as early as 909 and is one of the five established musical schools for school-age children in the United Kingdom. The historic architecture of the city has also been used as a location for several films and television programmes.

April 6th
9546 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Matlock, Derbyshire

Population 9543

Matlock is the county town of Derbyshire, England. It is situated at the south eastern edge of the Peak District. The town is twinned with the French town Eaubonne. The former spa resort Matlock Bath lies immediately south of the town on the A6. The civil parish of Matlock Town had a population in the 2011 UK census of 9,543. The population of the wider Matlock urban area is approximately 20,000 (including Darley Dale, Tansley, Hackney and Matlock Bath). The Matlock area is considered to include Wirksworth, owing to the close proximity of the towns. This would bring the area's population closer to 30,000. Matlock is nine miles (14 km) south-west of Chesterfield, and in easy reach of the cities of Derby (19 miles), Sheffield (20 miles), and Nottingham (29 miles); the Greater Manchester conurbation is 30 miles away. Matlock is within the Derbyshire Dales district, which also includes the towns of Bakewell and Ashbourne, as well as Wirksworth. The headquarters of Derbyshire County Council are in the town.

April 5th
8654 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Tarring, West Sussex

Population 8646

West Tarring is a neighbourhood of the Borough of Worthing in West Sussex, England. It lies on the A2031 road 1.2 miles (1.9 km) northwest of the town centre. It is officially called West Tarring or, less commonly, Tarring Peverell, to differentiate it from Tarring Neville near Lewes, but is usually called just "Tarring" (pronounced "Ta-ring", not "Tar-ring"). During the time of the Domesday Book in 1086, the village was known as Terringes. It is thought that the place name means 'Teorra's people', with Teorra being a Saxon settler.

April 4th
7740 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Stony Stratford

Population 7735

Stony Stratford (often shortened to Stony) is a constituent town of Milton Keynes (in north Buckinghamshire, England) and is a civil parish with a town council within the Borough of Milton Keynes. It is in the north west corner of Milton Keynes, bordering Northamptonshire and separated from it by the River Great Ouse. Before the designation of Milton Keynes in 1967, Stony was in Wolverton Urban District, north Buckinghamshire. Since at least Roman times, there has been a settlement here at the ford of Watling Street over the Great Ouse. The town's market charter dates from 1194 and its status as a town from 1215.

