Skip to main navigationSkip to main content
The University of Southampton
Engineering

Research project: Self-tuning control systems of decentralised velocity feedback - Dormant - Dormant

Currently Active: 
No

The active control of vibration on large structures requires multiple actuators and sensors. The complexity of such a control system scales linearly with the number of actuators and sensors if these are arranged in collocated pairs and controlled using only local, decentralised, feedback. Although the use of such a modular approach to active control has several attractions, to provide good performance they must be able to self-tune their feedback gain to adapt to the environment they find themselves in.

Project Overview

The active control of vibration on large structures requires multiple actuators and sensors. The complexity of such a control system scales linearly with the number of actuators and sensors if these are arranged in collocated pairs and controlled using only local, decentralised, feedback. Although the use of such a modular approach to active control has several attractions, to provide good performance they must be able to self-tune their feedback gain to adapt to the environment they find themselves in. The presentation is focused on the realisation of an active vibration control system using multiple local velocity feedback control loops. A simple approach is proposed to automatically tune the feedback gains in such a way that the frequency-averaged response to broadband random excitation is reduced. The self-tuning of each control feedback loop is based on the maximisation of their power absorbed estimated from the velocity measured signal. The maximisation of power absorbed, which requires only local measurements, provides a good approximation to the minimisation of the overall kinetic energy of a structure, corresponding to its global response. The method is initially demonstrated assuming ideal force actuators, and then experimentally implemented on a clamped aluminium panel. Preliminary experimental results on the stability and performance of the control system are presented.

Share this research project Share this on Facebook Share this on Google+ Share this on Twitter Share this on Weibo

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×