UK COVID Death in perspective

This page shows the death total in the UK compared to the sizes of UK cities (according to Wikipedia)

April 8th
127040 dead in the UK from COVID-19
April 7th
127028 dead in the UK from COVID-19
April 6th
127005 dead in the UK from COVID-19
April 5th
126987 dead in the UK from COVID-19
April 4th
126973 dead in the UK from COVID-19
April 3rd
126955 dead in the UK from COVID-19
April 2nd
126930 dead in the UK from COVID-19
April 1st
126907 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 31st
126879 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 30th
126845 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 29th
126808 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 28th
126775 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 27th
126743 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 26th
126707 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 25th
126661 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 24th
126617 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 23rd
126582 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 22nd
126531 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 21st
126470 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 20th
126392 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 19th
126327 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 18th
126259 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 17th
126199 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 16th
126121 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 15th
126042 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 14th
125949 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 13th
125856 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 12th
125754 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 11th
125661 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 10th
125541 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 9th
125428 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 8th
125293 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 7th
125149 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 6th
125020 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 5th
124868 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 4th
124699 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 3rd
124545 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 2nd
124399 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 1st
124218 dead in the UK from COVID-19
February 28th
123993 dead in the UK from COVID-19
February 27th
123781 dead in the UK from COVID-19
February 26th
123555 dead in the UK from COVID-19
February 25th
123332 dead in the UK from COVID-19
February 24th
123074 dead in the UK from COVID-19
February 23rd
122804 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Preston, Lancashire

Population 122719

Preston /ˈprɛstən/ is a city and the administrative centre of Lancashire, England. On the north bank of the River Ribble, it is an urban settlement and unparished area that together with surrounding rural civil parishes forms the City of Preston local government district of Lancashire. The district obtained city status in 2002, becoming England's 50th city in the 50th year of Queen Elizabeth II's reign. Preston has a population of 114,300, the City of Preston district 132,000 and the Preston Built-up Area 313,322. The Preston Travel To Work Area, in 2011, had a population of 420,661 compared to 354,000 in the previous census. Preston and its surrounding area have provided evidence of ancient Roman activity, largely in the form of a Roman road which led to a camp at Walton-le-Dale. The Angles established Preston; its name is derived from the Old English meaning "priest's settlement" and in the Domesday Book is recorded as "Prestune". In the Middle Ages, Preston was a parish and township in the hundred of Amounderness and was granted a Guild Merchant charter in 1179, giving it the status of a market town. Textiles have been produced since the mid-13th century when locally produced wool was woven in people's houses. Flemish weavers who settled in the area in the 14th century helped develop the industry. In the early-18th century, Edmund Calamy described Preston as "a pretty town with an abundance of gentry in it, commonly called Proud Preston". Sir Richard Arkwright, inventor of the spinning frame, was born in the town. The most rapid period of growth and development coincided with the industrialisation and expansion of textile manufacturing. Preston was a boomtown of the Industrial Revolution, becoming a densely populated engineering centre, with large industrial plants. The town's textile sector fell into terminal decline from the mid-20th century and Preston has subsequently faced similar challenges to other post-industrial northern towns, including deindustrialisation, economic deprivation and housing issues. Preston is the seat of Lancashire County Council, houses the main campus of the University of Central Lancashire (UCLan) and is home to Preston North End F.C., a founder member of the Football League and the first English football champions.

February 22nd
122518 dead in the UK from COVID-19
February 21st
122236 dead in the UK from COVID-19
February 20th
121912 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Colchester

Population 121859

Colchester /ˈkoʊltʃɛstər/is a historic town and the largest settlement within the borough of Colchester in Essex, England. At the time of the census in 2011, it had a population of 121,859, marking a considerable rise from the previous census and with considerable development since 2001 and ongoing building plans; it has been named as one of Britain's fastest growing towns. As the oldest recorded Roman town in Britain, Colchester is claimed to be the oldest town in Britain. It was for a time the capital of Roman Britain, and is a member of the Most Ancient European Towns Network. Colchester is 51.2 miles (82.4 km) northeast of London and is connected to the capital by the A12 road and the Great Eastern Main Line. It is seen as a popular town for commuters, and is less than 30 miles (48 km) away from Stansted Airport and 20 miles (32 km) from the passenger ferry port of Harwich. Colchester is home to Colchester Castle and Colchester United Football Club. It has a Conservative Member of Parliament, Will Quince, who was elected in the 2015 General Election. The correct demonym is Colcestrian. The River Colne runs through the town.

February 19th
121567 dead in the UK from COVID-19
February 18th
121187 dead in the UK from COVID-19
February 17th
120772 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Lisburn

Population 120465

Lisburn (/ˈlɪz.bərn/ or /ˈlɪs.bərn/) is a city in Northern Ireland. It is 8 mi (13 km) southwest of Belfast, on the River Lagan, which forms the boundary between County Antrim and County Down. Lisburn forms part of the Belfast Metropolitan Area. It had a population of 71,465 people in the 2011 Census. Formerly a borough, Lisburn was granted city status in 2002 as part of Queen Elizabeth II's Golden jubilee celebrations. It is the third-largest city in Northern Ireland. Lisburn is one of the constituent cities that make up the Dublin-Belfast corridor region which has a population of just under 3 million.

February 16th
120344 dead in the UK from COVID-19

High Wycombe

Population 120256

High Wycombe (/ˌhaɪ ˈwɪkəm/), often referred to as Wycombe, is a large town in Buckinghamshire, England. It is 29 miles (47 km) west north west of Charing Cross in London; this information is also engraved on the Corn Market building in the centre of the town. It is also 17 miles (27 km) south of the county town of Aylesbury, 27 miles (43 km) southeast of Oxford and 9 miles (14 km) north of Maidenhead. According to the 2011 census High Wycombe has a population of 120,256 making it the second largest town in the county of Buckinghamshire after Milton Keynes. High Wycombe Urban Area, the conurbation of which the town is the largest component, has a population of 133,204. High Wycombe is mostly an unparished area in the Wycombe district. Part of the urban area constitutes the civil parish of Chepping Wycombe, which had a population of 14,455 according to the 2001 census – this parish represents that part of the ancient parish of Chepping Wycombe which was outside the former municipal borough of Wycombe. Wycombe is a combination of industrial and market town, with a traditional emphasis on furniture production. There has been a market held in the High Street since at least the Middle Ages.

February 15th
119900 dead in the UK from COVID-19
February 14th
119384 dead in the UK from COVID-19
February 13th
118893 dead in the UK from COVID-19
February 12th
118403 dead in the UK from COVID-19
February 11th
117878 dead in the UK from COVID-19
February 10th
117309 dead in the UK from COVID-19
February 9th
116703 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Winchester

Population 116600

Winchester is a city and the county town of Hampshire, England. The city lies at the heart of the wider City of Winchester, a local government district, and is located at the western end of the South Downs National Park, along the course of the River Itchen. It is situated 61 miles (98 km) south-west of London and 13.6 miles (21.9 km) from Southampton, its closest city. At the time of the 2011 Census, Winchester had a population of 45,184. The wider City of Winchester district which includes towns such as Alresford and Bishop's Waltham has a population of 116,800 Winchester developed from the Roman town of Venta Belgarum, which in turn developed from an Iron Age oppidum. Winchester's major landmark is Winchester Cathedral, one of the largest cathedrals in Europe, with the distinction of having the longest nave and overall length of all Gothic cathedrals in Europe. The city is home to the University of Winchester and Winchester College, the oldest public school in the United Kingdom still to be using its original buildings.

February 8th
116100 dead in the UK from COVID-19
February 7th
115415 dead in the UK from COVID-19
February 6th
114785 dead in the UK from COVID-19
February 5th
114085 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Ealing

Population 113777

Ealing (/ˈiːlɪŋ/) is a major suburban district of west London, England and the administrative centre of the London Borough of Ealing. It is located 7.9 miles (12.7 km) west of Charing Cross and around 12 miles (19.3 km) from the City of London. It is one of the major metropolitan centres identified in the London Plan. It was historically a rural village in the county of Middlesex and formed an ancient parish. Improvement in communications with London, culminating with the opening of the railway station in 1838, shifted the local economy to market garden supply and eventually to suburban development. As part of the growth of London in the 20th century, Ealing significantly expanded and increased in population, becoming a municipal borough in 1901 and has formed part of Greater London since 1965. It now forms a significant commercial and retail centre with a developed night time economy. Ealing has the characteristics of both suburban and inner-city developments. Ealing's town centre is often colloquial with Ealing Broadway. Most of Ealing, including the commercial district, South Ealing, Ealing Common, Montpelier, Pitshanger and most of Hanger Hill fall under the W5 postcode. Areas to the north-west of the town centre such as Argyle Road and West Ealing fall under W13 instead. A small section north-east of the town centre, near Hanger Hill, falls under the NW10 postcode area. The population of Ealing (not including Hanwell and Northfields), comprising the Ealing Broadway, Ealing Common, Cleveland, Walpole and Hanger Hill wards, was 71,492 in the 2011 census. The area of Hanwell is strongly associated with Ealing; however, it is a separate district with its own postcode. Northfields on the other hand, despite sharing postcodes with Ealing is generally considered to be a separate area in its own right.

February 4th
113337 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Maidstone

Population 113137

(For other uses, see Maidstone (disambiguation).) Maidstone is the county town of Kent, England, 32 miles (51 km) south-east of London. The River Medway runs through the centre of the town, linking it with Rochester and the Thames Estuary. Historically, the river was a source and route for much of the town's trade as the centre of the agricultural county of Kent, known as the Garden of England. There is evidence of a settlement in the area dating back to before the Stone Age. The town is in the borough of Maidstone. In 2011, the town had a population of 113,137, about 73 per cent of the population of the borough. Maidstone's economy has changed over the years from being involved in heavy industry, to more light industry and service industries.

February 3rd
112620 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Chipping Barnet

Population 111973

Chipping Barnet or High Barnet is a market town in the London Borough of Barnet, England. It is a suburban development built around a 12th-century settlement, and is located 10 1⁄2 miles (17 km) north north-west of Charing Cross, east from Borehamwood, west from Enfield and south from Potters Bar. Its name is very often abbreviated to just Barnet, which is also the name of the borough of which it forms a part. Chipping Barnet is also the name of the Parliamentary constituency covering the local area - the word "Chipping" denotes the presence of a market, one that was established here at the end of the 12th century and persists to this day. Chipping Barnet is one of the highest-lying urban settlements in London, with the town centre having an elevation of about 427 feet (130 m).

February 2nd
111765 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Chelmsford

Population 111511

Chelmsford (/ˈtʃɛlmzfəd/) is the principal settlement of the City of Chelmsford and the county town of Essex, in the East of England. It is located in the London commuter belt, approximately 32 miles (51 km) northeast of Charing Cross, London, and approximately 22 miles (35 km) from Colchester. The urban area of the city has a population of approximately 120,000, whilst the district has a population of 168,310. The main conurbation of Chelmsford incorporates all or part of the former parishes of Broomfield, Great Baddow, Galleywood, Writtle, Moulsham, Widford and Springfield, including Springfield Barnes, now known as Chelmer Village. The communities of Chelmsford, Massachusetts, Chelmsford, Ontario, and Chelmsford, New Brunswick, are named after the city. Chelmsford's population consists of a large number of City and Docklands commuters, attracted by the 30–35 minute journey from Central London via the Great Eastern Main Line. The same journey takes approximately 60 minutes by road via the A12. On 14 March 2012, Lord President of the Privy Council and Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg announced that Chelmsford, along with Perth, Scotland and St Asaph, Wales, was to be granted city status. The Letters Patent officially granting city status to Chelmsford from The Queen were received on 6 June 2012. The demonym for a Chelmsford resident is "Chelmsfordian".

February 1st
110919 dead in the UK from COVID-19
January 31st
110029 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Doncaster

Population 109805

Doncaster (/ˈdɒŋkəstər/ or /ˈdɒŋkæstər/), is a large market town in South Yorkshire, England. Together with its surrounding suburbs and settlements, the town forms part of the Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster, which had a mid-2014 est. population of 304,185. The town itself has a population of 109,805. Doncaster is about 20 miles (30 km) from Sheffield, with which it is served jointly by an international airport, Robin Hood Airport Doncaster Sheffield in Finningley. The Doncaster Urban Area had a population of 158,141 in 2011 and includes Doncaster and the neighbouring small town of Bentley as well as some other villages.

January 30th
109141 dead in the UK from COVID-19
January 29th
108231 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Rochdale

Population 107926

Rochdale /ˈrɒtʃdeɪl/ is a market town in Greater Manchester, England, positioned at the foothills of the South Pennines on the River Roch, 5.3 miles (8.5 km) north-northwest of Oldham, and 9.8 miles (15.8 km) north-northeast of the city of Manchester. Rochdale is surrounded by several smaller settlements which together form the Metropolitan Borough of Rochdale, population 211,699. Rochdale is the largest settlement and administrative centre, with a total population of 107,926. Historically a part of Lancashire, Rochdale's recorded history begins with an entry in the Domesday Book of 1086 under Recedham Manor. The ancient parish of Rochdale was a division of the hundred of Salford and one of the largest ecclesiastical parishes in England comprising several townships. By 1251, Rochdale had become important enough to have been granted a Royal charter. Subsequently, Rochdale flourished into a centre of northern England's woollen trade, and by the early 18th century was described as being "remarkable for many wealthy merchants". Rochdale rose to prominence during the 19th century as a major mill town and centre for textile manufacture during the Industrial Revolution. It was a boomtown of the Industrial Revolution, and amongst the first ever industrialised towns. The Rochdale Canal—one of the major navigable broad canals of the United Kingdom—was a highway of commerce during this time used for the haulage of cotton, wool and coal to and from the area. The socioeconomic change brought by the success of Rochdale's textile industry in the 19th century led to its rise to borough status and it remained a dominant settlement in its region. However, during the 20th century Rochdale's spinning capacity declined towards an eventual halt. Rochdale is commonly cited as the birthplace of the modern Co-operative Movement, to which more than one billion people worldwide belonged in 2012. The Rochdale Equitable Pioneers Society was founded in 1844 by 28 local residents as a response to the high cost and frequent adulteration of basic foodstuffs by shopkeepers at the time. The Pioneers were notable for combining the notion of the patronage dividend alongside investing trading surplus for member benefit, especially in education. The Rochdale Principles, the set of ideals which underpinned the society, are still used, in updated form, by the International Co-operative Alliance to this day. The Rochdale Pioneers shop was the precursor to The Co-operative Group, the largest consumer co-operative in the world. Rochdale today is a predominantly residential town. Rochdale Town Hall—a Grade I listed building—dates from 1871 and is one of the United Kingdom's finest examples of Victorian Gothic revival architecture.

January 28th
107160 dead in the UK from COVID-19
January 27th
106054 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Darlington

Population 106000

Darlington is a market town in County Durham, in North East England, and part of the Tees Valley. With a population of 106,000 in 2011, the town lies on the River Skerne, a tributary of the River Tees. The town owes much of its development to the influence of local Quaker families in the Victorian era, and is famous as the terminus of Stockton and Darlington Railway, the world's first passenger railway. The town is often colloquially referred to as 'Darlo'.

January 26th
104942 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Worthing

Population 104600

Worthing (/ˈwɜːrðɪŋ/ WERDH-ing) is a large seaside town in England, with borough status in West Sussex, in the historic county of Sussex. It is situated at the foot of the South Downs, 10 miles (16 km) west of Brighton, and 18 miles (29 km) east of the county town of Chichester. With an estimated population of 104,600 and an area of 12.5 square miles (32.37 km2) the borough is the second largest component of the Brighton/Worthing/Littlehampton conurbation, which makes it part of the 15th most populous urban area in the United Kingdom. The area around Worthing has been populated for at least 6,000 years and contains Britain's greatest concentration of Stone Age flint mines, which are some of the earliest mines in Europe. Lying within the borough, the Iron Age hill fort of Cissbury Ring is one of Britain's largest. Worthing means "(place of) Worth/Worō's people", from the Old English personal name Worth/Worō (the name means "valiant one, one who is noble"), and -ingas "people of" (reduced to -ing in the modern name). For many centuries Worthing was a small mackerel fishing hamlet until in the late 18th century it developed into an elegant Georgian seaside resort and attracted the well-known and wealthy of the day. In the 19th and 20th centuries the area was one of Britain's chief market gardening centres. Modern Worthing has a large service industry, particularly in financial services. It has three theatres and one of Britain's oldest cinemas. Writers Oscar Wilde and Harold Pinter lived and worked in the town.

January 25th
103884 dead in the UK from COVID-19
January 24th
102718 dead in the UK from COVID-19

St Helens, Merseyside

Population 102629

St Helens () is a large town in Merseyside, England. It is the largest settlement and administrative centre of the Metropolitan Borough of St Helens with a population of 102,629, while the entire metropolitan borough had a population of 176,843 at the 2001 Census. The town was incorporated as a municipal borough in 1868, responsible for the administration of four townships, Eccleston, Parr, Sutton and Windle, and as a county borough in 1887 (superseded in 1974 by the metropolitan borough). St Helens is in the south west of the historic county of Lancashire in North West England, 6 miles (10 km) north of the River Mersey. The town historically lay within the ancient Lancashire division of West Derby known as a "hundred". The area developed rapidly in the Industrial Revolution of the 18th and 19th centuries into a significant centre for coal mining and glassmaking. It was also home to a cotton and linen industry (notably sail making) that lasted until the mid-19th century as well as salt, lime and alkali pits, copper smelting, and brewing. Glass producer Pilkington is the town's one remaining large industrial employer. Previously the town had been home to Beechams, the Gamble Alkali Works, Ravenhead glass, United Glass Bottles, Triplex, Daglish Foundry, and Greenall's brewery.

January 23rd
101564 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Eastbourne

Population 101547

Eastbourne () is a large town, seaside resort and borough in the non-metropolitan county of East Sussex on the south coast of England, 19 miles (31 km) east of Brighton. Eastbourne is immediately to the east of Beachy Head, the highest chalk sea cliff in Great Britain. With a seafront consisting largely of Victorian hotels, a pier and a Napoleonic era fort and military museum, Eastbourne was developed by the Duke of Devonshire from 1859 from four separate hamlets. It has a growing population, a broad economic base and is home to companies in a wide range of industries. Though Eastbourne is a relatively new town, there is evidence of human occupation in the area from the Stone Age. The town grew as a fashionable tourist resort largely thanks to prominent landowner, William Cavendish, later to become the Duke of Devonshire. Cavendish appointed architect Henry Currey to design a street plan for the town, but not before sending him to Europe to draw inspiration. The resulting mix of architecture is typically Victorian and remains a key feature of Eastbourne. As a seaside resort, Eastbourne derives a large and increasing income from tourism, with revenue from traditional seaside attractions augmented by conferences, public events and cultural sightseeing. The other main industries in Eastbourne include trade and retail, healthcare, education, construction, manufacturing, professional scientific and the technical sector. Eastbourne's population is growing; between 2001 and 2011 it increased from 89,800 to 99,412. The 2011 census shows that the average age of residents has decreased as the town has attracted students, families and those commuting to London and Brighton.

January 22nd
100405 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Wythenshawe

Population 100000

Wythenshawe (/ˈwɪðənʃɔː/; pop. 100,000) is a district of south Manchester, England. Historically in Cheshire, in 1931 Wythenshawe was transferred to the City of Manchester, which had begun building a massive housing estate there in the 1920s. With an area of approximately 11 square miles (28 km2), at one time Wythenshawe was the largest council housing estate in Europe, although private home ownership in the area has grown. The district comprises nine areas: Baguley, Benchill, Peel Hall, Newall Green, Woodhouse Park, Moss Nook, Northern Moor, Northenden, and Sharston. The boundaries of these areas have changed throughout the district's history, and previously known areas such as Brownley Green and Crossacres have since been assimilated into one of the areas listed, though many residents still refer to them by name.