April 3rd
6836 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Fishtoft

Population 6835

Fishtoft is one of eighteen parishes which, together with Boston, form the Borough of Boston in the county of Lincolnshire, England. Local government has been arranged in this way since the reorganization of 1 April 1974, which resulted from the Local Government Act 1972. This parish forms an electoral ward in itself. Hitherto, the parish had formed part of Boston Rural District, in the Parts of Holland. Holland was one of the three divisions (formally known as parts) of the traditional county of Lincolnshire. Since the Local Government Act of 1888, Holland had been in most respects, a county in itself. The population of the civil parish at the 2011 census was 6,835. The origin of the place-name is from the Old Norse wordtoft meaning a building site or a curtilage. The addition of Fish in the 15th century may be a family name or may indicate a connection with fishing. The place-name appears as Toft in the Domesday Book of 1086 and as Fishtoft in 1416. The parish lies along the north-east side of The Haven and accommodates the Pilgrim Fathers Memorial at Scotia Creek. Fishtoft comprises three aspects - open countryside, the village of Fishtoft, and suburban overspill from Boston. The fields along Burton Croft Road are bounded by dykes which are a home to water voles (an endangered species in the United Kingdom - Fishtoft is one of only 181 sites where voles can still be found). Fishtoft has a school, an Anglican church, a shop (at Hawthron Tree Corner), and football and cricket clubs. The parish church is dedicated to the Saxon saint St Guthlac. The stonework contains traces of Norman work. There is a reference to the church in the Domesday Book. The 18th-century Reading Room, a red brick building just off Rectory Close, is now a private house - it was for many decades used as a centre of learning and education. The historic centre of the village was formerly an island in the tidal marshes - one a of series of islands around the coast of The Wash (each one marked by a medieval church). The parishes along the coast of the Wash had no eastern boundaries, and were continually expanding as new land was reclaimed from the tidal marshes. The marshes produced methane gas which spontaneously ignited to produce flares, giving rise to the belief that they were haunted by spirits and that the new land needed cleansing before it was safe to use. This may account for the veneration of St Guthlac at Fishtoft, the saint being renowned for driving out devils; a medieval statue of St Guthlac can be seen high up on the tower of the Fishtoft parish church, and formerly held the whip with which he cleansed the land of evil spirits. The statue of St Guthlac set into the west tower is of considerable interest. Niklaus Pevsner, in his volume on Lincolnshire (Buildings of England series) says that it is older than the fabric of the tower. It is possible that this is the original statue of the Guthlac cult, and would have been located inside the chancel. As well as the parish church of St Guthlac there was a priory "cell" (or small religious house) on the site of what is now Stoke Priory house on the corner of Gaysfield Road; some remains of the priory cell could be seen in the garden of the house until recently. There was also a small medieval wayside chapel on the western side of Church Green Road, the site indicated by a significant elevation of ground just north of the bungalow opposite The Grange. In addition, the ground at the corner of Clampgate Road and Burton Croft Road, in what is now an open field, formerly held a substantial medieval building, possibly a manor house, called Panels (or Panals) which included a chapel. The arrangement of religious buildings in medieval Fishtoft has given rise to speculation that the village may have been the centre of a cult of St Guthlac based on what is now the parish church, the monks of the priory cell helping to minister to the cult, and the wayside chapel in Church Green Road acting as a "slipper chapel" for pilgrims approaching the village along the permanent road from Boston. The feast of St Guthlac is held on 11 April. Some evidence of a Roman settlement has been found in the area. There was also an important Anglo-Saxon settlement in the area, confirmed by an excavation on what is now Saxon Gardens. At one stage there was a separate hamlet in the parish called Fenne, in the area that later contained the Ball House Inn, Rochford Tower and Hawthorn Tree Corner. This area formed almost a separate community in the 1950s with its own community hall. An important feature of the parish is the Hobhole Drain, constructed in the 19th century for land drainage purposes, which enters the River Witham near the Pilgrim Fathers Memorial. The water tower that formerly stood at the end of Cut End Road has recently been demolished - it was an exact copy of the water tower that still stands in Sutterton.

April 2nd
5997 dead in the UK from COVID-19

New Inn

Population 5986

New Inn is a village and community of approximately 3,000 households located to the south east of Pontypool, within the County Borough of Torfaen in Wales, within the historic boundaries of Monmouthshire.

April 1st
5192 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Edwinstowe

Population 5188

Edwinstowe is a large village and civil parish in the heart of Sherwood Forest, north Nottinghamshire, England, with associations to the Robin Hood and Maid Marian legends. The population of the civil parish at the 2011 Census was 5,188.

March 31st
4425 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Long Stratton

Population 4424

Long Stratton is a civil parish in South Norfolk, in the East of England, UK. It consists of two villages; the larger, Stratton St. Mary, is to the south, and the other, Stratton St. Michael, is to the north. It is home to a substantial population of 4,424(Census 2011).

March 30th
3764 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Lostock Hall

Population 3762

(For other uses, see Lostock (disambiguation).) Lostock Hall /ˌlɒstɒk ˈhɔːl/ is a suburban village within the South Ribble borough of Lancashire, England. It is located on the south side of the River Ribble, some 3 miles (4.8 km) south of Preston and 2.5 miles (4 km) north of Leyland. It is bordered on its southeastern side by the interchange for the M6, M61 and M65 motorways. At the time of the United Kingdom Census 2001, the central Lostock Hall area had a population of 3,948, falling to 3,762 at the 2011 Census Lostock Hall traces its origins to James de Lostock who in 1212 built Lostock's Hall in the then rural area of Cuerden Green in the township of Walton-le-Dale. A settlement expanded outwards from Lostock's Hall, taking its name from the Hall. The former separate community of Tardy Gate is now for all intents and purposes a part of Lostock Hall - it used to be the farming community linking one part of rural Lancashire to another.

