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The University of Southampton
Geography and Environmental Science

Environmental Sensing Facility

Quick Links: Quest UAV U200     Terrestrial Laser Scanners    Total Station    Differential GPS    M9 River Surveyor    Edgetech, CHIRP subbottom profiler

Quest UAV U200

Technicians Tom Bishop, Peter Morgan, lecturer Gareth Roberts and Postgraduate Researcher Alex Clayton
Flight Crew UAV Challenger

The U200 is an auto piloted unmanned airborne system. It has a stabilised camera which will take aerial photographs to a 1cm resolution over a survey area of up to 100ha.

In addition to this fixed wing UAV we have a DJI quadcopter and octocopter.

 

Find out more about the QuestUAV 200

 

Terrestrial Laser Scanners

errestrial laser scanning creates accurate three-dimensional images of real-world objects. A laser scanner records millions of highly accurate, unique points by sweeping its laser beam over a surrounding scene or object. The scanner’s XYZ measurements are recorded, and displayed as a ‘point cloud’ which can be viewed, measured and navigated as a 3D model.

Geography and Environment has three Terrestrial Laser Scanners (Leica Scanstation 1, C10 and P20). The main purpose of the scanners is to build 3D representations of various environments for a multitude of applications, but also to detect micro-scale changes in environments over a given time period. Data collection is rapid and user-friendly, with the P20 able to record and store 1 million data points every second.

Terrestrial laser
Terrestrial laser
Terrestrial Laser Scanner
Terrestrial Laser Scanner

Total Station

A Total Station is an electronic surveying instrument, which combines the functionality of a theodolite and an electronic distance meter into a single package. This allows the user to undertake topographic surveys, such as river profiles, slope measurements, bank surveying, beach profiles and many other projects, to an extremely high degree of accuracy. The TCRP 1205+ is accurate to 1mm using a prism up to a range of 3km, and about 2mm when operating without a prism up to a range of 1km. Typically, a prism is attached to the top of a pole carried by the user, who would carry out the survey by operating the Total Station remotely. The Total Station can also be used in conjunction with the Laser Scanners to tie together the Laser Scanner data with other ground and survey measurements.

Portus Project, Ancient Rome
Portus Project, Ancient Rome
Total Station
Total Station
Arolla 3rd year option fieldcourse
Arolla 3rd year option fieldcourse

Differential GPS

Differential GPS
Differential GPS

Differential Global Positioning System (dGPS) is an enhancement to the more familiar GPS that provides improved location accuracy, from the 7-10 metre hand-held GPS accuracy, to sub-centimetre accuracy.

dGPS uses a base station fixed over a given point which continuously logs its position using available satellites, and a hand-held system then communicates with the base via a radio link, whilst also receiving signals from satellites. The software within the instrument can then process both signals and more accurately determine the user’s position on the Earth’s surface.

The department has two separate Leica GS09 dGPS units available to users; however these can be combined when dealing with extremely large sites to collect data more rapidly. dGPS can improve any project where standard GPS is present, by being able to much more confidently position features in a topographic survey. Researchers are currently using the dGPS units to detect change in river profiles in Pakistan, Cambodia and also track the migration of bed-load in the Severn Estuary.

The M9 River Surveyor

M9 River Surveyor
M9 River Surveyor

Photo source: Xylem

The River Surveyor M9 is a small Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) mounted on a Hydroboard with an inbuilt GPS antenna. ADCP's are used to measure 3D water velocity and are most commonly used to discretise velocity across a river to enable accurate estimates of discharge. The M9 ADCP is a multiband arrangement capable of measuring velocities through the water column at depths from 0.06 to 40m (and at spatial resolutions from 0.02m) and is used in a range of research which seeks to characterise flow fields near banks, around in-channel structures (e.g. debris dams) and where complex flow fields exist. 

Edgetech, CHIRP subbottom profiler

This field instrument is used for bathymetric and sub-bottom surveys. The instrument sends and detects the return of sound waves from the bed and sub bottom sediments.

Find out more about the Bathy-2010PC CHIRP Sub-Bottom Profiler

Ground Penetrating Radar

Sensors and Software PLUS EKKO Pro with 200, 100, 50 MHZ antennae and smart cart. This has applications including geotechnical surveys and glacier depth sounding

 

ESDd Newsletter January 2014
ESDd Newsletter January 2014

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