January 21st
99166 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Bootle

Population 98449

Bootle (pronounced /ˈbuːtəl/) is a town within the Metropolitan Borough of Sefton in Merseyside. The town was formerly known as Bootle-cum-Linacre and has a total resident population of 77,640. Historically in Lancashire, Bootle's economy has been centred on the docks and their associated industries for decades.

January 20th
97929 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Great Yarmouth

Population 97277

Great Yarmouth, often known to locals as Yarmouth, is a coastal town in Norfolk, England. It is located at the mouth of the River Yare, 20 miles (30 km) east of Norwich. The town has been a seaside resort since 1760, and is the gateway from the Norfolk Broads to the North Sea. For hundreds of years it was a major fishing port, depending mainly on the herring fishery, but its fishing industry suffered a steep decline in the second half of the 20th century, and has now all but disappeared. The discovery of oil in the North Sea in the 1960s led to a flourishing oil rig supply industry, and today it services offshore natural gas rigs. More recently, the development of renewable energy sources, especially offshore wind power, has created further opportunities for support services. A wind farm of 30 generators is within sight of the town on the Scroby Sands. The town has a beach and two piers.

January 19th
96635 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Oldham

Population 96555

Oldham /ˈɒldəm/ is a town in Greater Manchester, England, amid the Pennines between the rivers Irk and Medlock, 5.3 miles (8.5 km) south-southeast of Rochdale and 6.9 miles (11.1 km) northeast of Manchester. Together with several smaller surrounding towns, it is part of the Metropolitan Borough of Oldham of which it is the administrative centre. Historically in Lancashire, and with little early history to speak of, Oldham rose to prominence in the 19th century as an international centre of textile manufacture. It was a boomtown of the Industrial Revolution, and among the first ever industrialised towns, rapidly becoming "one of the most important centres of cotton and textile industries in England". At its zenith, it was the most productive cotton spinning mill town in the world, producing more cotton than France and Germany combined. Oldham's textile industry fell into decline in the mid-20th century; the town's last mill closed in 1998. The demise of textile processing in Oldham depressed the local economy. Today Oldham is a predominantly residential town, and a centre for further education and the performing arts. It is, however, still distinguished architecturally by the surviving cotton mills and other buildings associated with that industry. The town has a population of 103,544 and an area of around 26 square miles (67 km2).

January 18th
95275 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Sutton Coldfield

Population 95107

The Royal Town of Sutton Coldfield (), more colloquially known as Sutton Coldfield or simply Sutton, is a town and civil parish in Birmingham, England, forming a suburb of the city. The town lies about 6.5 miles (10 km) northeast of Birmingham City Centre and borders Little Aston, North Warwickshire, Lichfield, Erdington and South Staffordshire. Its 2011 Census population was 95,107 – a fall of 4.8% since the 2001 Census. Historically in Warwickshire, it became part of Birmingham and the West Midlands metropolitan county in 1974. An affluent town ranked as the fourth least deprived area in the country encompassing the prestigious Four Oaks Park Estate and bordering the Little Aston private estate where the region's multi-millionaire and billionaires reside.

January 17th
93979 dead in the UK from COVID-19
January 16th
92713 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Hartlepool

Population 92000

Hartlepool (/ˈhɑːrtlᵻpuːl/) is a town in County Durham on the North Sea coast of North East England, 7.5 miles (12 km) north of Middlesbrough and 17 miles (27 km) south of Sunderland. The Borough of Hartlepool includes outlying villages such as Seaton Carew, Greatham and Elwick. Hartlepool was founded in the 7th century AD, around the Northumbrian monastery of Hartlepool Abbey. The village grew in the Middle Ages and its harbour served as the official port of the County Palatine of Durham. After a railway link from the north was established from the South Durham coal fields, an additional link from the south, in 1835, together with a new port, resulted in further expansion, with the new town of West Hartlepool. Industrialisation and the start of a shipbuilding industry in the later part of the 19th century caused Hartlepool to be a target for the Imperial German Navy at the beginning of the First World War. A bombardment of 1,150 shells on 16 December 1914 resulted in the death of 117 people. A severe decline in heavy industries and shipbuilding following the Second World War caused periods of high unemployment until the 1990s when major investment projects and the redevelopment of the docks area into a marina saw a rise in the town's prospects.

January 15th
91414 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Barnsley

Population 91297

Barnsley (/ˈbɑːrnzli/, locally ['baːnzlɛ]) is a large town in South Yorkshire, England, located halfway between Leeds and Sheffield. Historically in the West Riding of Yorkshire, it lies on the River Dearne. Barnsley is surrounded by several smaller settlements which together form the Metropolitan Borough of Barnsley, of which Barnsley is the largest and its administrative centre. At the 2011 Census, Barnsley had a population of 91,297. Barnsley is a former industrial town centred on coal mining and glassmaking. Although both industries declined in the 20th century, Barnsley's culture is rooted in its industrial heritage and it has a tradition of brass bands, originally created as social clubs by its mining communities. It is also home of the Barnsley chop. The town is accessed from junctions 36, 37 and 38 of the M1 motorway and has a railway station on the Hallam and Penistone Lines. Barnsley F.C. is the local football club.

January 14th
90191 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Wembley

Population 90045

Wembley (/ˈwɛmbli/) is an area of northwest London, England, and part of the London Borough of Brent. It is home to the Wembley Arena and Wembley Stadium. Wembley formed a separate civil parish from 1894 and was incorporated as a municipal borough in 1937. In 1965, the area merged with the Municipal Borough of Willesden to create the London Borough of Brent, and has since formed part of Greater London.

January 13th
88966 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Bath, Somerset

Population 88859

Bath (/ˈbɑːθ/ or /ˈbæθ/) is a city in the ceremonial county of Somerset, England, known for its Roman-built baths. In 2011, the population was 88,859. Bath is in the valley of the River Avon, 97 miles (156 km) west of London and 11 miles (18 km) south-east of Bristol. The city became a World Heritage Site in 1987. The city became a spa with the Latin name Aquæ Sulis ("the waters of Sulis") c. AD 60 when the Romans built baths and a temple in the valley of the River Avon, although hot springs were known even before then. Bath Abbey was founded in the 7th century and became a religious centre; the building was rebuilt in the 12th and 16th centuries. In the 17th century, claims were made for the curative properties of water from the springs, and Bath became popular as a spa town in the Georgian era. Georgian architecture, crafted from Bath stone, includes the Royal Crescent, Circus, Pump Room and Assembly Rooms where Beau Nash presided over the city's social life from 1705 until his death in 1761. Many of the streets and squares were laid out by John Wood, the Elder, and in the 18th century the city became fashionable and the population grew. Jane Austen lived in Bath in the early 19th century. Further building was undertaken in the 19th century and following the Bath Blitz in World War II. The city has software, publishing and service-oriented industries. Theatres, museums, and other cultural and sporting venues have helped make it a major centre for tourism with more than one million staying visitors and 3.8 million day visitors to the city each year. There are several museums including the Museum of Bath Architecture, Victoria Art Gallery, Museum of East Asian Art, and the Holburne Museum. The city has two universities: the University of Bath and Bath Spa University, with Bath College providing further education. Sporting clubs include Bath Rugby and Bath City F.C. while TeamBath is the umbrella name for all of the University of Bath sports teams. Bath became part of the county of Avon in 1974, and, following Avon's abolition in 1996, has been the principal centre of Bath and North East Somerset.

January 12th
87755 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Fulham

Population 87161

Fulham (/ˈfʊləm/) is part of the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham, in southwest London. It is an Inner London district located 3.7 miles (6.0 km) south-west of Charing Cross. It lies on the north bank of the River Thames, between Hammersmith and Kensington and Chelsea, facing Putney and Barnes and is bounded on the east by the West London Line, previously the course of a canal and creek. It was formerly a parish in the County of Middlesex. The area is identified in the London Plan as one of 35 major centres in Greater London. Until 1965 the former Metropolitan Borough of Fulham incorporated the areas of Sands End, Hurlingham, North End (Lillie), Baron's Court (Margravine), West Kensington, Fulham Broadway (Walham), 'Munstervillage' (Town) and along Fulham Palace Road. Fulham Palace, now a museum, served between 1900 and 1976 as the official residence of the Bishops of London. Fulham has a history of industrial enterprise dating back to the 15th-century, in the shape of its Mill at Millshot, on the south-side of what is now Fulham Palace Road. This was followed by pottery, tapestry-weaving (the Gobelins Manufactory had established a branch in London in the 1700s), paper-making and brewing in the 17th and 18th-centuries all in the area of present-day Fulham High Street. The next two centuries saw involvement with energy production, transportation, the automotive industry, including early aviation and food production, (MacFarlane Lang Biscuits) and laundries. In contrast to its modest post-WW2 reputation, Fulham is now considered among the "prime" London areas by estate agents. Two football clubs, the eponymous Fulham F.C. and Premier League rivals, Chelsea F.C., are situated within Fulham, as are two exclusive sporting clubs, the Hurlingham club known for Polo and the Queen's tennis club known for its annual pre-Wimbledon Tennis tournament. In the 1800s Lillie Bridge Grounds, (currently beneath the rising 'Lillie Square' residential development), hosted the first meetings of the Amateur Athletic Association of England, the second FA Cup Final and the first ever amateur boxing matches. The Lillie Bridge area was also the former home-ground of the Middlesex County Cricket Club, before it moved to Marylebone. The Lillie Bridge Depot a railway engineering and stabling depot, opened 1872, heralded the arrival of the railway transport boom in London and was closely involved with the building and extensions of the London Underground network in the capital. It was associated with the electrification of the tube lines from the nearby Lots Road Power Station, just over the borough border in Chelsea and for well over a century, it has been the maintenance hub for the rolling stock and track. It is to be decommissioned by 2019.

January 11th
86547 dead in the UK from COVID-19
January 10th
85415 dead in the UK from COVID-19
January 9th
84319 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Stockton-on-Tees

Population 83490

Stockton-on-Tees is a market town in the ceremonial county of County Durham, North East England. It is the major settlement in the borough of Stockton-on-Tees. The town sits within the Tees Valley region of the North East of England, and the wider borough had a population of 191,000 in 2011 estimates.

January 8th
83303 dead in the UK from COVID-19
January 7th
82322 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Halifax, West Yorkshire

Population 82056

Halifax is a minster town in the Metropolitan Borough of Calderdale in West Yorkshire, England. The town has been a centre of woollen manufacture from the 15th century onward, originally dealing through the Piece Hall. Halifax is known for Mackintosh's chocolate and toffee products including Rolo and Quality Street. The Halifax Bank and Yorkshire Bank were also founded in Halifax. Dean Clough, one of the largest textile factories in the world at more than 1⁄2 mile (800 m) long, was in the north of the town. The premises have since been converted for office and retail use including a gym, theatre, Travelodge and radio station.

January 6th
81328 dead in the UK from COVID-19
January 5th
80397 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Harrow, London

Population 80213

Harrow /ˈhæroʊ/ is a large suburban town in the London Borough of Harrow, northwest London, England. It is centred 10.5 miles (16.9 km) northwest of Charing Cross. Harrow-on-the-Hill includes the conservation area with a high proportion of listed buildings with a residential and institutional array of Georgian architecture and a few 17th century examples. Harrow gives its initial letters to a wider postcode area. The administrative offices of the borough are in the town which currently is made up of the Greenhill, Headstone South and West Harrow electoral wards; these had a population of 33,928 in the 2011 census. Harrow was a municipal borough of Middlesex before its inclusion in Greater London in 1965. Harrow is home to a large Westminster polytechnic campus and its oldest secondary schools are Harrow School and Harrow High School.

January 4th
79488 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Dudley

Population 79379

Dudley (/ˈdʌdli/) is a large town in the West Midlands of England, 6 miles (9.7 km) south-east of Wolverhampton and 10.5 miles (16.9 km) north-west of Birmingham. The town is the administrative centre of the Metropolitan Borough of Dudley and in 2011 had a population of 79,379. The Metropolitan Borough, which includes the towns of Stourbridge and Halesowen, had a population of 312,900. Dudley is sometimes called the capital of the Black Country. Originally a market town, Dudley was one of the birthplaces of the Industrial Revolution and grew into an industrial centre in the 19th century with its iron, coal, and limestone industries before their decline and the relocation of its commercial centre to the nearby Merry Hill Shopping Centre in the 1980s. Tourist attractions include Dudley Zoo, Dudley Castle, the Black Country Living Museum and the historic marketplace.

January 3rd
78644 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Brixton

Population 78536

Brixton is a district of London, located in the borough of Lambeth in south London. The area is identified in the London Plan as one of 35 major centres in Greater London. Brixton is mainly residential with a prominent street market and substantial retail sector. It is a multiethnic community, with a large percentage of its population being of Caribbean descent. It lies within Inner south London and is bordered by Stockwell, Clapham, Streatham, Camberwell, Tulse Hill and Herne Hill. The district houses the main offices of the London Borough of Lambeth. Brixton is 4.3 kilometres (2.7 mi) south-southwest of the geographical centre of London near Lambeth North tube station.

January 2nd
77888 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Bracknell

Population 77256

Bracknell is a town and civil parish in the Borough of Bracknell Forest in Berkshire, England. It lies 11 miles (18 km) to the east of Reading, 9 miles (14 km)south of Maidenhead,10 miles (16 km) southwest of Windsor, 16 miles (26 km) northwest of Guildford and 34 miles (55 km) west of central London. The town has a population of 77,256 and is twinned with the German city of Leverkusen. The town is surrounded, on the east and south, by Swinley Woods and Crowthorne Woods. The urban area has absorbed parts of many local outlying areas including Warfield, Winkfield and Binfield, and is itself, along with Binfield, a component of the Greater London Urban Area as defined by the ONS.

January 1st
77129 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Tamworth, Staffordshire

Population 76900

Tamworth(/ˈtæmwərθ/) is a large market town within an eponymous district in Staffordshire, England, located 14 miles (23 km) northeast of Birmingham city centre and 103 miles (166 km) northwest of London. Bordering northwest Warwickshire to its South and East, and Lichfield District to its North and West, Tamworth takes its name from the River Tame, which flows through it, as does the River Anker. At the 2011 census the town had a population of 76,900. Tamworth is the second largest settlement in Staffordshire after Stoke-on-Trent. Tamworth is the home of the historic Tamworth Castle and Moat House and the town was the ancient capital of the Anglo-Saxon Kingdom of Mercia. The town's main industries include logistics, engineering, clothing, brick, tile and paper manufacture. Until 2001 it was also home to the Reliant car company, which produced the famous three-wheeled Robin model and the Scimitar sports car for several decades. The Snowdome, the UK's first full-sized real-snow indoor ski slope is located in Tamworth, and only a short distance away is Drayton Manor Theme Park.

December 31st
76385 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Weston-super-Mare

Population 76143

Weston-super-Mare /ˈwɛstən ˌsuːpər ˈmɛər/ is a seaside resort in Somerset, England, on the Bristol Channel 18 miles (29 km) south west of Bristol between Worlebury Hill and Bleadon Hill. It includes the suburbs of Oldmixon, West Wick and Worle. Its population at the 2011 census was 76,143. Since 1983, Weston has been twinned with Hildesheim, Germany. Although there is evidence in the local area of occupation since the Iron Age, it was still a small village until the 19th century when it became a seaside resort, and was connected with local towns and cities by a railway, and two piers were built. The growth continued until the second half of the 20th century, when tourism declined and some local industries closed. A regeneration programme is being undertaken with attractions including the Helicopter Museum, Weston-super-Mare Museum, Grand Pier and an aquarium. The Paddle Steamer Waverley and MV Balmoral offer day sea trips from Knightstone Island to various destinations along the Bristol Channel and Severn Estuary. Cultural venues include The Playhouse, the Winter Gardens and Blakehay Theatre. Owing to the large tidal range in the Bristol Channel, the low tide mark in Weston Bay is about 1 mile (1.6 km) from the seafront. Although the beach itself is sandy, low tide uncovers areas of thick mud, hence the colloquial name, Weston-super-Mud. These mudflats are very dangerous to walk in and are crossed by the mouth of the River Axe. Just to the north of the town is Sand Point which marks the lower limit of the Severn Estuary and the start of the Bristol Channel. It is also the site of the Middle Hope biological and geological Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI). In the centre of the town is Ellenborough Park, another SSSI due to the range of plant species found there.

December 30th
75633 dead in the UK from COVID-19

West Bromwich

Population 75405

West Bromwich /wɛst ˈbrɒmɪtʃ/ is a town in Sandwell, West Midlands, England. Historically in Staffordshire, it is in the Black Country, 5 miles (8 km) northwest of Birmingham, and had a population of 75,405 at the 2011 census.

December 29th
74914 dead in the UK from COVID-19

East Kilbride

Population 74411

East Kilbride (Scottish Gaelic: Cille Bhrìghde an Ear) is the largest town in South Lanarkshire in Scotland. It is also designated as Scotland's first new town on 6 May 1947. The area lies on high ground on the south side of the Cathkin Braes, about 8 miles (13 km) southeast of Glasgow and close to the boundary with East Renfrewshire. The town is enclosed by the White Cart River to the west and the Rotten Calder to the east, the latter flowing northwards to join the River Clyde near Cambuslang. This area was previously the site of the small village of East Kilbride, prior to its post-war development.

December 28th
74253 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Ashford, Kent

Population 74204

Ashford is a town in the county of Kent, England. It lies on the River Great Stour at the south edge of the North Downs, about 61 miles (98 km) southeast of central London and 15.3 miles (24.6 km) northwest of Folkestone by road. In the 2011 census, it had a population of 74,204. The name comes from the Old English æscet, indicating a ford near a clump of ash trees. It has been a market town since the 13th century, and a regular market continues to be held. Ashford has been a communications hub and has stood at the centre of five railway lines since the 19th century. The arrival of the railways became a source of employment and contributed to the town's growth. With the opening of the international passenger station it is now a European communications centre, with new lines running between London and the Channel Tunnel (via High Speed 1). The M20 motorway also links Ashford to those two destinations for road traffic. The town has been marked as a place for expansion since the 1960s and appeared on several Government plans for growth. Changes have included the County Square shopping centre, the redevelopment of the Templer Barracks at Repton Park, and the award winning Ashford Designer Outlet. In the 1970s, a controversial ring road scheme and construction of the multi storey Charter House building destroyed significant parts of the old town, though some areas were spared and preserved. St Mary's Church in Ashford has been a local landmark since the 13th century, and expanded in the 15th. Today, the church functions in a dual role as a centre for worship and entertainment. Ashford has two grammar schools; the Norton Knatchbull School and Highworth Grammar School.

December 27th
73578 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Canary Wharf

Population 73390

Canary Wharf is a major business district located in Tower Hamlets, East London. It is one of the United Kingdom's two main financial centres – along with the traditional City of London – and contains many of Europe's tallest buildings, including the second-tallest in the UK, One Canada Square. Canary Wharf contains around 16,000,000 square feet (1,500,000 m2) of office and retail space, of which around 7,900,000 square feet (730,000 m2) is owned by Canary Wharf Group. Around 105,000 people work in Canary Wharf and it is home to the world or European headquarters of numerous major banks, professional services firms and media organisations including Barclays, Citigroup, Clifford Chance, Credit Suisse, EY, Fitch Ratings, HSBC, Infosys, J.P. Morgan, KPMG, MetLife, Moody's, Morgan Stanley, RBC, S&P Global, Skadden, State Street and Thomson Reuters.

December 26th
72929 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Crewe

Population 72863

Crewe /kruː/ is a railway town and civil parish within the borough of Cheshire East and the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England. The area has a population of 72,863. Crewe is perhaps best known as a large railway junction and home to Crewe Works, for many years a major railway engineering facility for manufacturing and overhauling locomotives, but now much reduced in size. From 1946 until 2002 it was also the home of Rolls-Royce motor car production. The Pyms Lane factory on the west of the town now produces Bentley motor cars exclusively. Crewe is 158 miles north of London and 35 miles south of Manchester.

