The University of Southampton
Biological Sciences
Phone:
(023) 8120 6826
Email:
N.R.Smyth@soton.ac.uk

Dr Neil Smyth BVSc, PhD

Reader in Development and Cell Biology, Principal Investigator (Extracellular matrix)

Dr Neil Smyth's photo
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Dr Neil Smyth is Reader in Development and Cell Biology within Biological Sciences at the University of Southampton.

Career History

2009-present: Reader in Development and Cell Biology. University of Southampton, UK.
2007-2009: Lecturer in Development and Cell Biology. University of Southampton, UK.
1997-2007: Lecturer in Biochemistry. University of Cologne, Germany.
1993-1997: Research Fellow. Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology, Martinsried, Germany.

Academic Qualifications

1993: PhD. University of Liverpool, UK.
1988: BSc. University of Liverpool, UK.

Research

Publications

Contact

Research interests

My research has focused upon the structure and function of the extracellular matrix, in particular the actions and importance of a specialised matrix, the basement membrane. Basement membranes are crucial in development and have been shown highly significant in many developmental processes, I have studied the roles of its constituent proteins, their receptors and modulator proteins. With an emphasis on structure-function relationships I have used in vivo and in vitro genetic approaches to determine protein function, following initial biochemical findings and using biochemical, biophysical, cell-biological and developmental biological assays I try to determine the in vivo significance of the basement membrane and its constituent proteins in physiological and pathological situations.

More recently I have studied the developmental and pathological roles of transglutaminases, crosslinking enzymes which have been shown to play a role in the stabilisation of extracellular matrices.

1. The roles of the basement membrane in development
2. Transglutaminases role in the formation of biological barriers

Research group

Developmental Biology

Affiliate research groups

Neuroscience, Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, Microbiology

Research project(s)

Physiological function of the GTG/GPHRs, a highly conserved family of eukaryotic membrane proteins

Is there a conserved function for the GTG/GPHR family of membrane proteins?

Maternal mechanisms induced by diet regulating embryo developmental plasticity affecting life-long health

Discovering the maternal mechanisms induced by diet which act through embryo developmental plasticity to alter later health.

Linking perturbed maternal environment during periconceptional development, due to diabetes, obesity or assisted reproductive technologies, and altered health during ageing

Mechanisms by which assisted conception treatments may affect embryo development and health into adulthood.

EpiHealthNet: Environment during periconceptional development, due to diabetes, obesity or assisted reproductive technologies, and altered health during ageing

Effects of assisted conception treatments on embryo development and health into adulthood.

Articles

Dr Neil Smyth
Biological Sciences
Faculty of Natural & Environmental Sciences
Life Sciences Building 85
University of Southampton
Highfield Campus
Southampton
SO17 1BJ

Room Number:SGH/LD62B

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