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The University of Southampton
Institute for Life Sciences

Bioengineering Seminar Series Event

Time:
15:00 - 16:00
Date:
11 May 2012
Venue:
Room 2207, Life Sciences Building (85)

For more information regarding this event, please telephone Nick Evans on +44 (0)23 80777222 Ext. 3293 or email n.d.evans@soton.ac.uk .

Event details

O2 regulating bioactive glasses: breathing new life into tissue engineering, Dr Gavin Jell, University College London

The cellular response to low O2 pressure (hypoxia) plays an important role in tissue development and regeneration. Hypoxia, via the HIF (hypoxia inducing factor) pathway, activates numerous genes required for tissue regeneration (Fig. 1), including a plethora of pro-angiogenic genes required for the restoration of O2 pressure via new blood vessel growth. Materials that regulate the cellular hypoxia pathway in normoxia could therefore promote the formation of a functional vasculature and activate a number of other regenerative pathways important for tissue engineering.

Melt derived bioactive glasses (BGs) were developed with the known hypoxia mimetic cobalt incorporated into the glass network. When submerged in media, cobalt ions were released from glass particles in a controlled manner at physiological active concentrations. Dissolution products from the hypoxia BGs stabilised HIF-1α expression (nuclear extraction) and activated hypoxia-related regenerative responses in a variety of cell lines (endothelial, osteoblast, fibroblast, MSCs and monocyte). The hypoxia BGs upregulated the expression of pro-angiogenic factors (VEGF, FGF and VEGF-C), increased cell migration, enhanced cell survival and promoted anti-microbial activity (monocyte recruitment and phagocytic activity).

Hypoxia BGs were thereby shown to regulate the HIF pathway and promote a number of cellular responses favourable for tissue regeneration. Applications for these HIF regulating materials in osteochondral tissue engineering, controlling stem cell fate and promoting wound healing will be discussed.

Speaker information

Dr Gavin Jell,University College London, UCL Teaching Fellow

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