December 25th
72277 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Bromley

Population 71983

Bromley is a large suburban town, the administrative headquarters of the London Borough of Bromley in Greater London, England, United Kingdom. It was historically a market town chartered since 1158 and an ancient parish in the county of Kent. Its location on a coaching route and the opening of a railway station in 1858 were key to its development, and the economic history of Bromley is underpinned by a shift from an agrarian village to commerce and retail. As part of the suburban growth of London in the 20th century, Bromley significantly increased in population and was incorporated as a municipal borough in 1903. It has developed into one of a handful of regionally significant commercial and retail districts outside central London and has formed part of Greater London since 1965. Most of Bromley including the town centre falls under the BR1 postcode district, whereas areas to the west towards Shortlands are part of BR2 instead.

December 24th
71667 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Peckham

Population 71552

Peckham (/ˈpɛkəm/) is a district of south-east London, England, 3.5 miles (5.6 km) south-east of Charing Cross. At the 2001 Census the Peckham ward of the London Borough of Southwark had a population of 11,381. Peckham was originally part of the parish of Camberwell, which later became the Metropolitan Borough of Camberwell, and also included Camberwell, Dulwich, Nunhead, and other London districts.

December 23rd
71086 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Lowestoft

Population 71010

Lowestoft (/ˈloʊ.əstɒft/, /ˈloʊstɒft/ or /ˈloʊstəf/) is a town in the English county of Suffolk. The town is on the North Sea coast and is the most easterly settlement of the United Kingdom. It is 110 miles (177 km) north-east of London, 38 miles (61 km) north-east of Ipswich and 22 miles (35 km) south-east of Norwich. It is situated on the edge of The Broads system and is the major settlement within the district of Waveney with a population of 71,010 in 2011. Some of the earliest evidence of settlement in Britain has been found in Lowestoft and the town has a long history. It is a port town which developed due to the fishing industry, and a traditional seaside resort. It has wide, sandy beaches, two piers and a number of other tourist attractions. Whilst its fisheries have declined, the development of oil and gas exploitation in the southern North Sea in the 1960s led to the development of the town, along with nearby Great Yarmouth, as a base for the industry. This role has since declined and the town has begun to develop as a centre of the renewable energy industry within the East of England.

December 22nd
70518 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Keighley

Population 70000

(For the constituency of the same name, see Keighley (UK Parliament constituency). For the community in the United States, see Keighley, Kansas.) Keighley (/ˈkiːθli/ KEETH-lee) is a town and civil parish within the metropolitan borough of the City of Bradford in West Yorkshire, England. Historically in the West Riding of Yorkshire, it is situated 11 miles (18 km) northwest of Bradford and is at the confluence of the rivers Aire and Worth. The town area, which is part of the Brontë Country, has a population of 51,429, making it the third largest civil parish in England. Keighley lies in a fold between the countryside of Airedale and Keighley Moors. The town is the terminus of the Keighley and Worth Valley Railway, a heritage steam branch line which has been restored and runs through the Worth Valley to Oxenhope via Oakworth and Haworth. As of the 2011 census, Keighley had a population of 56,348.

December 21st
69953 dead in the UK from COVID-19
December 20th
69380 dead in the UK from COVID-19
December 19th
68876 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Erith

Population 68662

Erith (/ˈɪərᵻθ/) is a district of the London Borough of Bexley in south-east London, England, next to the River Thames, north-east of Bexleyheath and north-west of Dartford. Erith town centre has undergone modernisation and an increase in dwellings since 1961. The curved riverside high street contains three listed buildings, including the Church of England church and the Carnegie Building, while the district otherwise consists primarily of suburban homes. Erith is linked to central London and Kent by rail and a dual carriageway. It has the longest pier in London, and retains a coastal environment with salt marshes as well as industrial land.

December 18th
68388 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Wimbledon, London

Population 68187

(For other uses, see Wimbledon (disambiguation).) Wimbledon /ˈwɪmbəldən/ is a district of southwest London, England, in the London Borough of Merton, south of Wandsworth, northeast of New Malden, northwest of Mitcham, west of Streatham and north of Sutton. Wimbledon had a population of 68,187 in 2011 which includes the electoral wards of Abbey, Dundonald, Hillside, Trinity, Village, Raynes Park and Wimbledon Park. It is home to the Wimbledon Tennis Championships and New Wimbledon Theatre, and contains Wimbledon Common, one of the largest areas of common land in London. The residential and retail area is split into two sections known as the "village" and the "town", with the High Street being the rebuilding of the original medieval village, and the "town" having first developed gradually after the building of the railway station in 1838. Wimbledon has been inhabited since at least the Iron Age when the hill fort on Wimbledon Common is thought to have been constructed. In 1087 when the Domesday Book was compiled, Wimbledon was part of the manor of Mortlake. The ownership of the manor of Wimbledon changed between various wealthy families many times during its history, and the area also attracted other wealthy families who built large houses such as Eagle House, Wimbledon Manor House and Warren House. The village developed with a stable rural population coexisting alongside nobility and wealthy merchants from the city. In the 18th century the Dog and Fox public house became a stop on the stagecoach run from London to Portsmouth, then in 1838 the London and South Western Railway (L&SWR) opened a station to the south east of the village at the bottom of Wimbledon hill. The location of the station shifted the focus of the town's subsequent growth away from the original village centre. Wimbledon had its own borough larger than its historic boundaries while still in the county of Surrey; it was absorbed into the London Borough of Merton as part of the creation of Greater London in 1965. Since 2005, the north and west of the Borough has been represented in Westminster by Stephen Hammond, a Conservative MP. The eastern and southern of the Borough are represented by Siobhain McDonagh, a Labour MP. It has established minority groups; among the most prominent are British Asians (including British Sri Lankans), British Ghanaians, Polish and Irish people.

December 17th
67875 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Kettering

Population 67635

Kettering is a town in Northamptonshire, England, about 81 miles (130 km) north of London. Kettering is mainly situated on the west side of the River Ise, a tributary of the River Nene which meets at Wellingborough. Originally named Cytringan, Kyteringas and Keteiringan in the 10th century, the name Kettering is now taken to mean 'the place (or territory) of Ketter's people (or kinsfolk)'. At the 2001 census, the borough had a population of 81,844 whilst the town proper had a population of 51,063. The town is twinned with Lahnstein, in Germany and Kettering, Ohio, in the United States. Being part of the Milton Keynes South Midlands (MKSM) study area along with other towns in Northamptonshire, the town is due to get around 6,000 additional homes mainly to the east of the town. The town, like other towns in the area, has a growing commuter population as it is located on the Midland Main Line railway, which has fast InterCity trains directly into London St Pancras International taking around 1 hour. This gives an interchange Eurostar services to Continental Europe.

December 16th
67339 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Washington, Tyne and Wear

Population 67085

Washington is a town in the City of Sunderland local government district of Tyne and Wear, England, and part of historic County Durham. Washington is located geographically at an equal distance from the centres of Newcastle, Durham and Sunderland, hence it has close ties to all three cities. Washington was designated a new town in 1964; it expanded dramatically, by the creation of new villages and the absorption of areas of Chester-le-Street, to house overspill population from surrounding cities. At the 2011 census, Washington had a population of 67,085, compared to 53,388 in 2001.

December 15th
66906 dead in the UK from COVID-19
December 14th
66448 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Hounslow

Population 66292

Hounslow (/ˈhaʊnzloʊ/) is the principal town in the London Borough of Hounslow in Greater London. It is a suburban district 10.6 miles (17 km) west south-west of Charing Cross. It forms a larger post town in the TW postcode area and is an economic hub within the capital; it has a large shopping centre which adjoins its high street and a large number of restaurants, cafés and small businesses, many of which are associated with product assembly, marketing, telecommunications and London Heathrow Airport. A minority of its workers are employed in Central London, to which the town is connected by rail and tube. Hounslow is part of the TW3 postcode area, though some areas to the west are in TW4 instead. The population of the town, comprising the Hounslow Central, Hounslow Heath and Hounslow South wards, was 41,304 in the 2011 census.

December 13th
65969 dead in the UK from COVID-19
December 12th
65553 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Torquay

Population 65245

Torquay /tɔːrˈkiː/ is a seaside town in Devon, England, part of the unitary authority area of Torbay. It lies 18 miles (29 km) south of the county town of Exeter and 28 miles (45 km) east-north-east of Plymouth, on the north of Tor Bay, adjoining the neighbouring town of Paignton on the west of the bay and across from the fishing port of Brixham. In the 2011 UK Census, Torquay's population was 65,245, about half of that of the whole of Torbay. The town's economy, like Brixham's, was initially based upon fishing and agriculture, but in the early 19th century the town began to develop into a fashionable seaside resort, initially frequented by members of the Royal Navy during the Napoleonic Wars while the Royal Navy anchored in the bay. Later, as the town's fame spread, it was popular with the crème de la crème of Victorian society. Renowned for its healthful climate, the town earned the nickname of the English Riviera. Torquay was the home of the writer Agatha Christie, who was born in the town and lived there during her early years. The town contains an "Agatha Christie Mile", a tour with plaques dedicated to her life and work.

December 11th
65116 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Kensington

Population 64681

Kensington is a district within the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in West London. The north east is taken up by Kensington Gardens, once private, as the name suggests, but today a public park with Italian and Dutch gardens, public buildings such as the Albert Memorial, the Serpentine Gallery and Speke's monument. Its commercial heart is Kensington High Street. The affluent and densely populated area contains the major museum district of South Kensington, which has the Royal Albert Hall for music and nearby Royal College of Music. The area is home to many of London's European embassies. Cementing Kensington's indicators of connections with France, the area has the Lycée Français Charles de Gaulle, French Consulate, French Embassy Cultural Department and the London Oratory on the borders with diminutive Knightsbridge.

December 10th
64664 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Taunton

Population 64621

Taunton /ˈtɔːntən/ is the county town of Somerset, England. The built up area of the town had a population of 64,621 in 2011. The town has over 1,000 years of religious and military history, including a monastery dating back to the 10th century and Taunton Castle, which has origins in the Anglo Saxon period and was later the site of a priory. The Normans then built a stone structured castle, which belonged to the Bishops of Winchester. The current heavily reconstructed buildings are the inner ward, which now houses the Museum of Somerset and the Somerset Military Museum. The town is undergoing a regeneration project with redevelopment of the town centre. It has various transport links which support its central role in economy and commerce. These have included the Grand Western Canal which reached Taunton in 1839 and arrival of the railway in 1842. Taunton is the site of Musgrove Park Hospital and Somerset County Cricket Club's County Ground and is home to 40 Commando, Royal Marines. Central Taunton is part of the annual West Country Carnival circuit. It hosts the Taunton flower show, which has been held in Vivary Park since 1866. The United Kingdom Hydrographic Office is located on Admiralty Way.

December 9th
64216 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Andover, Hampshire

Population 64000

Andover /ˈændoʊvər/ is a town in the English county of Hampshire. The town is on the River Anton some 18 miles (29 km) west of the town of Basingstoke, 18 miles (29 km) north-west of the city of Winchester and 25 miles (40 km) north of the city of Southampton. Andover is twinned with the towns of Redon in France, Goch in Germany, and Andover, Massachusetts in the United States.

December 8th
63785 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Hornchurch

Population 63583

Hornchurch is a suburban town in the London Borough of Havering, East London, England, 15.2 miles (24.5 km) east-northeast of Charing Cross. Historically an ancient parish in the county of Essex, that became the manor and liberty of Havering, Hornchurch shifted from agriculture to other industries with the growing significance of nearby Romford as a market town and centre of administration. As part of the suburban growth of London in the 20th century, Hornchurch significantly expanded and increased in population, becoming an urban district in 1926, and forming part of Greater London since 1965. It is the location of Queen's Theatre, Havering Sixth Form College and Havering College of Further and Higher Education.

December 7th
63349 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Stourbridge

Population 63298

Stourbridge /ˈstaʊərbrɪdʒ/ is a large town in the Metropolitan Borough of Dudley, in the West Midlands of England. Historically a part of Worcestershire, Stourbridge was a centre of glass making, and today includes the suburbs of Amblecote, Lye, Norton, Oldswinford, Pedmore, Wollaston, Wollescote and Wordsley. The population, as recorded in the United Kingdom Census 2001, was 55,480, increasing to 63,298 at the 2011 Census. Stourbridge is included in the Stourbridge parliamentary constituency, currently held by Margot James of the Conservative Party.

December 6th
62928 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Woking

Population 62796

Woking (/ˈwoʊkɪŋ/) is a large town and civil parish that shares its name with the surrounding local government district, located in the west of Surrey, England. It is at the southwestern edge of the Greater London Urban Area and is a part of the London commuter belt, with frequent trains and a journey time of approximately 24 minutes to Waterloo station. Woking is 23 miles (37 km) southwest of Charing Cross in central London. Woking town itself, excluding the surrounding district, has a population of 62,796, with the whole local government district (the borough of Woking) having a population of 99,500 (mid-2011 estimate). Woking has been a Conservative area since the constituency was created in 1950, with Jonathan Lord elected as its Member of Parliament in the 2010 General Election.

December 5th
62512 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Sittingbourne

Population 62500

Sittingbourne is an industrial town situated in the Swale district of Kent in south east England, 17 miles (27 km) from Canterbury and 45 miles (72 km) from London. The town sits beside the Roman Watling Street, an ancient British trackway used by the Romans and the Anglo-Saxons and next to the Swale, a strip of sea separating mainland Kent from the Isle of Sheppey. The town became prominent after the death of Thomas Becket in 1170, since it provided a convenient resting point on the road from London to Canterbury and Dover. Sittingbourne is growing rapidly due to a number of large residential developments, and its railway line links to London Victoria and HS1 to St Pancras International, the journey taking about an hour from Sittingbourne railway station.

December 4th
62117 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Newtownabbey

Population 62056

Newtownabbey is a major urban area on the outskirts of north Belfast it is separated from the city by the M2 motorway. At the 2001 Census, Newtownabbey Urban Area had a population of 62,056, making it the fourth largest settlement in Northern Ireland. It is part of Antrim and Newtownabbey Borough Council. Largely a residential area, the borough is also home to many engineering and computer industries. Retail and leisure facilities include the Abbey Centre, the Valley Leisure Centre, the Ballyearl Arts & Leisure Centre,The Theatre at the Mill, Glengormley Moviehouse, Glengormley Sportsbowl and three large public parks. The main campus for the University of Ulster is based in the Jordanstown area of Newtownabbey. Although the Jordanstown campus of the University of Ulster is due to merge with the current Belfast campus which is due to be completed by 2018.

December 3rd
61644 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Wrexham

Population 61603

Wrexham (/ˈrɛksəm/ REKS-əm; Welsh: Wrecsam; Welsh pronunciation: [ˈwrɛksam]) is a town in north Wales, between the Welsh mountains and the lower Dee Valley alongside the border with England. In Wrexham County Borough, it is the largest town in north Wales and an administrative, commercial, retail and educational centre. At the 2011 Census, Wrexham had a population of 61,603, the fourth largest urban area in Wales.

December 2nd
61170 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Runcorn

Population 61000

Runcorn is an industrial town and cargo port in Cheshire, England, located within the Borough of Halton. In 2010, Runcorn's population was recorded to be 61,000. In May 2014, it became a member of the Liverpool City Region Combined Authority. The town is on the southern bank of the River Mersey, where the estuary narrows to form the Runcorn Gap. Directly to the north across the River Mersey is the town of Widnes. Upstream and 8 miles (12.9 km) to the northeast is the town of Warrington, and downstream 16 miles (26 km) to the west is the city of Liverpool. Runcorn railway station is on a branch of the West Coast Main Line and provides frequent services to the Liverpool Lime Street, Birmingham New Street, and London Euston stations. The A533 road passes through the town from the south, crossing the Runcorn Gap over the Silver Jubilee Bridge, the lowest bridge crossing of the River Mersey. The Manchester Ship Canal runs alongside the Runcorn bank of the River Mersey; the Bridgewater Canal terminates in the canal basin in the town centre, as the staircase of locks leading down to the ship canal was filled in many decades ago. Runcorn was a small, isolated village until the Industrial Revolution. It was a health resort in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Towards the end of the 18th century, a port began to develop on the south bank of the River Mersey. During the 19th century, industries developed the manufacture of soap and alkali, quarrying, shipbuilding, engineering, and tanning. In the early 20th century, the prime industries were chemicals and tanning. The original village has grown to include what were outlying villages. Except for chemicals, all of the old industries have disappeared and there has been diversification, in particular because of the close links to the motorway system and the development of warehousing and distribution centres. A new town was built to the east of the existing town in the 1960s and 1970s, and areas of private housing have been established farther to the east; this has resulted in the population more than doubling from around 26,000 to its present level of 70,000.

December 1st
60785 dead in the UK from COVID-19
November 30th
60384 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Wallasey

Population 60284

Wallasey (/ˈwɒləsi/) is a town within the Metropolitan Borough of Wirral, in Merseyside, England, on the mouth of the River Mersey, at the northeastern corner of the Wirral Peninsula. According to the 2001 Census, the town had a total resident population of 58,710. At the 2011 Census the population of the Wallasey ward, which covers a much smaller area, was counted as being 14,996.

November 29th
59961 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Rhondda

Population 59602

Rhondda /ˈrɒnðə/, or the Rhondda Valley (Welsh: Cwm Rhondda [kʊm ˈr̥ɔnða]), is a former coal mining valley in Wales, formerly a local government district, consisting of 16 communities built around the River Rhondda. The area is, in fact, made up of two valleys: those of the larger Rhondda Fawr valley (mawr large) and the smaller Rhondda Fach valley (bach small). The singular term 'Rhondda Valley' and the plural 'Rhondda Valleys' are both commonly used. In 2001 the Rhondda constituency of the National Assembly for Wales had a population of 72,443; while the National Office of Statistics described the Rhondda urban area as having a population of 59,602. Rhondda is part of Rhondda Cynon Taf County Borough and is part of the South Wales Valleys. The Rhondda Valley is most notable for its historical link to the coal mining industry which was at its peak between 1840-1925. The Rhondda Valleys were home to a strong early Nonconformist Christian movement which manifested itself in the Baptist chapels which moulded Rhondda values in the 19th and early 20th century. Rhondda is also famous for strong masculine cultural ties within a social community which expressed itself outside industry in the form of male voice choirs, sport and politics.

November 28th
59498 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Loughborough

Population 59317

Loughborough (/ˈlʌfbərə/ LUFF-bərə or /ˈlʌfbrə/ LUFF-brə) is a town within the Charnwood borough of Leicestershire, England. It is the seat of Charnwood Borough Council and home to Loughborough University. The town had a population of 57,600 in 2004, making it the largest settlement in Leicestershire outside the city of Leicester. The town is close to the Nottinghamshire border and is within a short distance of locations such as Nottingham, the East Midlands Airport and Derby. The town has the world's largest bell foundry — John Taylor Bellfounders, which made the bells for the Carillon war memorial, a landmark within the Queens Park in the town, Great Paul for St Paul's Cathedral, and York Minster. The first mention of Loughborough is in the 1086 Domesday Book. Loughborough's local weekly newspaper is the Loughborough Echo. The town is also served by Leicestershire's daily newspaper, the Leicester Mercury.

November 27th
59031 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Hereford

Population 58896

Hereford (/ˈhɛrᵻfərd/) is a cathedral city, civil parish and county town of Herefordshire, England. It lies on the River Wye, approximately 16 miles (26 km) east of the border with Wales, 24 miles (39 km) southwest of Worcester, and 23 miles (37 km) northwest of Gloucester. With a population of 58,896, it is the largest settlement in the county. The name "Hereford" is said to come from the Anglo-Saxon "here", an army or formation of soldiers, and the "ford", a place for crossing a river. If this is the origin it suggests that Hereford was a place where a body of armed men forded or crossed the Wye. The Welsh name for Hereford is Henffordd, meaning "old road", and probably refers to the Roman road and Roman settlement at nearby Stretton Sugwas. An early town charter from 1189 granted by Richard I of England describes it as "Hereford in Wales". Hereford has been recognised as a city since time immemorial, with the status being reconfirmed as recently as October 2000. It is now known chiefly as a trading centre for a wider agricultural and rural area. Products from Hereford include: cider, beer, leather goods, nickel alloys, poultry, chemicals, and cattle, including the famous Hereford breed.