March 29th
3179 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Upper Halliford

Population 3173

(For the locality of Lower Halliford or Halliford that is contiguous with Shepperton, see Shepperton.) Upper Halliford is a small linear village, part of the Shepperton post town, in the borough of Spelthorne, Surrey, England within the Metropolitan Green Belt. Its railway station is on the northern boundary and by part of Sunbury on Thames (which remains its Anglican parish) on a branch line from London; the M3 is just beyond. Upper Halliford is within the circle of the M25. Its closest settlements are Shepperton, Charlton and Walton on Thames. The village is partially on and partially by the A244 which alternates here between a dual carriageway and a single carriageway. All of the settled area is however on or beside a single carriageway as the corollary dual carriageway section takes through traffic around the south, village green part of the settlement. Part of this brief dual section has been harmonised to one lane, and Walton Bridge to the south along with almost all of the route is not dualled. No high rise buildings are in the village. Mid-rise flats are near to the village green and it has a conservation area.

March 28th
2672 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Ulnes Walton

Population 2672

Ulnes Walton is a village and civil parish of the Borough of Chorley in Lancashire, England. According to the United Kingdom Census 2001 it has a population of 2,048, increasing to 2,672 at the 2011 Census. The village is also the location of two prisons. Garth Prison, holds Category B adult males, while Wymott Prison holds Category C adult males.

March 27th
2236 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Yalding

Population 2236

Yalding is a village and civil parish in the Borough of Maidstone in Kent, England. The village is situated 6 miles (9.7 km) south west of Maidstone at a point where the Rivers Teise and Beult join the River Medway. At the 2001 census, the parish, which includes the villages of Benover and Laddingford, had a population of 2,236. increasing to 2,418 at the 2011 Census. There are three bridges in the village; the Twyford Bridge (meaning twin ford, where there was originally a double crossing of the two rivers) is one of the finest medieval bridges in the south-east of England. Yalding was one of the principal shipment points on the River Medway for cannon, from villages of the Wealden iron industry. One iron master was John Browne from Horsmonden. The wharf was later used for transporting fruit from the many orchards in the area.

March 26th
1837 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Ballykelly, County Londonderry

Population 1836

Ballykelly (from Irish: Baile Uí Cheallaigh, meaning "O'Kelly's Townland") is a village and townland in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland. It lies 3 miles (4.8 km) west of Limavady on the main Derry to Limavady A2 road and is 15 miles (24 km) east of Derry. It is designated as a Large Village and in 2001 the population of Ballykelly (excluding Walworth) was 1,827. It lies within Causeway Coast and Glens district.

March 25th
1478 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Wentworth, South Yorkshire

Population 1478

Wentworth is a village and civil parish in the Metropolitan Borough of Rotherham in South Yorkshire, England. In the 2001 Census the village had a population of 1,223, increasing to 1,478 at the 2011 Census.

March 24th
1176 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Carbrooke

Population 1176

Carbrooke is a village and civil parish in the Breckland district of mid-Norfolk, East Anglia, England in the United Kingdom. It is 3 miles (4.8 km) from the centre of Watton, 8 miles (13 km) from Dereham and 17 miles (27 km) from its postal town of Thetford. It has an area of 12.66 km2 (4.89 sq mi) with an estimated population of 1,310 in 2007. The measured population at the Census 2011 was 2,076. It has a village hall, with plans for a new one, hosting among other things The Village Social Group. The local church is St Peter & St Paul in the Benefice of Watton. The local school is St Peter & St Paul VC Primary School.

March 23rd
939 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 22nd
753 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 21st
588 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 20th
457 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 19th
348 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 18th
274 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 17th
206 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 16th
154 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 15th
108 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 14th
76 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 13th
54 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 12th
38 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 11th
25 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 10th
17 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 9th
14 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 8th
9 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 7th
6 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 6th
6 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 5th
6 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 4th
3 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 3rd
3 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 2nd
1 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 1st
0 dead in the UK from COVID-19
February 29th
0 dead in the UK from COVID-19
February 29th
0 dead in the UK from COVID-19

(not showing places with less than 1000 population)