Skip to main navigationSkip to main content
The University of Southampton
EnglishPart of Humanities

Are there 'male' and 'female' novels'?

Published: 10 January 2011
Chawton House Library

Professor Barbara Benedict of Trinity College, Connecticut, USA, explored the fictions about fiction and gender during the late 18th century and the Regency at a talk at Chawton House Library.

According to Jane Austen’s hero in Northanger Abbey, "The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid.” Yet from 1770 to the early 19th century, women were warned, scolded and ridiculed for being addicted to fictions purveying steamy sentiment,

Professor Barbara Benedict of Trinity College, Connecticut, USA, explored the fictions about fiction and gender during the late 18th century and the Regency at a talk at Chawton House Library. She asked whether novels 'by a lady' differ from those which are not, and how the gender of a reader shapes the reception of novels from Sterne’s Tristram Shandy to Austen’s Pride and Prejudice.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×