November 26th
58608 dead in the UK from COVID-19
November 25th
58175 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Streatham

Population 58055

Streatham (/ˈstrɛt.əm/ stret-um) is a district in south London, England, mostly in the London Borough of Lambeth. It is centred 5 miles (8.0 km) south of Charing Cross. The area is identified in the London Plan as one of 35 major centres in Greater London.

November 24th
57693 dead in the UK from COVID-19
November 23rd
57234 dead in the UK from COVID-19
November 22nd
56768 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Barrow-in-Furness

Population 56745

Barrow-in-Furness (/ˈbæroʊ ɪn ˈfɜːrnəs/ BA-roh in FUR-nəs; commonly known as Barrow) is a town and borough in Cumbria, North West England. Historically part of Lancashire, it was incorporated as a municipal borough in 1867 and merged with adjacent districts in 1974 to form the Borough of Barrow-in-Furness. At the tip of the Furness peninsula, close to the Lake District, it is bordered by Morecambe Bay, the Duddon Estuary and the Irish Sea. In 2011, Barrow's population was 57,000, the second largest urban area in Cumbria after Carlisle. Natives of Barrow, as well as the local dialect, are known as Barrovian. In the Middle Ages, Barrow was a small hamlet with Furness Abbey, on the outskirts of the modern-day town, controlling the local economy before its dissolution in 1537. The iron prospector Henry Schneider arrived in Furness in 1839 and, with other investors, opened the Furness Railway in 1846 to transport iron ore and slate from local mines to the coast. Further hematite deposits were discovered, of sufficient size to develop factories for smelting and exporting steel. By the late 19th century, the Barrow Hematite Steel Company-owned steelworks was the world's largest. Barrow's location and the availability of steel allowed the town to develop into a significant producer of naval vessels, a shift that was accelerated during World War I and the local yard's specialisation in submarines. The original iron- and steel-making enterprises closed down after World War II, leaving Vickers shipyard as Barrow's main industry and employer. Several Royal Navy flagships, the vast majority of its nuclear submarines as well as numerous ocean liners and oil tankers were manufactured at the facility. The end of the Cold War and subsequent decrease in military spending saw high unemployment in the town through lack of contracts; despite this, the BAE Systems shipyard remains operational as the UK's largest by workforce and is undergoing a major expansion associated with the Successor-class submarine programme. Today Barrow is a hub for energy generation and handling. Offshore wind farms form one of the highest concentrations of turbines in the world.

November 21st
56293 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Livingston, West Lothian

Population 56269

Livingston (Scots: Leivinstoun, Scottish Gaelic: Baile Dhùn Lèibhe), is the largest town in West Lothian, Scotland. It is the fourth post-World War II new town to be built in Scotland, designated in 1962. It is about 15 miles (25 km) west of Edinburgh and 30 miles (50 km) east of Glasgow, and is bordered by the towns of Broxburn to the northeast and Bathgate to the northwest. It was built around a collection of small villages, Livingston Village, Bellsquarry and Livingston Station (now part of Deans). It has a number of residential precincts or areas. These include Craigshill, Howden, Ladywell, Knightsridge, Deans, Dedridge, Murieston, Almondvale, Eliburn, Kirkton and Adambrae. To the north of Craigshill lies the Houstoun Industrial Estate. The core locality of Livingston is defined by the General Register Office for Scotland (GRO) as including Uphall Station and Pumpherston. The wider urban settlement area also includes Mid Calder and East Calder. Other neighbouring villages include Kirknewton, Polbeth and West Calder. In 2001 the town had population of 50,826 according to the census. The 2011 census showed the population of Livingston had increased to 56,269. Livingston is the second biggest settlement in the Lothians after Edinburgh. Until 1963 the area surrounding the ancient village of Livingston was open farm land and the ancient village is now called Livingston Village.

November 20th
55827 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Ellesmere Port

Population 55715

Ellesmere Port /ˈɛlzmɪərpɔːrt/ is a large town and port in Cheshire, England, south of the Wirral on the banks of the Manchester Ship Canal. The town had a population of 55,715 in 2011. As well as a service sector economy, the town has retained large industries including Stanlow oil refinery, a chemical works and the Vauxhall Motors car factory. There are also a number of tourist attractions: the National Waterways Museum, the Blue Planet Aquarium and Cheshire Oaks Designer Outlet.

November 19th
55375 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Canterbury

Population 55240

Canterbury (/ˈkæntərbri/, /-bəri/, or /-bɛri/) is a historic English cathedral city and UNESCO World Heritage Site, which lies at the heart of the City of Canterbury, a local government district of Kent, England. It lies on the River Stour. The Archbishop of Canterbury is the primate of the Church of England and the worldwide Anglican Communion owing to the importance of St Augustine, who served as the apostle to the pagan Kingdom of Kent around the turn of the 7th century. The city's cathedral became a major focus of pilgrimage following the 1170 martyrdom of Thomas Becket. A journey of pilgrims to his shrine served as the frame for Geoffrey Chaucer's 14th century classic The Canterbury Tales. Canterbury is a popular tourist destination: consistently one of the most-visited cities in the United Kingdom, the city's economy is heavily reliant upon tourism. The city has been occupied since Paleolithic times and served as the capital of the Celtic Cantiaci and Jute Kingdom of Kent. Many historical structures fill the area, including a city wall founded in Roman times and rebuilt in the 14th century, the ruins of St Augustine's Abbey and a Norman castle, and the oldest extant school in the world, the King's School. Modern additions include the Marlowe Theatre and the St Lawrence Ground, home of the Kent County Cricket Club. There is also a substantial student population, brought about by the presence of the University of Kent, Canterbury Christ Church University, the University for the Creative Arts, and the Girne American University Canterbury campus. Canterbury remains, however, a relatively small city in terms of geographical size, when compared with other British cities.

November 18th
54913 dead in the UK from COVID-19
November 17th
54427 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Christchurch, Dorset

Population 54210

Christchurch /ˈkraɪst.tʃɜːrtʃ/ is a borough and town on the south coast of England. The town adjoins Bournemouth in the west and the New Forest lies to the east. Historically in the county of Hampshire, it became part of the administrative county of Dorset in the 1974 reorganisation of local government. Covering an area of 19.5 square miles (51 km2), Christchurch had a 2011 population of 54,210, making it the fourth most populous town in Dorset, closely behind Weymouth which has a population of 54,539. Founded in the 7th century at the confluence of the rivers Avon and Stour which flow into Christchurch Harbour, the town was originally named Twynham but became known as Christchurch following the construction of the priory in 1094. The town developed into an important trading port and was fortified in the 9th century. Further defences were added in the 12th century with the construction of a castle which was destroyed by the Parliamentarian Army during the English Civil War. During the 18th and 19th centuries smuggling flourished in Christchurch and became one of the town's most lucrative industries. The town was heavily fortified during Second World War as a precaution against an expected invasion and in 1940 an Airspeed factory was established on the town's airfield which manufactured aircraft for the Royal Air Force. The town's harbour, beaches, nature reserves and historically important buildings have made Christchurch a popular tourist destination attracting some 1.5 million visitors a year. Bournemouth Airport, an international airport which handles approximately 800,000 passengers a year, is located within the borough boundary at Hurn. The airport's industrial park contains a number of aerospace and engineering businesses and is one of the largest employment sites in Dorset. Christchurch is a popular destination for retirees and has one of the oldest populations in the country with 30 per cent of residents aged over 65.

November 16th
53987 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Deeside

Population 53568

Deeside (Welsh: Glannau Dyfrdwy) is the name given to a predominantly industrial conurbation of towns and villages in Flintshire close to the Wales–England border lying near the canalised stretch of the River Dee that flows from neighbouring Chester into the Dee Estuary. These include Connah's Quay, Shotton, Queensferry, Aston, Garden City, Sealand, Broughton, Bretton, Hawarden, Ewloe, Mancot, Pentre, Saltney and Sandycroft. The population is around 50,000, with a plurality (17,500) living in Connah's Quay. Although locally the term Deeside is usually only used to refer to Connah's Quay, Shotton, Queensferry, Garden city and the Deeside industrial estate. Deeside is known for its industry, providing jobs for the people of Cheshire, Merseyside & North Wales. The biggest employment area in Deeside is Deeside Industrial Park, located on the north bank of the Dee on the southern edge of the Wirral peninsula, which has both historical and contemporary significance, and provides Deeside and the surrounding area with jobs in many different industries from construction to food production. Deeside is also home to steel manufacturer Tata Steel, aircraft manufacturer Airbus and Toyota's highly advanced engine manufacturing plant.

November 15th
53563 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Braintree, Essex

Population 53477

(For other uses, see Braintree.) Braintree is a town in Essex, England. The principal settlement of Braintree District, it is located 10 miles (16 km) northeast of Chelmsford and 15 miles (24 km) west of Colchester. According to the 2011 Census, the town had a population of 41,634, while the urban area, which includes Great Notley, Rayne and High Garrett, had a population of 53,477. Braintree has grown contiguous with several surrounding settlements. Braintree proper lies on the River Brain and to the south of Stane Street, the Roman road from Braughing to Colchester, while Bocking lies on the River Blackwater and to the north of the road. The two are sometimes referred to together as Braintree and Bocking, and since 1934 they form the civil parish of that name. Braintree is bypassed by the modern-day A120 and A131 roads, while trains serve two stations in the town, at the end of the Braintree Branch Line. Braintree is twinned with Pierrefitte-sur-Seine, France, and gives its name to the town of Braintree, Massachusetts, in the United States.

November 14th
53109 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Leigh, Greater Manchester

Population 52855

Leigh is a town in the Metropolitan Borough of Wigan, Greater Manchester, England, 7.7 miles (12 km) southeast of Wigan and 9.5 miles (15.3 km) west of Manchester city centre. Leigh is situated on low-lying land to the north west of Chat Moss. Historically a part of Lancashire, Leigh was originally the centre of a large ecclesiastical parish covering six vills or townships. When the three townships of Pennington, Westleigh and Bedford merged in 1875 forming the Leigh Local Board District, Leigh became the official name for the town although it had been applied to the area of Pennington and Westleigh around the parish church for many centuries.The town became an urban district in 1894 when part of Atherton was added. In 1899 Leigh became a municipal borough. The first town hall was built in King Street and replaced by the present building in 1907. Originally an agricultural area noted for dairy farming, domestic spinning and weaving led to a considerable silk and, in the 20th century, cotton industry. Leigh also exploited the underlying coal measures particularly after the town was connected to the canals and railways. Leigh had an important engineering base. The legacy of Leigh's industrial past can be seen in the remaining red brick mills – some of which are listed buildings – although it is now a mainly residential town, with Edwardian and Victorian terraced housing packed around the town centre. Leigh's present-day economy is based largely on the retail sector.

November 13th
52679 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Altrincham

Population 52419

(For other uses, see Altrincham (disambiguation).) Altrincham (/ˈɒltrɪŋəm/ OL-tring-əm) is a market town in Trafford, Greater Manchester, England, south of the River Mersey about 8 miles (13 km) southwest of Manchester city centre, 3 miles (5 km) south-southwest of Sale and 10 miles (16 km) east of Warrington. At the 2001 UK census, it had a population of 41,000 increasing to 52,419 at the 2011 census. Historically part of Cheshire, Altrincham was established as a market town in 1290, a time when the economy of most communities was based on agriculture rather than trade, and there is still a market in the town today. Further socioeconomic development came with the extension of the Bridgewater Canal to Altrincham in 1765 and the arrival of the railway in 1849, stimulating industrial activity in the town. Outlying villages were absorbed by Altrincham's subsequent growth, along with the grounds of Dunham Massey Hall, formerly the home of the Earl of Stamford, and now a tourist attraction with three Grade I Listed Buildings and a deer park. Altrincham today is an affluent commuter town, partly because of its transport links. The town has a strong middle class presence; there has been a steady increase in Altrincham's middle classes since the 19th century. It is also home to Altrincham F.C. and three ice hockey clubs, Manchester Storm, Altrincham Aces and Trafford Tornados. Altrincham's population increased to 45,809 in 2011.

November 12th
52244 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Lancaster, Lancashire

Population 52234

Lancaster /ˈlæŋkəstər/, or /ˈlæŋˌkæstər/ is a city and the county town of Lancashire, England, England. It is situated on the River Lune and has a population of 45,952. Lancaster is a constituent settlement of the wider City of Lancaster, a local government district which has a population of 138,375 and encompasses several outlying settlements, including neighbouring Morecambe. Long existing as a commercial, cultural and educational centre, Lancaster is the settlement that gives Lancashire its name. Lancaster has several unique ties to the British monarchy; the House of Lancaster was a branch of the English royal family, whilst the Duchy of Lancaster holds large estates on behalf of Elizabeth II, who herself is also the Duke of Lancaster in her capacity as monarch. Lancaster was granted city statusin 1937 for its "long association with the crown" and because it was "the county town of the King's Duchy of Lancaster". With its history based on its port and canal, Lancaster is an ancient settlement, dominated by Lancaster Castle, Lancaster Priory Church and the Ashton Memorial. It is also home to the campus-based Lancaster University and a campus of the University of Cumbria.

November 11th
51823 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Crosby, Merseyside

Population 51789

Crosby is a town in the Metropolitan Borough of Sefton, in Merseyside, England. Historically in Lancashire, it is situated north of Bootle, south of Southport and Formby and west of Netherton.

November 10th
51433 dead in the UK from COVID-19
November 9th
51044 dead in the UK from COVID-19
November 8th
50564 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Clacton-on-Sea

Population 50548

Clacton-on-Sea is the largest town in the Tendring peninsula and district in Essex, England, and was founded as an urban district in 1871. It is a seaside resort that saw a peak of tourists in the summer months between the 1950s and 1970s. The town's economy continues to rely significantly on entertainment and day-trip facilities and it is strong in the service sector, with a large retired population. The north-west part of the town has two business/industrial parks. In the wider district, agriculture and occupations connected to the Port of Harwich provide further employment.

November 7th
50150 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Durham, England

Population 50000

Durham (/ˈdʌrəm/, locally /ˈdɜːrəm/) is a historic city and the county town of County Durham in North East England. The city lies on the River Wear, to the west of Sunderland, south of Newcastle upon Tyne and to the north of Darlington. Founded over the final resting place of St Cuthbert, its Norman cathedral became a centre of pilgrimage in medieval England. The cathedral and adjacent 11th-century castle were designated a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1986. The castle has been the home of Durham University since 1832. HM Prison Durham is also located close to the city centre.

November 6th
49759 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Accrington

Population 49600

Accrington is a town in the Hyndburn borough of Lancashire, England. It lies about 4 miles (6 km) east of Blackburn, 6 miles (10 km) west of Burnley, 13 miles (21 km) east of Preston, 20 miles (32 km) north of Manchester city centre and is situated on the mostly culverted River Hyndburn. Commonly abbreviated by locals to "Accy", the town has a population of 45,600 according to the 2001 census and the urban area has a population of over 80,000. Accrington is a former centre of the cotton and textile machinery industries. The town is famed for manufacturing the hardest and densest building bricks in the world, "The Accrington NORI" (iron), which were used in the construction of the Empire State Building and for the foundations of Blackpool Tower; famous for Accrington Stanley F.C. and the Haworth Art Gallery which holds Europe's largest collection of Tiffany glass.

November 5th
49359 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Wellingborough

Population 49087

Wellingborough is a market town and borough in Northamptonshire, England, situated 11 miles (18 km) from the county town of Northampton. The town is situated on the north side of the River Nene, most of the older town is sited on the flanks of the hills above the river's current flood plain. Due to frequent flooding by the River Nene, the town was mostly built above the current level of the flood plain. Originally named "Wendelingburgh", the settlement was established in the Saxon period and is mentioned in the Domesday Book under the name of "Wendelburie". The town was granted a royal market charter in 1201, by King John of England. As of 2011 the census states the borough has a population of 75,400, which the town itself accounts for 49,087. The town of Wellingborough is governed by The Borough Council of Wellingborough, with their office located in the town centre. The town is twinned with Niort in France, and with Wittlich in Germany. The town is predicted to grow by around 30 percent under the Milton Keynes South Midlands (MKSM) study, as the British government has identified Wellingborough as one of several towns in Northamptonshire where growth will be directed over the next 30 years. The study allocates 12,800 additional homes mainly to the east of the town. The town has also a growing commuter population as it is located on the Midland Main Line railway, operated by East Midlands Trains, which has InterCity trains to London St Pancras International station taking under an hour, giving an interchange with Eurostar services.

November 4th
48979 dead in the UK from COVID-19
November 3rd
48651 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Shoreham-by-Sea

Population 48487

Shoreham-by-Sea (often shortened to Shoreham) is a seaside town and port in West Sussex, England. The town has a population of 48,487 according to the 2011 census, and is historically part of Sussex. The town is bordered to its north by the South Downs, to its west by the Adur Valley and to its south by the River Adur and Shoreham Beach on the English Channel. The town lies in the middle of the ribbon of urban development along the English south coast between the city of Brighton and Hove and the town of Worthing. Shoreham civil parish covers an area of 984.88 hectares (2,433.7 acres) and has a population of 19,175 (2001 census).

November 2nd
48290 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Morden

Population 48233

Morden is a district in the London Borough of Merton. It is located approximately 8 miles (13 km) South-southwest of central London between Merton Park and Wimbledon (to the north), Mitcham (to the east), Sutton (to the south) and Worcester Park (to the west). Morden had a population of 48,233 in 2011 (which refers to the populations of the wards of Cannon Hill, Lower Morden, Merton Park, Ravensbury and St Helier).

November 1st
47957 dead in the UK from COVID-19
October 31st
47599 dead in the UK from COVID-19
October 30th
47279 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Ayr

Population 47190

Ayr (/ɛər/; Scottish Gaelic: Inbhir Àir, "Mouth of the River Ayr") is a large town and former Royal Burgh situated on the west coast of Ayrshire in Scotland, United Kingdom. It is the administrative centre of the South Ayrshire council area and historical county town of Ayrshire. Ayr is currently the most populated settlement in Ayrshire and is the 12th most populous settlement in Scotland. The town was established as a Royal Burgh in 1205, serving as Ayrshire's central marketplace and harbour throughout the Medieval Period and remaining a well-renowned port across the Early Modern Period. On the southern bank of the River Ayr sits the ramparts of a Citadel constructed by Oliver Cromwell during the mid-17th Century. Towards the south of the town is the birthplace of Scottish poet Robert Burns in the suburb of Alloway. With the expansion of the railway during the 19th Century Ayr soon developed into a seaside resort. This remains the case today with tourism occupying a significant sect of the local economy in Ayr through the opening of a Butlin's holiday park on the southern headlands of the town and through the continued presence of the Gaiety Theatre, which ran various shows across the late 20th century, attracting performers from across the United Kingdom. Politically, Ayr is considerably more Conservative-voting than the remainder of Scotland, being represented by a Conservative MP continuously for a period of 91 years – from 1906 (as part of the Ayr Burghs constituency) until 1997. The town forms part of the first Conservative constituency seat in the Scottish Parliament which has been represented by Conservative MSP John Scott since a by-election in 2000. The town is now marginally contested between the Conservatives and the Scottish National Party. Ayr is one of the largest retail centres along the south of Scotland and was recognised as the second healthiest town centre in the United Kingdom by the Royal Society for Public Health in 2014. Ayr has hosted the Scottish Grand National horse-racing steeplechase annually since 1965. The town also accommodates the headquarters of the Ayr Advertiser and Ayrshire Post newspapers and the West FM radio station.

