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The University of Southampton
Archaeologies of Media and Technology Research group

Postgraduate Researchers in AMT

The Postgraduate Researchers in AMT are:

Stephen Cornford

Stephen Cornford

Stephen Cornford is a media artist and experimental musician who works by reconfiguring consumer electronics into expressive and reflective devices as a means of critiquing the ideologies they embody. He has had solo exhibitions in Tokyo, Berlin, Brighton, Bergen, Ljubljana & London and his work has been included in group exhibitions at the ZKM Center for Art & Media, Karlsruhe; ICC, Tokyo; Haus der Electronische Kunst, Basel; Sigma Foundation, Venice and at Biennalles in Lodz and Poznan. Stephen studied at The Slade School of Fine Art and Dartington College of Arts and is currently a PhD candidate affiliated with AMT.

His current research is concerned with image sensors: the now ubiquitous photosensitive semiconductors which transduce light into data in all digital cameras. This project seeks to reveal the structure of the digital image through direct material interaction with image sensors and to provide a new vocabulary of experimental digital video processes, which begins to redress the almost complete lack of in-camera experimentation with the digital medium. To this end he has exposed the sensors to infra-red laser pulses and hydrofluoric acid, appropriating laboratory processes from the optoelectronics industry in which this microelectronic component is developed. 

Abelardo Gil-Fournier

Abelardo Gil-Fournier

I am an artist and researcher interested in a media archaeological approach to the materiality of the image. My work can be described as a critical technical practice that unmakes the centrality of the human within the production and circulation of images.

My research departs from the double operation exerted by light on the world: it allows us to see, on the one hand, and it makes the living crust of the planet grow, on the other. These two parallel imprints give rise to the apparently separate realms of visual culture and agriculture, which might therefore be speculatively considered as parts of the same whole. 

This research project, in the fields of screen studies and the post-digital, stems then from this double bind and seeks in particular to highlight the transfers between the techniques of agriculture and land management with the technologies involved within the contemporary production of vision. As a practice-based research, it aims to ground the digital image and its screens to a surface of material relations that go beyond the human and where nature, media and culture meet.

Eda Sancakdar Onikinci

Eda Sancakdar Onikinci

Eda Sancakdar Onikinci is a researcher whose interests include 19th-century visual culture, histories of photography, visual representation of the face, and construction and visualisation of personal memory through archives. She has an MFA in Visual Communication Design from İstanbul Bilgi University where from 2011 to June 2017 she was also a lecturer in the Department of Film. Her teaching included theoretical and practical courses on the representation of the face and the body and the relationship between the spectator and the screen. Her current research investigates the overlooked history of photographic representation of Ottoman/Muslim women. Exploring both official and personal photographic archives, her research focuses on how photographic camera altered the definition of the “feminine”, by rendering female face (in)visible through discursive photographic practices.

 

Yiğit Soncul

Yiğit Soncul 

Yiğit Soncul is a PhD candidate and Part Time Lecturer in Global Media at WSA. His current project investigates the contemporary visual culture of the mask through a media ecological approach. Yigit's research interests include theories of visuality, materiality, technology, and network politics. He was a visiting fellow at the Department of Media and Communications of the University of Sydney in Spring 2016. His work appeared in journals including Theory, Culture & Society and Between.

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