The University of Southampton
Biological Sciences
Phone:
(023) 8059 3205
Email:
C.W.Jackson@soton.ac.uk

Dr Chris Jackson BSc, PhD

Associate Dean (Education). Faculty of Natural and Environmental Sciences, Associate Professor in Ecology and Evolution within Biological Sciences at the University of Southampton,Principal Investigator (Behaviour & pest control)

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Dr Chris Jackson is Associate Professor in Ecology and Evolution within Biological Sciences at the University of Southampton.

Career history

2010-present: Associate Dean (Education). University of Southampton, UK.
2008-2010: Deputy Head of Biosciences (Education). University of Southampton, UK.
2000-2008: Chair of the Honours School of Biology. University of Southampton, UK.
1987-present: Lecturer. University of Southampton, UK.
1985-1987: Temporary lectureship. University of Southampton, UK.

Academic qualifications

1980-1984: PhD Fungal/insect interactions. University of London, UK.
1977-1980: BSc Agricultural Botany. U.C.N.W., Bangor, Wales.

Research

Publications

Teaching

Contact

Research interests

My present research interests revolve around insects and fungi in the areas of ecology, evolution, behaviour and pest control.

Fungi for the microbial control of insect pests. Entomopathogenic fungi naturally pathogenic to insects can be used as biological control agents for invertebrate pests. We are exploring pathogenicity and specificity factors (biochemical/ physical/behavioural/ecological), and using this information to develop formulation and application strategies. The effect of microbial control agents on non-target invertebrates is also an important part of this work. In relation to this we are investigating how insects protect themselves from microbial pathogens, in particular antimicrobial compounds found in ant glands

Insect - fungal symbiosis. A number of important insect pests have a symbiotic fungal association. We are concentrating on the Leaf-cutting ants, which culture their unique symbiotic fungus and exclude contamination by alien microbes. How do they do this? What are the ecological and evolutionary benefits of the association to the fungus and its invertebrate partner.

The role of electrostatics in entomology. This relatively new venture has already yielded new and interesting data. with implications for insect behaviour and pest control.

Research group

Environmental Biosciences

Research project(s)

Tsetse fly control

Tsetse fly are responsible for transmitting a variety of Trypanosoma protozoal parasites that cause sickness in humans and cattle.

Control of fruitflies in Malaysian fruit crops

Sulaiman Zulkifly (sponsored by MARDI), is looking at the formulation of naturally occurring entomopathogenic fungi that have the potential to infect and kill fruitfly pests, as an alternative control strategy.

Evolutionary aspects of ant-fungus interactions in leaf-cutting ants

There have been a number of researchers looking at Leaf-cutting ants. Projects have ranged from studying the ecological and evolutionary role of the symbiotic fungus in manipulating ant foraging behaviour to the potential of using entomopathogenic fungi for controlling this pest.

Role of electrostatics in entomology

we have established that insects walking on dielectric surfaces accumulate electrostatic charges and have developed a model to explain the relationship between insect movement and charge accumulation for a variety of surfaces.

Effects of electric fields on animal behaviour

Animals show species-specific behavioural responses to electrical fields that are dependent upon the type of electric field and species involved

Reintroducing the sand lizard Lacerta agilis to heathland sites: individual differences, habitat suitability and the optimisation of post-release monitoring

Articles

Module coordinator

BIOL1001 Experimental and Field Ecology
BIOL1004 Patterns of Life and their Evolution
BIOL1003 Ecology and Evolution
BIOL1005 Cellular and Genetic Mechanisms
BIOL1006 Cell Biology & Genetics
BIOL1020 Bioanalysis
BIOL2008 Quantitative methods
BIOL2038 Microbiology - From the Natural Environment to Disease
BIOL2041 New Forest field course
BIOL3009 Applied Ecology
BIOL3034/61 In depth research project (lab/field)
BIOL6054 Techniques & theory of field biology
BIOL6069 Advanced research project (field)

Other teaching-related responsibilities

Faculty Associate Dean (Education & student experience)

Dr Chris Jackson
Biological Sciences
Faculty of Natural & Environmental Sciences
Life Sciences Building 85
University of Southampton
Highfield Campus
Southampton
SO17 1BJ

Room Number:85/6041

Telephone:(023) 8059 3205
Email:C.W.Jackson@soton.ac.uk

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