October 29th
46941 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Inverness

Population 46870

Inverness (/ɪnvərˈnɛs/; from the Scottish Gaelic: Inbhir Nis [iɲɪɾʲˈniʃ], meaning "Mouth of the River Ness") is a city in the Scottish Highlands. It is the administrative centre for the Highland council area, and is regarded as the capital of the Highlands of Scotland. Inverness lies near two important battle sites: the 11th-century battle of Blàr nam Fèinne against Norway which took place on The Aird and the 18th-century Battle of Culloden which took place on Culloden Moor. It is the northernmost city in the United Kingdom and lies within the Great Glen (Gleann Mòr) at its north-eastern extremity where the River Ness enters the Moray Firth. At the latest, a settlement was established by the 6th century with the first royal charter being granted by Dabíd mac Maíl Choluim (King David I) in the 12th century. The Gaelic king Mac Bethad Mac Findláich (MacBeth) whose 11th-century murder of King Duncan was immortalised in Shakespeare's play Macbeth, held a castle within the city where he ruled as Mormaer of Moray and Ross. The population of Inverness grew from a population of 40,949 in 2001 to 46,870 in 2012, the most recently released Mid Year estimate. The Greater Inverness area, including Culloden and Westhill, had a population of 59,910 in 2012. Inverness is one of Europe's fastest growing cities, with a quarter of the Highland population living in or around it, and is ranked fifth out of 189 British cities for its quality of life, the highest of any Scottish city. In the recent past, Inverness has experienced rapid economic growth: between 1998 and 2008, Inverness and the rest of the central Highlands showed the largest growth of average economic productivity per person in Scotland and the second greatest growth in the United Kingdom as a whole, with an increase of 86%. Inverness is twinned with one German city, Augsburg, and two French towns, La Baule and Saint-Valery-en-Caux. Inverness College is the main campus for the University of the Highlands and Islands. With around 8,500 students, Inverness College hosts around a quarter of all the University of the Highlands and Islands' students, and 30% of those studying to degree level. In 2014, a survey by a property website described Inverness as the happiest place in Scotland and the second happiest in the UK. Inverness was again found to be the happiest place in Scotland by a new study conducted in 2015.

October 28th
46630 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Kilmarnock

Population 46350

Kilmarnock (Scottish Gaelic: Cille Mheàrnaig, "Meàrnag's church") is a large burgh in East Ayrshire, Scotland with a population of 46,350, making it the 15th most populated place in Scotland and the second largest town in Ayrshire. The River Irvine runs through its eastern section, and the Kilmarnock Water passes through it, giving rise to the name 'Bank Street'. Kilmarnock is often shortened to 'Killie', especially when it is referenced in a footballing situation. Kilmarnock is the main town within East Ayrshire, and the East Ayrshire HQ is located on London Road in Kilmarnock, leading to the villages Crookedholm and Hurlford, which furthermore leads to Loudoun. The first collection of work by Scottish poet Robert Burns, Poems, chiefly in the Scottish dialect, was published here in 1786, and became known as the Kilmarnock volume. The internationally distributed whisky brand Johnnie Walker originated in the town in the 19th century. Protest and backing from the Scottish Government took place in 2009, after Diageo, the owner of Johnnie Walker announced plans to close the bottling plant in the town after 289 years. In recent years, Kilmarnock has been used for musical acts and film locations. Rock band Biffy Clyro were formed in the town in a primary school in the mid-1990s. The 2001 film, Pyaar Ishq Aur Mohabbat (2001) was shot in the town as was Manhunt (2004).

October 27th
46344 dead in the UK from COVID-19
October 26th
46077 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Sutton-in-Ashfield

Population 45848

Sutton-in-Ashfield is a market town in the Ashfield district of Nottinghamshire, England, with a population of around 45,800. It is situated four miles west of Mansfield, close to the Derbyshire border.

October 25th
45800 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Stirling

Population 45750

Stirling (/ˈstɜːrlɪŋ/; Scots: Stirlin; Scottish Gaelic: Sruighlea [ˈs̪t̪ruʝlə]) is a city in central Scotland. The city is clustered around a large fortress and medieval old town. Stirling is the administrative centre for the Stirling council area, and is traditionally the county town of Stirlingshire. The city is located several miles to the west of the mouth of the River Forth. Historically it was strategically important as the "Gateway to the Highlands", with its position near the Highland Boundary Fault between the Scottish Lowlands and Highlands and has been described as the brooch which clasps the Highlands and the Lowlands together. Its historical position as the nearest crossing of the Forth to the river mouth meant that it attracted invaders. The beast of Stirling is the wolf. According to legend, when Stirling was under attack from Viking invaders, a wolf howled, alerting the townspeople in time to save the town. Once the capital of Scotland, Stirling contains the Great Hall (restored 1999) and the Renaissance Palace (restoration completed 2011) within Stirling Castle. Stirling also has its medieval parish church, the Church of the Holy Rude, where King James VI was crowned King of Scots on 29 July 1567. The Holy Rude still functions, with a service every Sunday. Stirling is a centre for local government, higher education, retail, and industry. The 2011 census recorded the population of the city as 45,750, the wider Stirling council area has a population of 89,850. The majority of the population is located in its southeast corner, in the City of Stirling and in the surrounding area. One of the principal royal strongholds of the Kingdom of Scotland, Stirling was created a Royal burgh by King David I in 1130, which it remained until 1975, when the burgh as an administrative unit was abolished. In 2002, as part of Queen Elizabeth II's Golden Jubilee, Stirling was granted city status.

October 24th
45550 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Chippenham

Population 45337

Chippenham is an historic market town in Wiltshire, England, 13 miles (21 km) east of Bath and 96 miles (154 km) west of London. In the 2011 census, the Chippenham community area's population was recorded at 45,337, and the built up area of Chippenham had a population of 35,800 The town was established on a crossing of the River Avon and some form of settlement is believed to have existed there since before Roman times. It was a royal vill, and probably a royal hunting lodge, under Alfred the Great. The primary school, King's Lodge School, gets its name from this tradition. The town continued to grow when the Great Western Railway arrived in 1841. The town is now a commuter town. Chippenham is twinned with La Flèche in France and Friedberg in Germany. The town's motto is Unity and Loyalty.

October 23rd
45336 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Hinckley

Population 45249

Hinckley is a market town in southwest Leicestershire, England. It is administered by Hinckley and Bosworth Borough Council. Hinckley is the second largest town in the administrative county of Leicestershire, after Loughborough. Hinckley is situated near the larger town of Nuneaton in Warwickshire.

October 22nd
45114 dead in the UK from COVID-19

West Bridgford

Population 45039

West Bridgford is a town in the Rushcliffe borough of Nottinghamshire, England, immediately south of the city of Nottingham, delimited by the River Trent. It forms a continuous urban area with Nottingham, effectively making it a suburb of the city, and means it was chosen as the administrative centre for Nottinghamshire County Council. The population of the town at the 2011 census was 45,039. As part of the Rushcliffe constituency its MP is The Rt Hon Kenneth Clarke, QC (Conservative Party). The headquarters of Nottinghamshire County Council moved to the town in 1959 from the traditional county town of Nottingham. The town is enclosed by the A52 and the River Trent.

October 21st
44878 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Worksop

Population 44790

Worksop is the largest town in the Bassetlaw district of Nottinghamshire, England, on the River Ryton at the northern edge of Sherwood Forest. It is about 19 miles (31 km) east-south-east of the City of Sheffield and its population is estimated (Mid 2012) to be 44,970. It is also twinned with the German town Garbsen. Worksop is attracting an increasing quantity of commuters to the local area because of its close proximity of Nottingham, Lincoln and Sheffield. Worksop is known as the "Gateway to the Dukeries", because of the now four obsolete ducal principal sites of which were closely located next to each other, south of the town. These four ducal locations were; Clumber House, Thoresby Hall, Welbeck Abbey and Rufford Abbey.

October 20th
44657 dead in the UK from COVID-19
October 19th
44462 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Morley, West Yorkshire

Population 44440

Morley is a market town and civil parish within the City of Leeds metropolitan borough, in West Yorkshire, England. It lies approximately 5 miles (8 km) south-west of Leeds city centre. The town had a population of 44,440 in 2011 and is made up of the Morley North and South Wards. The civil parish had a population of 27,738. The town is built on seven hills, like Rome: Scatcherd Hill, Dawson Hill, Daisy Hill, Chapel Hill, Hunger Hill, Troy Hill and Banks Hill.

October 18th
44271 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Greenock

Population 44248

Greenock (/ˈɡriːnək/; Scottish Gaelic: Grianaig, pronounced [kɾʲiənɛkʲ]) is a town and administrative centre in the Inverclyde council area in Scotland and a former burgh within the historic county of Renfrewshire, located in the west central Lowlands of Scotland. It forms part of a contiguous urban area with Gourock to the west and Port Glasgow to the east. The 2011 census showed that Greenock had a population of 44,248, a decrease from the 46,861 recorded in the 2001 Census. It lies on the south bank of the Clyde at the "Tail of the Bank" where the River Clyde expands into the Firth of Clyde.

October 17th
44112 dead in the UK from COVID-19
October 16th
43935 dead in the UK from COVID-19
October 15th
43785 dead in the UK from COVID-19
October 14th
43634 dead in the UK from COVID-19
October 13th
43518 dead in the UK from COVID-19
October 12th
43408 dead in the UK from COVID-19
October 11th
43295 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Welwyn Garden City

Population 43252

Welwyn Garden City /ˈwɛlɪn/, also known locally as "WGC" or "Welwyn Garden", is a town in Hertfordshire, England. It is located approximately 19 miles (31 km) from Kings Cross, London. Welwyn Garden City was the second garden city in England (founded 1920) and one of the first new towns (designated 1948). It is unique in being both a garden city and a new town and exemplifies the physical, social and cultural planning ideals of the periods in which it was built.

October 10th
43173 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Grantham

Population 43117

Grantham (pronounced /ˈɡrænθəm/) is a market town within the South Kesteven district of Lincolnshire, England. It bestrides the London to Edinburgh East Coast Main Line railway and the River Witham, and is bounded to the west by the A1 main north-south road. Grantham is about 26 miles (42 km) south of the city and county town of Lincoln, and about 24 miles (39 km) east of the city of Nottingham. The resident population in 2014 was estimated as 43,117, excluding the adjacent villages of Great Gonerby and Barrowby. The town is best known as the birthplace of former prime minister Margaret Thatcher, and the place where Isaac Newton went to school, at The King's School. It is close to an ancient Roman road, and was the scene of Oliver Cromwell's first advantage over Royalists during the English Civil War at Gonerby Moor. Grantham is also notable for having the first female police officers in the United Kingdom, notably Edith Smith in 1914, and producing the first running diesel engine in 1892, and the UK's first tractor in 1896.

October 9th
43069 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Kingston upon Thames

Population 43013

Kingston upon Thames, also known as Kingston, is the principal settlement of the Royal Borough of Kingston upon Thames in southwest London. It was the ancient market town where Saxon kings were crowned. Kingston is situated 10 miles (16 kilometres) southwest of Charing Cross and is one of the major metropolitan centres identified in the London Plan. Kingston lies approximately 10 metres (33 ft) above sea level. Kingston was part of a large ancient parish in the county of Surrey and the town was an ancient borough, reformed in 1835. It has been the location of Surrey County Hall from 1893, extraterritorially in terms of local government administration since Kingston became part of Greater London in 1965. Most of the town centre is part of the KT1 postcode area, but some areas north of Kingston railway station have the postcode KT2 instead. The population of the town itself, comprising the four wards of Canbury, Grove, Norbiton and Tudor, was 43,013 in the 2011 census.

October 8th
42990 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Middleton, Greater Manchester

Population 42972

Middleton is a town in the Metropolitan Borough of Rochdale, Greater Manchester, England, on the River Irk 5 miles (8.0 km) south-southwest of Rochdale and 4.4 miles (7.1 km) north-northeast of Manchester city centre. In 2001, Middleton had a population of 45,580, reducing to 42,972 at the 2011 Census. It lies on the northern edge of Manchester, with Blackley to the south and Moston to the south east. Historically part of Lancashire, Middleton's name comes from it being the centre of several circumjacent settlements. It was an ecclesiastical parish of the hundred of Salford, ruled by aristocratic families. The Church of St Leonard is a Grade I listed building. The Flodden Window in the church's sanctuary is thought to be the oldest war memorial in the United Kingdom, memorialising the archers of Middleton who fought at the Battle of Flodden in 1513. In 1770, Middleton was a village of twenty houses, but in the 18th and 19th centuries it grew into a thriving and populous seat of textile manufacture and it was granted borough status in 1886. Langley in the north of the town was one of Manchester City Council's overspill council estates, whilst Alkrington in the south is a suburban area.

October 7th
42898 dead in the UK from COVID-19

King's Lynn

Population 42800

King's Lynn /ˌkɪŋz ˈlɪn/, also known as Lynn and until 1537 as Bishop's Lynn, is a seaport and market town in the ceremonial county of Norfolk in the East of England. It lies 97 miles (156 km) north of London and 44 miles (71 km) west of Norwich. The population of the town is 42,800. The town has two theatres, museums and other cultural and sporting venues. There are three secondary schools and one college. The service sector, information and communication technologies and creative industries, provide limited employment for the population of King's Lynn and the surrounding area.

October 6th
42796 dead in the UK from COVID-19
October 5th
42725 dead in the UK from COVID-19
October 4th
42653 dead in the UK from COVID-19
October 3rd
42593 dead in the UK from COVID-19
October 2nd
42526 dead in the UK from COVID-19
October 1st
42458 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 30th
42391 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 29th
42334 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 28th
42286 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 27th
42232 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Fareham

Population 42210

Fareham /ˈfɛərəm/ is a market town at the north-west tip of Portsmouth Harbour, between the cities of Portsmouth and Southampton in the south east of Hampshire, England. It gives its name to the borough that comprises the town and its surrounding area. It was historically an important manufacturer of bricks (notably used to build the Royal Albert Hall, London) and a grower of strawberries. Current employment includes retail (including Fareham Shopping Centre with around 100 shops), small-scale manufacturing, and defence (with the Royal Navy's HMS Collingwood and the Ministry of Defence's Defence Science and Technology Laboratory nearby).

September 26th
42185 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 25th
42146 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 24th
42114 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 23rd
42079 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 22nd
42023 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 21st
41984 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 20th
41957 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 19th
41926 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 18th
41906 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 17th
41882 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 16th
41855 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 15th
41829 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Urmston

Population 41825

Urmston /ˈɜːrmstən/ is a town in Trafford, Greater Manchester, England, with a population of 41,825 at the 2011 Census. Historically in Lancashire, it is about six miles (10 km) southwest of Manchester city centre. The southern boundary is the River Mersey, with Stretford lying to the east and Flixton to the west. Davyhulme lies to the north of the town centre. Urmston covers an area of 4,799 acres (19 km²). The town has early medieval origins, and until the arrival of the railway in 1873 was a small farming community. The railway acted as a catalyst, transforming the town into a residence for the middle classes. Today, Urmston is one of the major urban areas in Trafford: it includes the areas of Davyhulme and Flixton.

September 14th
41811 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 13th
41790 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 12th
41774 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 11th
41756 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 10th
41743 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 9th
41730 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 8th
41721 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 7th
41712 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 6th
41697 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 5th
41689 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 4th
41676 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 3rd
41669 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 2nd
41659 dead in the UK from COVID-19
September 1st
41650 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 31st
41647 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 30th
41638 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 29th
41632 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 28th
41627 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 27th
41617 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 26th
41609 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 25th
41598 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 24th
41586 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 23rd
41580 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 22nd
41566 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 21st
41558 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 20th
41551 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 19th
41543 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 18th
41540 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 17th
41531 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 16th
41519 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 15th
41515 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 14th
41503 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 13th
41496 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 12th
41487 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Sutton, London

Population 41483

Sutton is the principal town of the London Borough of Sutton in South London, England. It lies on the lower slopes of the North Downs, and has the administrative headquarters of the borough. It is located 10.4 miles (16.7 km) south-south west of Charing Cross, and is one of the eleven metropolitan centres identified in the London Plan. An ancient parish in the county of Surrey, Sutton is recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 as having two churches and two acres of meadow at that time. Sutton's location on the London to Brighton turnpike from 1755 led to the establishment of coaching inns, spurring its further development as a village. When it was connected to central London by rail in 1847, the village began to grow into a town, and there was significant Victorian-era expansion, both commercially and residentially. Sutton's expansion and increase in population accelerated in the 20th century as part of the suburban growth of London. It became a municipal borough with neighbouring Cheam in 1934, and has formed part of Greater London since 1965. Sutton has a theatre, the largest library in the borough, several works of public art, four conservation areas and a park and green at either end of the high street. It contains a civic and retail district, a business sector, including a number of large international companies, and the sixth most important shopping area in London, centred on Sutton High Street. Sutton mainline railway station is the largest in the borough, with frequent services to central London among other destinations. Along with Wimbledon Studios, Sutton is a hub for filming in south-west London. Sutton is home to the Royal Marsden Hospital and the Institute of Cancer Research; there are plans to create the world's second biggest cancer research campus on the site. The town has among the lowest levels of crime in Greater London. Sutton is home to a significant number of the borough's schools, within a borough which is among the top performing authorities for education in the country. In 2011 Sutton was the top performing borough for GCSE results in England.

August 11th
41480 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 10th
41470 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 9th
41457 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 8th
41449 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 7th
41435 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 6th
41423 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 5th
41414 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 4th
41408 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 3rd
41394 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 2nd
41379 dead in the UK from COVID-19
August 1st
41369 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 31st
41358 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 30th
41344 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Boston, Lincolnshire

Population 41340

Boston (/ˈbɒstən/) is a town and small port in Lincolnshire, on the east coast of England. It is the largest town of the wider Borough of Boston local government district. The borough had a total population of 64,637 at the 2011 census, while the town itself had a population of 35,124 at the 2001 census. It is due north of Greenwich on the Prime Meridian. Boston's most notable landmark is St Botolph's Church ("The Stump"), said to be the largest parish church in England, with one of the taller towers in England visible for miles around from the flat lands of Lincolnshire. Residents of Boston are known as Bostonians. Emigrants from Boston named several other settlements after the town, most notably Boston, Massachusetts, in the United States.

July 29th
41334 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 28th
41322 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 27th
41310 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 26th
41299 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 25th
41283 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Bridgwater

Population 41276

Bridgwater is a market town and civil parish in Somerset, England. At the 2011 census, it had a population of 35,886. Bridgwater is at the edge of the Somerset Levels, in level and well-wooded country; to the north are the Mendips and to the west the Quantock hills. The town lies along both sides of the River Parrett, 10 miles (16 km) from its mouth, has been a major port and trading centre and maintains a large industrial base. It is linked to Taunton by the Bridgwater and Taunton Canal. Bridgwater is between two junctions of the M5 motorway and Bridgwater railway station is on the main railway line between Bristol and Taunton. Historically, the town had a politically radical tendency. The Battle of Sedgemoor, where the Monmouth Rebellion was finally crushed in 1685, was fought nearby. Notable buildings include the Church of St Mary and the house in Blake Street, largely restored, which was the birthplace of Admiral Blake in 1598, and is now the Blake Museum. The town has an arts centre and plays host to the annual Bridgwater Guy Fawkes Carnival.

July 24th
41267 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 23rd
41260 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 22nd
41244 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 21st
41227 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 20th
41207 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 19th
41195 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 18th
41181 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Bexhill-on-Sea

Population 41173

Bexhill-on-Sea (often simply Bexhill) is a seaside town situated in the county of East Sussex in South East England. An ancient town and part of the local-government district of Rother, Bexhill is home to a number of archaeological sites, a Manor House in the Old Town, an abundance of Edwardian and Victorian architecture, and the famous De La Warr Pavilion: today a modern-art gallery – which has featured the work of Andy Warhol amongst others – and performance hall, where the likes of comedian Lee Evans and author Michael Morpurgo have appeared.

July 17th
41167 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 16th
41149 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 15th
41136 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 14th
41116 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 13th
41095 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 12th
41071 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 11th
41058 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 10th
41037 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 9th
41016 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 8th
40979 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 7th
40955 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 6th
40928 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 5th
40893 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 4th
40866 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 3rd
40833 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 2nd
40804 dead in the UK from COVID-19
July 1st
40761 dead in the UK from COVID-19
June 30th
40734 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Kingswood, South Gloucestershire

Population 40734

(Not to be confused with Kingswood, Stroud District.) Kingswood is an urban area in South Gloucestershire, England, on the eastern border of the City of Bristol.

