The University of Southampton
Humanities

About our research impact

Portus Project

Archaeology: The Portus Project

A University of Southampton study of Portus, the maritime port of Imperial Rome, led by Professor Simon Keay, has had a significant influence on how the State authorities in Rome manage archaeological sites. Its findings show that commercial activity at the port was far greater than previously understood, enabling academics to reappraise the site’s significance and increase public awareness of it around the world. A three-phase programme of archaeological research, led by the University of Southampton, is the first sustained study of Portus, the port of Imperial Rome.

Its findings show that commercial activity at the port was far greater than previously understood, enabling academics to reappraise the site’s significance and increase public awareness of it around the world. A three-phase programme of archaeological research, led by the University of Southampton, is the first sustained study of Portus, the port of Imperial Rome.

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Mozart's Ghost

Investigating Mozarts Enduring Popularity

Research by Mark Everist, Professor of Music at the University of Southampton, examines 200 years’ worth of interpretation and reception of one of the world’s most famous composers, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.

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Music and the Holocaust by Dr Shirli Gilbert
Music and the Holocaust

Resistance and remembrance: the role of music in the Holocaust

Research by the University of Southampton has shown the vital role music played in documenting the experiences and horrors suffered by prisoners held in concentration camps across Europe in the Second World War.

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 The Soldier in Later Medieval England, and the Battle of Agincourt (1415)
Agincourt. A New History

The Soldier in Later Medieval England, and the Battle of Agincourt (1415)

Henry V’s victory of 1415, Agincourt, is one of the most famous battles of all time. It occupies a special place in English consciousness. Several misconceptions have arisen from post-medieval re-writings of the event, including the most famous cultural depiction of the battle, Shakespeare’s 1599 play Henry V. Specifically, it has been widely accepted that the English army was severely outnumbered by the French. It has also been commonly believed that ‘professional’ soldiery did not emerge until the early modern period.

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