June 29th
40687 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Bury St Edmunds

Population 40664

Bury St Edmunds is a market town in Suffolk, England. Bury St Edmunds Abbey is near the town centre. Bury is the seat of the Diocese of St Edmundsbury and Ipswich, with the episcopal see at St Edmundsbury Cathedral. The town, originally called Beodericsworth, was built on a grid pattern by Abbot Baldwin around 1080. It is known for brewing and malting (Greene King brewery) and for a British Sugar processing factory, where Silver Spoon sugar is produced. The town is the cultural and retail centre for West Suffolk and tourism is a major part of the economy.

June 28th
40648 dead in the UK from COVID-19
June 27th
40603 dead in the UK from COVID-19
June 26th
40554 dead in the UK from COVID-19
June 25th
40513 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Kirkby

Population 40472

Kirkby /ˈkɜːrbi/ is a town in the Metropolitan Borough of Knowsley, Merseyside, England. Historically in Lancashire, it developed from the 1950s to the 1970s as a housing overspill of Liverpool. It is roughly 5 miles (8 km) north of Huyton and 6 miles (10 km) north-east of Liverpool. The population in 2011 was 40,472. It is believed to have been founded in 870 although there is archaeological evidence for settlement from the Bronze Age.

June 24th
40445 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Ramsgate

Population 40408

Ramsgate is a seaside town in the district of Thanet in east Kent, England. It was one of the great English seaside towns of the 19th century. In 2001 it had a population of around 40,000. Ramsgate’s main attraction is its coastline, and its main industries are tourism and fishing. The town has one of the largest marinas on the English south coast, and the Port of Ramsgate has provided cross-channel ferries for many years.

June 23rd
40370 dead in the UK from COVID-19
June 22nd
40306 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Salisbury

Population 40302

Salisbury (various pronunciations, but locally /ˈsɔːzbri/, SAWZ-bree) is a cathedral city in Wiltshire, England, and the only city within the county. It is the third-largest settlement in the county, after Swindon and Chippenham, with a population of 40,302, unusually declining from 45,000 at the 2006 census. The city is located in the southeast of Wiltshire, near the edge of Salisbury Plain. Its cathedral was formerly located to the north at Old Sarum; following its relocation, a settlement grew up around it, drawing residents from Old Sarum and Wilton. The new town received its city charter in 1227 under the name New Sarum, which continued to be its official name until 2009, when the Salisbury City Council was established. It sits at the confluence of five rivers: the Nadder, Ebble, Wylye, and Bourne are tributary to the Hampshire Avon, which flows to the south coast and into the sea at Christchurch in Dorset. Salisbury railway station serves the city and is a regional interchange, at the crossing point between the West of England Main Line and the Wessex Main Line. Stonehenge, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, is about 8 miles (13 km) northwest of Salisbury and greatly aids the local economy. The city itself, Old Sarum, the present cathedral and the ruins of the former one also attract visitors.

June 21st
40242 dead in the UK from COVID-19
June 20th
40188 dead in the UK from COVID-19
June 19th
40128 dead in the UK from COVID-19
June 18th
40076 dead in the UK from COVID-19
June 17th
40015 dead in the UK from COVID-19
June 16th
39957 dead in the UK from COVID-19
June 15th
39873 dead in the UK from COVID-19
June 14th
39803 dead in the UK from COVID-19
June 13th
39717 dead in the UK from COVID-19
June 12th
39654 dead in the UK from COVID-19
June 11th
39574 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Cleethorpes

Population 39505

Cleethorpes is a seaside resort on the estuary of the Humber in North East Lincolnshire, England with a population of nearly 40,000 in 2011. It has been permanently occupied since the 6th century, with fishing as a primary industry, while developing as a resort since the 19th century. The town lies on the Greenwich meridian and its average annual rainfall is amongst the lowest in the British Isles.

June 10th
39494 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Farnham

Population 39488

Farnham is a town in Surrey, England, within the Borough of Waverley. The town is 34.5 miles (55.5 km) WSW of London in the extreme west of Surrey, adjacent to the border with Hampshire. By road Guildford is 11 miles (17 km) to the east and Winchester a further 28 miles (45 km) along the same axis as London. Farnham is the largest town in Waverley, and one of the five largest conurbations in Surrey. It is of historic interest, with many old buildings, including a number of Georgian houses. Farnham Castle overlooks the town. A short distance southeast of the town centre are the ruins of Waverley Abbey, Moor Park House and Mother Ludlam's Cave. Farnham is twinned with Andernach in Germany. It is drained by the River Wey (North Branch) which is navigable only to canoes at this point.

June 9th
39385 dead in the UK from COVID-19
June 8th
39295 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Glenrothes

Population 39277

Glenrothes (; /ɡlɛnˈrɒθᵻs/, glen-ROTH-iss; Scottish Gaelic: Gleann Ràthais) is a town situated in the heart of Fife, in east-central Scotland. It is located approximately 30 miles (48 km) from both Edinburgh, which lies to the south and Dundee to the north. The town had a population of 39,277 in 2011 as recorded by the census, making it the third largest settlement in Fife and the 18th most populous settlement in Scotland. The name Glenrothes comes from its historical link with the Earl of Rothes who owned much of the land upon which the new town has been built; "Glen" (Scottish for valley) was added to the name to avoid confusion with Rothes in Moray and in recognition that the town lies in a river valley. The motto of Glenrothes is "Ex terra vis", meaning "Out of the earth, strength", which dates back to the founding of the town. Planned in the late 1940s as one of Scotland's first post-second world war new towns its original purpose was to house miners who were to work at a newly established coal mine, the Rothes Colliery. Following the failure of the mine the town developed as an important industrial centre in Scotland's Silicon Glen between 1961 and 2000 with several major electronics and hi-tech companies setting up facilities in the town. The Glenrothes Development Corporation (GDC), a non-departmental public body, was established to develop, manage and promote the new town. The GDC supported by the local authority oversaw the governance of Glenrothes until the wind-up of the GDC in 1995, after which all responsibility was transferred to Fife Council. Glenrothes is the administrative capital of Fife containing both the Fife Council and Police Scotland Fife Division headquarters. Home to Fife's main concentration of specialist manufacturing and engineering companies, several organisations have their global headquarters based in Glenrothes. Public services and service industries are also important to the town's economy. Major employers include Bosch Rexroth (hydraulics manufacturing), Brand Rex (fibre optics manufacturing), Fife College (education) and Raytheon (defence and electronics). Glenrothes is unique in Fife as the majority of the town's centre is contained indoors, within Fife's largest indoor shopping centre, the Kingdom Shopping Centre. The town has won multiple horticultural awards in the "Beautiful Scotland" and "Britain in Bloom" contests for the quality of its parks and landscaping. It has numerous outdoor sculptures and artworks, a result of the appointment of town artists in the early development of the town. Public facilities include a regional sports and leisure centre, two golf courses, major parks, a civic centre and theatre and a college campus. The A92 trunk road provides the principal access to the town passing through Glenrothes and connecting it to the wider Scottish motorway and trunk road network. A major bus station is located in the town centre providing regional and local bus services to surrounding settlements.

June 7th
39171 dead in the UK from COVID-19
June 6th
39044 dead in the UK from COVID-19
June 5th
38933 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Skelmersdale

Population 38813

Skelmersdale /ˈskɛlməzˌdeɪl/ is a town in West Lancashire, England. It lies on high-ground on the River Tawd, 6 miles (10 km) to the west of Wigan, 13 miles (21 km) to the northeast of Liverpool, 15 miles (24 km) south-southwest of Preston. As of 2006, Skelmersdale had a population of 38,813, down from 41,000 in 2004. The town is known locally as Skem /ˈskɛm/.The first recorded use of the name Skelmersdale appears in the Domesday Book of 1086. It was under the rule of Uctred as part of the hundred of West Derby. The urbanisation and development of Skelmersdale largely coincided with the Industrial Revolution. Industrial scale coal mining began in the early 19th century and continued to expand during that century to give rise to Skelmersdale as an important colliery village. The town forms part of the Wigan Urban Area. Skelmersdale was designated as a new town in 1961.

June 4th
38810 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Tipton

Population 38777

Tipton is a town in the borough of Sandwell, West Midlands, England, with a population of around 38,777 at the 2011 census. Tipton is located about halfway between Birmingham and Wolverhampton. It is a part of the West Midlands conurbation and is a part of the Black Country. Historically within Staffordshire, Tipton was an urban district until 1938, when it became a municipal borough. The vast majority of the Borough of Tipton was transferred into West Bromwich County Borough in 1966, although parts of the old borough were absorbed into an expanded Dudley borough and the newly created County Borough of Warley. Along with the rest of West Bromwich and Warley, Tipton became part of the Sandwell Metropolitan Borough in 1974 and remains within this local authority to this day. Tipton was once one of the most heavily industrialised towns in the Black Country, with thousands of people employed in different sections of the town's industries, but most of its factories have closed since the 1970s and it has gradually developed into a commuter town occupied mostly by people working in other parts of the region.

June 3rd
38675 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Tonbridge

Population 38657

Tonbridge (pronunciation and historic spelling Tunbridge) is a market town in the English county of Kent, with a population of 38,657 in 2011. It is located on the River Medway, approximately 4 miles (6 km) north of Royal Tunbridge Wells, 12 miles (19 km) south west of Maidstone and 29 miles (47 km) south east of London. It belongs to the administrative borough of Tonbridge and Malling (population 120,805 in 2011). There are several independent educational establishments in the town, including the prestigious Tonbridge School.

June 2nd
38520 dead in the UK from COVID-19
June 1st
38351 dead in the UK from COVID-19
May 31st
38216 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Bishop's Stortford

Population 38202

Bishop's Stortford is a historic market town and civil parish in Hertfordshire, England. It is just west of the M11 motorway on the county boundary with Essex and is the closest sizeable town to London Stansted Airport. Bishop's Stortford is 27 miles (43 km) north east of Charing Cross in central London and 35 miles (56 km) from Liverpool Street station, the London terminus of the line to Cambridge that runs through the town. Bishop's Stortford has a population of 38,202.

May 30th
38090 dead in the UK from COVID-19
May 29th
37927 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Camberley

Population 37916

Camberley /ˈkæmbərliː/ is a town in Surrey, England, 31 miles (50 km) southwest of central London, between the M3 and M4 motorways. The town is in the far west of the county, close to the borders of Hampshire and Berkshire; the boundaries intersect on the western edge of the town where all three counties converge on the A30 national route. It is the main town in the borough of Surrey Heath. Camberley's suburbs include Crawley Hill, Yorktown, Diamond Ridge, Heatherside, and Old Dean.

May 28th
37741 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Fishponds

Population 37575

Fishponds is an outer urban area in the north-east of the English city of Bristol. It is approximately 3 miles (5 km) from the City centre. It has two large Victorian era parks; Eastville Park and Vassell's Park (formerly the Vassell's Family estate) and also known locally as Oldbury Court. The River Frome runs through both parks, with the Frome Valley Walkway running alongside it. A restored mill can be found at Snuff Mills near the Vassells Park end of the river. It has retained its original waterwheel which can still be seen and heard turning today. Eastville Park has its own large boating lake with central wildlife reserves. Fishponds is mainly a residential area through which two main bus routes pass. Housing is typically of the terraced Victorian variety. The high street has many shops, such as greengrocers and florists as well as Lidl, Aldi and Morrisons supermarkets. There is a small student population due to the presence of the Glenside campus of the University of the West of England. The name of this area of Bristol derives from when it was, like nearby Soundwell, a quarry district. The empty quarries were then filled and there were many large fishponds in the area which have since been filled in. There was one pond remaining which was, until the mid-1970s when it was officially closed, a popular swimming area, named "The Lido" by locals. It is now owned by a private angling club. The outskirts of Fishponds to the south comprise Chester Park and Mayfield Park. Fishponds is bordered by five suburbs: Downend, Staple Hill, St. George, Eastville and Stapleton. At the 2011 census the Greater Fishponds area had a population of 37,575.

May 27th
37524 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Stretford

Population 37455

Stretford (pop. 37,500) is a town in Trafford, Greater Manchester, England. Lying on flat ground between the River Mersey and the Manchester Ship Canal, it is 3.8 miles (6.1 km) to the southwest of Manchester city centre, 3.0 miles (4.8 km) south-southwest of Salford and 4.2 miles (6.8 km) northeast of Altrincham. Stretford is contiguous with the suburb of Chorlton-cum-Hardy to the east, and the towns of Urmston to the west, Salford to the north, and Sale to the south. The Bridgewater Canal bisects the town. Historically in Lancashire, during much of the 19th century Stretford was an agricultural village, with its own market, known locally as Porkhampton, a reference to the large number of pigs produced for the nearby Manchester market. It was also an extensive market gardening area, producing more than 500 long tons (508 t) of vegetables each week for sale in Manchester by 1845. The arrival of the Manchester Ship Canal in 1894, and the subsequent development of the Trafford Park industrial estate in the north of the town, accelerated the industrialisation that had begun in the late 19th century. By 2001 less than one per cent of Stretford's population was employed in agriculture. Stretford has been the home of Manchester United Football Club since 1910, and of Lancashire County Cricket Club since 1864. Notable residents have included the industrialist, philanthropist, and Manchester's first multi-millionaire John Rylands, the suffragette Emmeline Pankhurst, the painter L. S. Lowry, Morrissey, Joy Division frontman Ian Curtis and Jay Kay of Jamiroquai.

May 26th
37327 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Port Talbot

Population 37276

Port Talbot (/pərˈtɔːlbət/ or /pərˈtælbət/) is a town in the county borough of Neath Port Talbot, Wales. It had a population of 37,276 in 2011. It is best known as the home of the Port Talbot Steelworks, one of biggest steelworks in the world, which currently employs an estimated 10% of the town's population. The steelworks has for many years been under threat of closure.

May 25th
37114 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Beeston, Nottinghamshire

Population 37010

(For other uses, see Beeston (disambiguation).) Beeston is a town in Nottinghamshire, England. It is 3.4 miles (5.5 km) southwest of Nottingham city centre. Although typically regarded as a suburb of the City of Nottingham, and officially designated as part of the Nottingham Urban Area, for local government purposes it is in the borough of Broxtowe, lying outside the City's unitary authority area. To the immediate northeast is the University of Nottingham's main campus, University Park. The pharmaceutical and retail chemist group Boots has its headquarters on a large campus just 0.6 miles (1 km) east of the centre of Beeston, falling on the border of Broxtowe and the City of Nottingham. To the south is the River Trent, Attenborough and its extensive wetlands.

May 24th
36913 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Small Heath

Population 36898

Small Heath is an area in South-East Birmingham, West Midlands, England. It is situated on and around the A45 (Coventry Road) Small Heath is host to many thriving local businesses.

May 23rd
36717 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Whitley Bay

Population 36623

Whitley Bay is a seaside town on the north east coast of England. Historically in Northumberland, it is now part of Tyne and Wear.

May 22nd
36497 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Sheffield Central ward

Population 36412

City ward — which includes the districts of Highfield, Kelham Island and the city centre — is one of the 28 electoral wards in City of Sheffield, England. It covers the central area of the city. The ward was created following the 2015 local government boundary review out of part of the old Central ward, which, with a population of 36,412, was the largest ward in the UK. City is one of the wards that make up the Sheffield Central constituency.

May 21st
36274 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Gorton

Population 36055

(For other uses, see Gorton (disambiguation).) Gorton is an area of the city of Manchester in North West England, southeast of the city centre. The population at the 2011 census was 36,055. Neighbouring areas include Longsight and Levenshulme. A major landmark is Gorton Monastery, a 19th century High Victorian Gothic former Franciscan friary.

May 20th
36036 dead in the UK from COVID-19
May 19th
35768 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Redcar

Population 35692

Redcar is a seaside resort and town in the Tees Valley in North Yorkshire, England. The local council, a unitary authority, is Redcar and Cleveland. Historically part of the North Riding of Yorkshire, it lies 7.5 miles (12.1 km) east-north-east of Middlesbrough by the North Sea coast.The combined population of the wards of Coatham, Dormanstown, Kirkleatham, Newcomen, West Dyke and Zetland was 36,610 in the 2001 census decreasing to 35,692 in the 2011 census.

May 18th
35493 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Woodley, Berkshire

Population 35470

Woodley is a town and civil parish in Berkshire, England. It is a suburb of Reading, situated 4 miles (6.4 km) east of the town centre and is joined to the neighbouring suburb of Earley,(2 miles (3.2 km) to the west, and 4 miles (6.4 km) from the market town of Wokingham. Nearby are the villages of Sonning, Twyford, Winnersh, Hurst, and Charvil.

May 17th
35200 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Falkirk

Population 35168

Falkirk (/ˈfɒlkɜːrk/ or /ˈfɔːkɜːrk/; Scots: The Fawkirk; Scottish Gaelic: An Eaglais Bhreac) is a large town in the Central Lowlands of Scotland, historically within the county of Stirlingshire. It lies in the Forth Valley, 23.3 miles (37.5 km) north-west of Edinburgh and 20.5 miles (33.0 km) north-east of Glasgow. Falkirk had a resident population of 32,422 at the 2001 census. The population of the town had risen to 34,570 according to a 2008 estimate, making it the 20th most populous settlement in Scotland. Falkirk is the main town and administrative centre of the Falkirk council area, which has an overall population of 156,800 and inholds the nearby towns of Grangemouth, Bo'ness, Denny, Larbert and Stenhousemuir. The town lies at the junction of the Forth and Clyde Canal and the Union Canal, a location which proved key to the growth of Falkirk as a centre of heavy industry during the Industrial Revolution. In the 18th and 19th centuries Falkirk was at the centre of the iron and steel industry, underpinned by the Carron Company in the nearby village of Carron. The company was responsible for making carronades for the Royal Navy and also later many pillar boxes. In the last 50 years heavy industry has waned, and the economy of the town relies increasingly on retail and tourism. Despite this, Falkirk remains the home of many international companies like Alexander Dennis, the largest bus production company in the United Kingdom. Falkirk has a long association with the publishing industry. The company now known as Johnston Press was established in the town in 1846. The company, now based in Edinburgh, produces the Falkirk Herald, the largest selling weekly newspaper in Scotland. Attractions in and around Falkirk include the Falkirk Wheel, The Helix (home to The Kelpies), Callendar House and Park and remnants of the Antonine Wall. In a 2011 poll conducted by STV, it was voted as Scotland's most beautiful town, ahead of Perth and Stirling in 2nd and 3rd place respectively.

May 16th
34933 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Ewell

Population 34872

(This article is about the town in Surrey. For other uses, see Ewell (disambiguation).) Ewell (/ˈjuːᵊl/ YOUW-el) is a suburban area in the borough of Epsom and Ewell in Surrey with a largely commercial village centre. Apart from this it has named neighbourhoods: West Ewell, Ewell Court, East Ewell, Ewell Grove, and Ewell Downs. One rural locality on the slopes of the North Downs is also a neighbourhood, North Looe. Remaining a large parish, Ewell occupies approximately the north-eastern half of the borough minus Stoneleigh. It borders a south-west boundary of Greater London at Cheam and is within the capital's commuter belt and contiguous suburbs of the Greater London Built-up Area, 12 miles (19 km) from its centre. Ewell has the main spring, with an adjoining pond, at the head of the Hogsmill river, a small tributary of the River Thames. A majority – 73% – of the population of Ewell is in the ABC1 social class

May 15th
34619 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Exmouth

Population 34432

Exmouth /ˈɛksməθ/ is a port town, civil parish and seaside resort in East Devon, England, sited on the east bank of the mouth of the River Exe. In 2011, it had a population of 34,432 making Exmouth the 5th most populous settlement in Devon.

May 14th
34305 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Radcliffe, Greater Manchester

Population 34239

Radcliffe is a town in the Metropolitan Borough of Bury, Greater Manchester, England. It lies in the Irwell Valley 2.5 miles (4 km) south-west of Bury and 6.5 miles (10.5 km) north-northwest of Manchester and is contiguous with Whitefield to the south. The disused Manchester, Bolton & Bury Canal bisects the town. Historically a part of Lancashire, evidence of Mesolithic, Roman and Norman activity has been found in Radcliffe and its surroundings. A Roman road passes through the area, along the border between Radcliffe and Bury. Radcliffe appears in an entry of the Domesday Book as "Radeclive" and in the High Middle Ages formed a small parish and township centred on the Church of St Mary and the manorial Radcliffe Tower, both of which are Grade I listed buildings. Coal lies under the area of mines opened in the Industrial Revolution, providing fuel for the cotton spinning and papermaking industries. By the mid-19th century, Radcliffe was an important mill town with cotton mills, bleachworks and a road, canal and railway network. With a population of 34,239, falling to 29,950 at the Census in 2011. Radcliffe is predominantly a residential area whose few remaining cotton mills are now occupied by small businesses.

May 13th
33971 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Nechells

Population 33957

Nechells is a district ward in central Birmingham, England, with a population of 33,957, according to the 2011 Census. It is also a ward within the formal district of Ladywood. Nechells local government ward includes areas, for example parts of Birmingham city centre, which are not part of the historic district of Nechells as such, now often referred to in policy documents as "North Nechells, Bloomsbury and Duddeston".

May 12th
33654 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Forest Gate

Population 33619

Forest Gate is a residential area in the London Borough of Newham, 7 miles northeast of Charing Cross. It is bordered by Manor Park to the east and to the west lies Stratford town centre. Forest Gate is 1.5 miles east of Westfield Stratford City and the 2012 Olympic Park. The northern half of the busy Green Street runs through it and from 2018 it will have a Crossrail station.

May 11th
33333 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Huyton

Population 33193

Huyton (/ˈhaɪtən/ HY-tən) is a town in the Metropolitan Borough of Knowsley, in Merseyside, England. It is part of the Liverpool Urban Area sharing borders with the Liverpool suburbs of Dovecot, Knotty Ash, Belle Vale and has close associations with its neighbour the village of Roby, both were formerly part of the Huyton with Roby Urban District between 1894 and 1974. Historically in Lancashire, Huyton was an ancient parish which, in the mid-19th century, contained Croxteth Park, Knowsley and Tarbock, in addition to the township of Huyton-with-Roby. It was part of West Derby (hundred), an ancient subdivision of Lancashire, covering the south-west of the county.

May 10th
33024 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Washwood Heath

Population 32921

Washwood Heath is a ward in Birmingham, within the formal district of Hodge Hill, roughly two miles north-east of Birmingham city centre, England. Washwood Heath covers the areas of Birmingham that lie between Nechells, Bordesley Green, Stechford and Hodge Hill.

May 9th
32676 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Bicester

Population 32642

Bicester (/ˈbɪstər/ BIS-tər) is a town and civil parish in the Cherwell district of northeastern Oxfordshire in England. This historic market centre is one of the fastest growing towns in Oxfordshire. Development has been favoured by its proximity to junction 9 of the M40 motorway linking it to London, Birmingham and Banbury. It has good road links to Oxford, Kidlington, Brackley, Buckingham, Aylesbury, Witney and Carterton, as well as a railway stations on two axes; Bicester North and Bicester Village. It has its own town council, approximately a one quarter of the population hence ward contribution to the District Council and further representation as to different local governmental matters on the County Council. The other large town in the district is Banbury. In 2014 the Government in concert with the local planning authority planned for Bicester to become a garden city on the basis of the size of its buffers, distance from the Metropolitan Green Belt and in part to accommodate the demand of commuters to London and Oxford. Up to 13,000 new homes will be built.

May 8th
32298 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Aston

Population 32286

Aston is an area in Central Birmingham, in the West Midlands of England. Commencing immediately to the north-east of the city centre, Aston constitutes a ward within the unitary authority.

May 7th
31915 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Plaistow, Newham

Population 31874

Plaistow (/ˈplɑːstoʊ/ PLAHST-oh or /ˈplæstoʊ/ PLAST-oh) is an urban area in the London Borough of Newham in east London immediately south of West Ham. It forms the majority of the London E13 postcode district. Plaistow is a residential area, including several council estates. The main roads are the A112, Prince Regent Lane/ Greengate Street/ The Broadway/ High Street/ Plaistow Road, which is a former Roman road, and the A124 (Barking Road), which passes south west/ north east through Plaistow and past the West Ham United football ground. Commercial and retail premises are on the A112 at Greengate Street leading north and Prince Regent Lane south, leading 0.3 miles (0.48 km) to Newham Sixth Form College and along the A124. It contains generally smaller shops compared to Stratford or West Ham. Plaistow North and Plaistow South are two of the ten wards making up the UK parliamentary constituency of West Ham.

May 6th
31454 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Bordesley Green

Population 31343

Bordesley Green is an inner-city area of Birmingham, England about two miles east of the city centre. It also contains a road of the same name. It is also a ward in the formal district of Hodge Hill. Neighbouring areas include, Alum Rock, Saltley, Small Heath and Yardley. Heartlands Hospital is located in the eastern part of Bordesley Green. The area is also served by Yardley Green Medical Centre and Omnia Practice. Kingfisher Country Park covers the River Cole recreation grounds which are partially covered by the area's boundaries.

May 5th
30993 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Pontefract

Population 30881

Pontefract is a historic market town in West Yorkshire, England, near the A1 (or Great North Road) and the M62 motorway. Historically part of the West Riding of Yorkshire, it is one of the five towns in the metropolitan borough of the City of Wakefield and has a population of 28,250, increasing to 30,881 at the 2011 Census. Pontefract's motto is Post mortem patris pro filio, Latin for "After the death of the father, support the son", a reference to English Civil War Royalist sympathies.

May 4th
30529 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Winsford

Population 30481

Winsford is a town and civil parish within the unitary authority of Cheshire West and Chester and the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England. It lies on the River Weaver south of Northwich and west of Middlewich, and grew around the salt mining industry after the river was canalised in the 18th century, allowing freight to be conveyed northwards to the Port of Runcorn on the River Mersey. Winsford is split into three neighbourhoods: Over on the western side of the River Weaver, Wharton on the eastern side, and Swanlow and Dene as shown on the official map of Winsford in the Town Council Office in Wyvern House. Many Winsfordians consider the town to be "the heart of Cheshire" however other towns in Cheshire also claim this title.

May 3rd
30045 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Newry

Population 29946

Newry (/ˈnjʊəri/; from Irish: An Iúraigh) is a city in Northern Ireland, 34 miles (55 km) from Belfast and 67 miles (108 km) from Dublin. It had a population of 29,946 in 2011. Newry was founded in 1144 alongside a Cistercian monastery, although there are references to earlier settlements in the area. It is one of Ireland's oldest towns. Newry is at the entry to the "Gap of the North", close to the border with the Republic of Ireland. It grew as a market town and a garrison and became a port in 1742 when it was linked to Lough Neagh by the first summit-level canal built in Ireland or Great Britain. In 2002, as part of Queen Elizabeth's Golden Jubilee celebrations, Newry was granted city status along with Lisburn.

May 2nd
29596 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Sevenoaks

Population 29506

Sevenoaks is a town and civil parish with a population of 29,506 situated in western Kent, England, south-east of London. The population of the civil parish had reduced to 20,409 at the 2011 Census. It is served by a commuter main line railway and is 21 miles (34 km) south-east of London Charing Cross. The town gives its name to the Sevenoaks district, of which it is the principal town, followed by Swanley and Edenbridge. A settlement was recorded in the 13th century, when a market was established. Construction of Knole House in the 15th century helped develop the village. Sevenoaks became part of the modern communications network when one of the early turnpikes was opened in the 18th century; the railway was relatively late in reaching it. In the 21st century, it has a large commuting population, although the nearby Fort Halstead defence installation is a major local employer. Located to the south-east of the town is Knole Park, within which lies Knole House. Educational establishments in the town include the independent Sevenoaks School and Knole Academy.

May 1st
29102 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Cannock

Population 29018

Cannock (/ˈkænək/), as of the 2011 census, has a population of 29,018, and is the most populous of the three towns in the district of Cannock Chase in the central southern part of the county of Staffordshire in the West Midlands region of England. Cannock lies to the north of the West Midlands conurbation on the M6, A34 and A5 roads, and to the south of Cannock Chase, an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB). Cannock is served by a railway station on the Chase Line. The town comprises four district council electoral wards and the Cannock South ward includes the civil parish of Bridgtown, but the rest of Cannock is unparished. Cannock forms part of the Cannock Built-up Area (population 86,121 in the 2011 census) which also includes Cheslyn Hay, Great Wyrley, Hednesford, Huntington, Heath Hayes and Wimblebury.

April 30th
28534 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Willenhall

Population 28480

Willenhall is a medium-sized town in the Metropolitan Borough of Walsall, in the West Midlands, England, with a population taken at the 2011 census of 28,480. It is situated between Wolverhampton and Walsall, historically in the county of Staffordshire. It lies upon the River Tame, and is part of the Black Country. The urban district of Willenhall (established by the Local Government Act 1894) was partitioned in 1966 between the county boroughs of Walsall and Wolverhampton (since 1974 the metropolitan boroughs of Walsall and Wolverhampton). The northern border of Willenhall has always been adjoining green belt land, although Willenhall has expanded so much in the last 100 years that its northern border has been moved by about two miles. This is mostly due to housing developments in the Short Heath and New Invention areas. The town is historically famous for the manufacture of locks and keys. As early as 1770 Willenhall contained 148 skilled locksmiths and its coat of arms reflects the importance of this industry to its growth. It was home to the National Union of Lock and Metal Workers from 1889 until 2004. Its motto is Salus Populi Suprema Lex - The welfare of the people is the highest law.

April 29th
27983 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Bearsden

Population 27967

Bearsden (/ˌbɛərzˈdɛn/) is a town in East Dunbartonshire, Scotland. It lies on the northwestern fringe of Greater Glasgow, approximately 6 miles (10 km) from the City Centre, and is effectively a suburb, with housing development coinciding with the introduction of a railway line in 1863, and from where the town gets its name (Bearsden station was named after a nearby cottage). Bearsden was ranked the 7th-wealthiest area in Britain in a 2005 survey, and has the least social housing of any town in Scotland. The Roman Antonine Wall runs through the town and the remains of a military Bath House can be seen near the town centre. In 1649, the first New Kilpatrick parish church was built, and became the centre of administration for the area. The town's official Gaelic name Cille Phàdraig Ùr (meaning "new church of Patrick") reflects the name of the parish. By the early 20th century, a town had grown up with large town houses, primarily occupied by wealthy commuter businesspeople. Further development of more affordable housing has increased the population of the town to approximately 28,000 and the town remains affluent. Formerly a Burgh, local government of the town is now the responsibility of East Dunbartonshire Council which, until 2011, had some departmental offices at Boclair House in the town.

April 28th
27412 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Consett

Population 27394

(See also: Consett (UK Parliament constituency)) Consett is a town in the northwest of County Durham, England, about 14 miles (23 km) southwest of Newcastle upon Tyne. It is home to 27,394 (2001). Consett sits high on the edge of the Pennines. In 1841, it was a village community of only 145, but it was about to become a boom town: below the ground was coking coal and blackband iron ore, and nearby was limestone. These were the three ingredients needed for blast furnaces to produce iron and steel. The town is perched on the steep eastern bank of the River Derwent and owes its origins to industrial development arising from lead mining in the area, together with the development of the steel industry in the Derwent Valley, which is said to have been initiated by immigrant German cutlers and sword-makers from Solingen, who settled in the village of Shotley Bridge during the seventeenth century. During the 17th and 18th centuries, the Derwent Valley was the cradle of the British steel industry, helped by the easy availability of coal in the area and the import of high quality iron ore from Sweden via the port of Newcastle upon Tyne. However, following the invention of the Bessemer process in the 19th century, steel could be made from British iron ore (which was otherwise too heavily contaminated by phosphorus) and the Derwent Valley's geographical advantage was lost, allowing Sheffield to become the leading centre of the British steel industry.

April 27th
26851 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Clifton, Nottingham

Population 26835

Clifton is a former village and historic manor, now situated within the suburbs of the city of Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England. Clifton has 2 wards in the City of Nottingham (North and South) with a total population taken at the 2011 Census of 26,835. The Manor of Clifton was for many centuries the seat of the de Clifton (later Clifton) family, branches of which were in the 17th century created Baron Clifton of Leighton Bromswold (1608) and Clifton baronets (1611). It is now the site of a council estate. The location also encompasses Clifton Grove and Clifton Village, a picturesque residential area set alongside the River Trent. The village is notable for many old buildings including Clifton Hall, former seat of the Clifton family, and St. Mary's Church.

April 26th
26256 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Middleton, Leeds

Population 26228

Middleton is a largely residential suburb of Leeds in West Yorkshire, England and historically a village in the West Riding of Yorkshire. It is situated on a hill 4 miles (6 km) south of Leeds city centre and 165 miles (266 km) north north-west of London. In 2001 the population of the Middleton Park ward of Leeds City Council was 27,487, reducing to 26,228 at the 2011 Census. Middleton was occupied before the Norman Conquest and recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086. It developed as a manorial estate and its owners began to exploit the coal seams that outcropped within its boundaries. At the start of the Industrial Revolution a wooden wagonway was built to link the coal pits to Leeds. The colliery agent, John Blenkinsop designed an iron railway and its first steam-powered locomotive which was built by Matthew Murray in Holbeck. The coal mines on which the local economy was based lasted until 1967 and the railway is a preserved and run by a trust after operating for 200 years. Middleton Park, a remnant of the manorial estate, contains a large area of ancient woodland and parts of it, where coal was mined, are designated a scheduled ancient monument. It was the location of Middleton Hall and Middleton Lodge, homes to the local gentry. The village developed along Town Street, a school, chapel and church were built in the 19th century but after the land was acquired by Leeds Council in 1920 a large council housing estate was built on the flatter land to the south, completely changing the rural nature of the settlement. Early transport was provided by a tram line and the Leeds Ring Road was built to Middleton. After the colliery closed the area began to decline and by 2001, had areas of multiple deprivation and high levels of unemployment and anti-social behaviour. The Middleton Regeneration Board has been established with the remit of addressing these issues.

April 25th
25623 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Bilston

Population 25576

Bilston is a town in the English county of West Midlands, situated in the southeastern corner of the City of Wolverhampton. Historically in Staffordshire, three wards of Wolverhampton City Council cover the town: Bilston East and Bilston North, which almost entirely comprise parts of the historic Borough of Bilston, and Ettingshall which comprises a part of Bilston and parts of Wolverhampton.

April 24th
24976 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Westhoughton

Population 24974

Westhoughton /wɛstˈhɔːtən/ is a town and civil parish of the Metropolitan Borough of Bolton in Greater Manchester, England. It is 4 miles (6 km) southwest of Bolton, 5 miles (8 km) east of Wigan and 13 miles (21 km) northwest of Manchester. Historically in Lancashire, Westhoughton was once a centre for coal mining, cotton-spinning and textile manufacture. Today it is predominantly a residential town with a population of 23,056, increasing to 24,974 at the 2011 Census. Westhoughton incorporates several former villages and hamlets which have their own distinctive character, sports traditions and amenities including railway stations. They include Wingates (famous for the Wingates Band), White Horse, Over Hulton, Four Gates (or Fourgates), Chequerbent, which was all but destroyed by the building of the M61 motorway, Hunger Hill, Snydale, Hart Common, Marsh Brook, Daisy Hill and Dobb Brow.

April 23rd
24293 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Farnley, Leeds

Population 24213

Farnley village (also known as New Farnley) is a district in Leeds, West Yorkshire, England, 2 miles (3.2 km) south-west of Leeds city centre, between Wortley, Bramley and the surrounding countryside, in the LS12 Leeds postcode area. The appropriate Leeds City Ward is called Farnley and Wortley with a population of 24,213 according to the 2011 Census. The village was mentioned in the 1086 Domesday Book as Fernelei. New Farnley is a nearby commuter village.

April 22nd
23617 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Chapel Allerton

Population 23536

Chapel Allerton is an inner suburb of north-east Leeds, West Yorkshire, England, 2 miles (3.2 km) from the city centre. The Chapel Allerton electoral ward includes areas otherwise referred to as Chapeltown and Potternewton – the suburb is generally considered to be only the northern part of this. The ward population was given as 18,206 in the 2001 census, increasing to 23,536 at the 2011 Census.

April 21st
22886 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Walton-on-Thames

Population 22834

Walton-on-Thames /ˈwɔːltən ɒn ˈtɛmz/ is a town on the River Thames in the Elmbridge borough of Surrey. An outlying suburb of London, the town is centred 15.3 miles (24.6 km) south west of Charing Cross and is between the towns of Weybridge (to the south-west) and Molesey (to the north-east). Its waterside has the Thames Path National Trail between Sunbury Lock and Shepperton Lock. Its own localities include Ashley Park and Field Common. Its station on the South West Main Line has proven important to its development – its services run with a minimum of one stop before London Waterloo station. The town is divided into four wards and is a local hub in terms of retail and services.

April 20th
22142 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Newton-le-Willows

Population 22114

Newton-le-Willows, formerly Newton-in-Makerfield, is a market town in the Metropolitan Borough of St Helens, in Merseyside, England. Historically a part of Lancashire, it is situated about midway (about 15 miles (24 km) from each) between the cities of Liverpool and Manchester, 4 miles (6 km) to the east of St Helens, 5 miles (8 km) to the north of Warrington and 7 miles (11 km) to the south of Wigan. The population of the town taken at the 2011 census was 22,114.

April 19th
21359 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Darton

Population 21345

Darton is a large village in the Metropolitan Borough of Barnsley (part of South Yorkshire, England), on the border with West Yorkshire. At the time of the 2001 UK census, it had a population of 14,927, increasing to 21,345 for both Darton Wards (East & West) at the 2011 Census.

April 18th
20591 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Hedge End

Population 20573

Hedge End is a village and civil parish in Hampshire, England. Situated to the east of the City of Southampton, it adjoins the districts of West End and Botley. Hedge End lies within the Borough of Eastleigh and is part of the Southampton Urban Area. The original hamlet developed on Botley Common after 1250 when it was granted to the men of Botley as common pasture. In 1267, royal charters allowed Botley to hold an annual fair and a weekly market on the common which eventually became a market town.

April 17th
19791 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Stamford, Lincolnshire

Population 19701

Stamford is a town on the River Welland in Lincolnshire, England, 92 miles (148 km) north of London on the A1. The population at the 2001 census was 21,800 including the adjacent parish of St Martin's Without. The town has 17th and 18th-century stone buildings, older timber-framed buildings and five medieval parish churches. In 2013, Stamford was rated the best place to live by the Sunday Times.

April 16th
18972 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Southbourne, Dorset

Population 18960

Southbourne is a suburb of Bournemouth in the English county of Dorset. It is the most easterly part of the Borough of Bournemouth, situated between Boscombe and Christchurch. The area was previously known as Stourfield. Strictly, Southbourne refers to the area near to the coast; areas further inland are West Southbourne, Tuckton and Wick.

April 15th
18130 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Berkhamsted

Population 18100

Berkhamsted /ˈbɜːrkəmstɛd/ is a medium-sized historic market town on the western edge of Hertfordshire, England. The affluent commuter town is located in the small Bulbourne valley in the Chiltern Hills, 26 miles (42 km) northwest of London. Berkhamsted is a civil parish, with a town council within the larger borough of Dacorum. People have been living in the Berkhamsted area for over 5,000 years, including evidence of flint working in the Neolithic period and metal working in the late Iron Age and Roman periods. The high street is on a pre-Roman route known by its Saxon name Akeman Street. The earliest written reference to Berkhamsted is in 970AD. Berkhamsted was recorded as a 'burbium' (an ancient borough) in the Domesday Book in 1086. The oldest known extant jettied timber-framed building in Great Britain, built 1277 - 1297, survives as a shop on the town's high street. In the 13th and 14th century the town was a wool trading town, with thriving local market. The most important event in the town's history was in December 1066. After William the Conqueror defeated King Harold's Anglo-Saxon army at the Battle of Hastings, the Anglo-Saxon leadership surrendered to the Norman encampment at Berkhamsted. The event was recorded in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. From 1066 to 1495, Berkhamsted Castle was a favoured residence held by many English royals, including Henry II and Edward, the Black Prince; and historical figures such as Thomas Becket and Geoffrey Chaucer. After the castle was abandoned in 1495 the town went into decline, losing its borough status in the second half of the 17th century. Modern Berkhamsted began to expand following the construction of the canal and the railway in the 19th century. Among those born in Berkhamsted was Colonel Daniel Axtell, who was the captain of the Parliamentary Guard at the trial and execution of Charles I in 1649. The towns literary connections include the 17th century hymnist and poet, William Cowper, the 18th century writer Maria Edgeworth, and the 20th century novelist Graham Greene. The town is the location of Berkhamsted School, a co-educational boarding independent school, founded in 1541 by John Incent, Dean of St Paul's Cathedral; and Ashlyns School a state school whose history began as the Foundling Hospital established in London by Thomas Coram, in 1742. The town is home to the Rex Cinema (a highly regarded independent cinema) and the British Film Institute's BFI National Archive at King's Hill, one of the largest film and television archives in the world, which was endowed by J. Paul Getty, Jr.

April 14th
17249 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Ash, Surrey

Population 17166

Ash is a village and civil parish in the far west of the borough of Guildford, Surrey. Ash is on the eastern side of the River Blackwater, with railway station on the Reading-Guildford-Gatwick line, and direct roads to Aldershot, Farnham and Guildford. The 2011 census counted the residents of the main ward of Ash, which excludes Ash Vale, as 6,120. It is within the Aldershot Urban Area (the Blackwater Valley) and adjoins the riverside in the east of that large town; Ash has a small museum, large secondary school and a library.

April 13th
16390 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Stone, Staffordshire

Population 16385

Stone is an old market town in Staffordshire, England, situated about 7 miles (11 km) north of Stafford, and around 7 miles (11 km) south of the city of Stoke-on-Trent. It is the second town, after Stafford itself, in the Borough of Stafford, and has long been of importance from the point of view of communications. Stone gave its name to both an urban district council and a rural district council before becoming part of the borough in 1974.

April 12th
15495 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Stoke Gifford

Population 15494

Stoke Gifford is a large dormitory village, and parish in South Gloucestershire, England, in the northern suburbs of Bristol. It had around 11,000 residents at the 2001 census, increasing to 15,494 at the 2011 census. It is home to Bristol Parkway station, on the London-South Wales railway line, and the Bristol offices of Aviva which took over Friends Life in 2015, Hewlett Packard and The University of the West of England. The parish includes neighbouring Little Stoke, Harry Stoke and Stoke Park. The parish borders Filton, to the south-west, Patchway to the north west, Bradley Stoke to the north and Winterbourne and Hambrook to the east. To the south Stoke Gifford is served by the Bristol Ring Road, south of this a large green area known as the 'Green Lung' stretches to the inner city area of St Werburgh's.

April 11th
14537 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Bassett, Southampton

Population 14532

(This article is about the neighbourhood to the west of Bassett Wood/Bassett Avenue. For the neighbourhood to the east, see Bassett Green.) Bassett is a suburb and electoral ward of the City of Southampton, England. The suburb lies to the north of the city centre and is largely residential, including the University of Southampton's Glen Eyre Halls of residence complex (including Chamberlain), which houses around 2,100 students. Bassett gives its name to part of the A33 arterial road which links the city centre to the M3, described by Pevsner & Lloyd as "part of the splendid tree-lined route into Southampton from Winchester, London and the north". The highest point in the City of Southampton (its "county top") lies on Bassett Avenue at a height of 82 metres (269 ft) above sea level. Bassett Ward comprises Bassett, Bassett Green and Lordswood. It had a population of 14,532 at the 2011 census.

April 10th
13582 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Carluke

Population 13579

The town of Carluke (Gaelic: Cathair MoLuaig) lies in the heart of the Lanarkshire countryside in South Lanarkshire, Scotland, 4.7 miles (7.6 kilometres) northwest of Lanark and 4.2 mi (6.8 km) southeast of Wishaw. Carluke is largely a commuting town, with a variety of small stores and supermarkets available at its centre. The surrounding villages of Braidwood, Forth, Kilncadzow, and Law are supported by the various shops and services available in Carluke.

April 9th
12638 dead in the UK from COVID-19

North Walsham

Population 12634

North Walsham is a market town and civil parish in Norfolk, England in the North Norfolk district.

April 8th
11638 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Fairwater, Torfaen

Population 11632

Fairwater is a community and suburb of Cwmbran in the county borough of Torfaen, in south east Wales, and was built by the Cwmbran Development Corporation between 1963 and 1966.

April 7th
10565 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Wells, Somerset

Population 10536

Wells (/wɛlz/) is a cathedral city and civil parish in the Mendip district of Somerset, on the southern edge of the Mendip Hills. Although the population recorded in the 2011 census was only 10,536, it has had city status since medieval times, because of the presence of Wells Cathedral. Often described as England's smallest city, it is second only to the City of London in area and population, though not part of a larger urban agglomeration. The name Wells comes from three wells dedicated to Saint Andrew, one in the market place and two within the grounds of the Bishop's Palace and cathedral. A small Roman settlement surrounded them, which grew in importance and size under the Anglo-Saxons when King Ine of Wessex founded a minster church there in 704. The community became a trading centre based on cloth making and Wells is notable for its 17th century involvement in both the English Civil War and Monmouth Rebellion. In the 19th century, transport infrastructure improved with stations on three different railway lines. However, since 1964 the city has been without a railway link. The cathedral and the associated religious and architectural history have made Wells a tourist destination, which provides much of the employment. The city has a variety of sporting and cultural activities and houses several schools including The Blue School, a state coeducational comprehensive school originally founded in 1641 and the independent Wells Cathedral School, which was founded possibly as early as 909 and is one of the five established musical schools for school-age children in the United Kingdom. The historic architecture of the city has also been used as a location for several films and television programmes.

April 6th
9563 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Hebden Royd

Population 9558

Hebden Royd is a civil parish with a town council in the Metropolitan Borough of Calderdale in West Yorkshire, England. According to the 2001 census it had a population of 9,092, rising to 9,558 at the 2011 census. It includes Hebden Bridge, Mytholmroyd and Cragg Vale. The parish was an urban district before 1974, created in 1937 by the merger of Hebden Bridge and Mytholmroyd urban districts. The area now shares the HX7 postcode area. Hebden Bridge Town Hall and adjoining fire station is a Grade II listed building, built in 1897. The building was transferred from Calderdale Metropolitan Borough Council to Hebden Bridge Community Association in 2010, along with funds for basic maintenance work. Substantial volunteer time was put into renovation works and fundraising to secure the building’s future. A £4 million project built a small enterprise centre and new community facilities on land adjacent to the Town Hall. More than 450 local people have signed up as "Friends of the Town Hall" and can vote for the trustees. Hebden Royd lies close to the Pennine Way and Hardcastle Crags and is popular for outdoor pursuits such as walking, climbing and cycling. It lies on the Rochdale Canal – a through route across the Pennines. The area's location in the valley causes problems with flooding, particularly between Hebden Water and the cinema on New Road, Brearley Fields in Mytholmroyd, and further up the valley at Callis Bridge by the sewage works and the old Aquaspersions factory. Flooding at Callis Bridge is so frequent that the level of the River Calder has been lowered and special perforated kerbstones fitted so that water can drain back into the river. Brearley, on a flood plain, contains the playing fields for Calder High School and local football, rugby league and cricket teams. Hebden Royd suffered two devastating floods in the summer of 2012, and again at Christmas 2015; Todmorden, Mytholmroyd, Sowerby Bridge and York were also affected, with houses, pubs, shops and community centres suffering damage to property. The extent of the Hebden Royd flooding was shown in drone videos of the flooded areas, the most severe flooding occurring in Hebden Bridge town centre. Hebden Royd suffered the worst flooding ever seen in the area on Boxing Day of 2015, the River Calder reached the highest ever recorded levels, flooding buildings never before flooded such as Burnley Road Academy in Mytholmroyd. The parish is on the route of the Calderdale Way, a circular walk of about 50 miles (80 km) around the hills and valleys of Calderdale.

April 5th
8670 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Lamesley

Population 8662

Lamesley is a village and civil parish in the Metropolitan Borough of Gateshead, Tyne and Wear, England. The population of the civil parish at the 2011 Census was 3,742. The village is on the southern outskirts of Gateshead, near to Birtley. The parish includes Kibblesworth, Lamesley village, Eighton Banks and Northside, Birtley which is predominantly private housing in neighbourhoods named The Hollys, Long Bank, Northdene and Crathie. A hilltop contemporary sculpture in the parish is the Angel of the North by Anthony Gormley on a minor hilltop which is lower than Low Fell in the parish.

April 4th
7753 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Woodbridge, Suffolk

Population 7749

Woodbridge is a town in Suffolk, East Anglia, England. It is in the East of England, about 8 miles (13 km) from the coast. It lies along the River Deben, with a population of about 11,000. The town is served by Woodbridge railway station on the Ipswich-Lowestoft East Suffolk Line and is located just a few miles from the wider Ipswich urban area. Woodbridge is twinned with Mussidan in France. Woodbridge is close to the most important Anglo-Saxon site in the United Kingdom, the Sutton Hoo burial ship. With 1100 years of recorded history, the town has retained a variety of historical architecture, and there are facilities for boating and riverside walks on the River Deben.

April 3rd
6846 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Fishtoft

Population 6835

Fishtoft is one of eighteen parishes which, together with Boston, form the Borough of Boston in the county of Lincolnshire, England. Local government has been arranged in this way since the reorganization of 1 April 1974, which resulted from the Local Government Act 1972. This parish forms an electoral ward in itself. Hitherto, the parish had formed part of Boston Rural District, in the Parts of Holland. Holland was one of the three divisions (formally known as parts) of the traditional county of Lincolnshire. Since the Local Government Act of 1888, Holland had been in most respects, a county in itself. The population of the civil parish at the 2011 census was 6,835. The origin of the place-name is from the Old Norse wordtoft meaning a building site or a curtilage. The addition of Fish in the 15th century may be a family name or may indicate a connection with fishing. The place-name appears as Toft in the Domesday Book of 1086 and as Fishtoft in 1416. The parish lies along the north-east side of The Haven and accommodates the Pilgrim Fathers Memorial at Scotia Creek. Fishtoft comprises three aspects - open countryside, the village of Fishtoft, and suburban overspill from Boston. The fields along Burton Croft Road are bounded by dykes which are a home to water voles (an endangered species in the United Kingdom - Fishtoft is one of only 181 sites where voles can still be found). Fishtoft has a school, an Anglican church, a shop (at Hawthron Tree Corner), and football and cricket clubs. The parish church is dedicated to the Saxon saint St Guthlac. The stonework contains traces of Norman work. There is a reference to the church in the Domesday Book. The 18th-century Reading Room, a red brick building just off Rectory Close, is now a private house - it was for many decades used as a centre of learning and education. The historic centre of the village was formerly an island in the tidal marshes - one a of series of islands around the coast of The Wash (each one marked by a medieval church). The parishes along the coast of the Wash had no eastern boundaries, and were continually expanding as new land was reclaimed from the tidal marshes. The marshes produced methane gas which spontaneously ignited to produce flares, giving rise to the belief that they were haunted by spirits and that the new land needed cleansing before it was safe to use. This may account for the veneration of St Guthlac at Fishtoft, the saint being renowned for driving out devils; a medieval statue of St Guthlac can be seen high up on the tower of the Fishtoft parish church, and formerly held the whip with which he cleansed the land of evil spirits. The statue of St Guthlac set into the west tower is of considerable interest. Niklaus Pevsner, in his volume on Lincolnshire (Buildings of England series) says that it is older than the fabric of the tower. It is possible that this is the original statue of the Guthlac cult, and would have been located inside the chancel. As well as the parish church of St Guthlac there was a priory "cell" (or small religious house) on the site of what is now Stoke Priory house on the corner of Gaysfield Road; some remains of the priory cell could be seen in the garden of the house until recently. There was also a small medieval wayside chapel on the western side of Church Green Road, the site indicated by a significant elevation of ground just north of the bungalow opposite The Grange. In addition, the ground at the corner of Clampgate Road and Burton Croft Road, in what is now an open field, formerly held a substantial medieval building, possibly a manor house, called Panels (or Panals) which included a chapel. The arrangement of religious buildings in medieval Fishtoft has given rise to speculation that the village may have been the centre of a cult of St Guthlac based on what is now the parish church, the monks of the priory cell helping to minister to the cult, and the wayside chapel in Church Green Road acting as a "slipper chapel" for pilgrims approaching the village along the permanent road from Boston. The feast of St Guthlac is held on 11 April. Some evidence of a Roman settlement has been found in the area. There was also an important Anglo-Saxon settlement in the area, confirmed by an excavation on what is now Saxon Gardens. At one stage there was a separate hamlet in the parish called Fenne, in the area that later contained the Ball House Inn, Rochford Tower and Hawthorn Tree Corner. This area formed almost a separate community in the 1950s with its own community hall. An important feature of the parish is the Hobhole Drain, constructed in the 19th century for land drainage purposes, which enters the River Witham near the Pilgrim Fathers Memorial. The water tower that formerly stood at the end of Cut End Road has recently been demolished - it was an exact copy of the water tower that still stands in Sutterton.

April 2nd
6006 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Staplehurst

Population 6003

Staplehurst /ˈsteɪpəlhɜːrst/ is a large village and civil parish, situated south of Maidstone in Kent, England. The name Staplehurst comes from the Saxon words staple (meaning post) and hurst (meaning wood or clearing in a forest). The village lies on the route of a Roman road, which is now incorporated into the course of the A229. There are approximately 2,600 households and 6,000 residents, a population that brings the village on par with some small towns. The population incudes the village of Hawkenbury. However, Staplehurst does not have the large facilities, like a supermarket although planning permission has been granted to build one,and leisure centre or the feel of a town. There are a number of local shops at the Parade, which lies roughly at the centre of the village, and one public house, the King's Head. It also has a small library and a newly built two-million-pound medical centre which contains numerous doctors and dentists. The building of the medical centre on the school field enabled the school to have a large sports hall built. During the last few years Hush Heath Estate has become renowned for its pink sparkling wine which has won awards.

April 1st
5200 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Edwinstowe

Population 5188

Edwinstowe is a large village and civil parish in the heart of Sherwood Forest, north Nottinghamshire, England, with associations to the Robin Hood and Maid Marian legends. The population of the civil parish at the 2011 Census was 5,188.

March 31st
4431 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Scone, Perth and Kinross

Population 4430

Scone (/ˈskuːn/) (Scottish Gaelic: Sgàin; Scots: Scuin) is a village in Perth and Kinross, Scotland. The medieval village of Scone, which grew up around the monastery and royal residence, was abandoned in the early 19th century when the residents were removed and a new palace was built on the site by the Earl of Mansfield. Hence the modern village of Scone, and the medieval village of Old Scone, can often be distinguished. Both sites lie in the historical province of Gowrie, as well as the old county of Perthshire. Old Scone was the historic capital of the Kingdom of Alba (Scotland). In the Middle Ages it was an important royal centre, used as a royal residence and as the coronation site of the kingdom's monarchs. Around the royal site grew the town of Perth and the Abbey of Scone.

March 30th
3771 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Macduff, Aberdeenshire

Population 3767

Macduff (Gaelic An Dùn) is a town in the Banff and Buchan area Aberdeenshire, Scotland. It is situated on Banff Bay and faces the town of Banff across the estuary of the River Deveron. Macduff is a former burgh and is now the only place in the United Kingdom where deep-water wooden fishing boats are still built.

March 29th
3180 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Upper Halliford

Population 3173

(For the locality of Lower Halliford or Halliford that is contiguous with Shepperton, see Shepperton.) Upper Halliford is a small linear village, part of the Shepperton post town, in the borough of Spelthorne, Surrey, England within the Metropolitan Green Belt. Its railway station is on the northern boundary and by part of Sunbury on Thames (which remains its Anglican parish) on a branch line from London; the M3 is just beyond. Upper Halliford is within the circle of the M25. Its closest settlements are Shepperton, Charlton and Walton on Thames. The village is partially on and partially by the A244 which alternates here between a dual carriageway and a single carriageway. All of the settled area is however on or beside a single carriageway as the corollary dual carriageway section takes through traffic around the south, village green part of the settlement. Part of this brief dual section has been harmonised to one lane, and Walton Bridge to the south along with almost all of the route is not dualled. No high rise buildings are in the village. Mid-rise flats are near to the village green and it has a conservation area.

March 28th
2673 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Nutfield, Surrey

Population 2673

Nutfield is a village and civil parish in the Tandridge district of Surrey. It lies in the Weald immediately south of the Greensand Ridge and has a railway station at South Nutfield which is one stop from Redhill, on the Redhill to Tonbridge Line. It includes a watersports park, Mercer's Park Country Park.

March 27th
2237 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Yalding

Population 2236

Yalding is a village and civil parish in the Borough of Maidstone in Kent, England. The village is situated 6 miles (9.7 km) south west of Maidstone at a point where the Rivers Teise and Beult join the River Medway. At the 2001 census, the parish, which includes the villages of Benover and Laddingford, had a population of 2,236. increasing to 2,418 at the 2011 Census. There are three bridges in the village; the Twyford Bridge (meaning twin ford, where there was originally a double crossing of the two rivers) is one of the finest medieval bridges in the south-east of England. Yalding was one of the principal shipment points on the River Medway for cannon, from villages of the Wealden iron industry. One iron master was John Browne from Horsmonden. The wharf was later used for transporting fruit from the many orchards in the area.

March 26th
1839 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Comrie

Population 1839

Comrie(/ˈkʌmri/; Gaelic: Cuimridh; Pictish: Aberlednock; Roman: Victoria) is an affluent village and parish in the southern highlands of Scotland, towards the western end of the Strathearn district of Perth and Kinross, seven miles (11 km) west of Crieff. Comrie is a historic conservation village, recognised for its outstanding beauty (for which it has received many awards) and history and is also situated in a National Scenic Area around the river Earn. In addition Comrie is a thriving local community with over 50 local groups covering all ages and many interests. Situated on the Highland Boundary Fault, the village experiences more earth tremors than anywhere else in Britain. The town is twinned with Carleton Place, Ontario, Canada.

March 25th
1478 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Wentworth, South Yorkshire

Population 1478

Wentworth is a village and civil parish in the Metropolitan Borough of Rotherham in South Yorkshire, England. In the 2001 Census the village had a population of 1,223, increasing to 1,478 at the 2011 Census.

March 24th
1175 dead in the UK from COVID-19

Maryburgh

Population 1175

Maryburgh (Scottish Gaelic: Baile Màiri) is a village Maryburgh (Scottish Gaelic: Baile Màiri) is a village in the Highland council area of Scotland, 2 miles (3 km) south of Dingwall. It is situated on the northern bank of the River Conon. The village of Conon Bridge is on the other side of the river. According to the 2011 census, 1,175 people live here.

March 23rd
938 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 22nd
752 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 21st
587 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 20th
457 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 19th
348 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 18th
274 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 17th
206 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 16th
154 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 15th
108 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 14th
76 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 13th
54 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 12th
38 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 11th
25 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 10th
17 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 9th
14 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 8th
9 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 7th
6 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 6th
6 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 5th
6 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 4th
3 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 3rd
3 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 2nd
1 dead in the UK from COVID-19
March 1st
0 dead in the UK from COVID-19
February 29th
0 dead in the UK from COVID-19
February 29th
0 dead in the UK from COVID-19

(not showing places with less than 1000 population)