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Institute for Life SciencesOur research

Computational Science & Engineering

Computational Science and Engineering plays a key role in underpinning IfLS application research through the research, development and application of tools, technologies and platforms to perform large scale high performance computing calculations and handle large data sets.

We draw together excellence in interdisciplinary science and engineering simulation and data handling methods, coupled to applications across all areas of interdisciplinary life sciences. Our strength lies in this sophisticated mix of computational methods, coupled to life sciences applications.

A particular focus for our activities over the next few years is exploiting new computational tools, technologies and platforms to deliver impact in health care, environmental systems, and life systems.

Image supplied by Prof Neil Bressloff
TAVI Devices

One method is the use of High Performance Computing to simulate the deployment of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) devices into models of patient specific aortic roots. These methods will improve the outcome of TAVI procedures for an increasing population of patients.

 

Related Staff Member

The Institute funds a cohort of interdisciplinary PhD studentships each year. Currently, postgraduate students in this field include:

Simone Perrazzolo

Simone Perazzolo

Computational Modelling of Fatty Acid Transport in the Human Placenta

Key Publications

Image supplied by Prof Neil Bressloff
TAVI Devices

Title: Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Devices

Lead: Prof Neil Bressloff

We are using High Performance Computing to simulate the deployment of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) devices into models of patient specific aortic roots. These methods will improve the outcome of TAVI procedures for an increasing population of patients.

When blood is pumped from the heart it enters the aorta through the aortic valve comprising three very thin leaflets that open and close with each heartbeat. Unfortunately, the leaflets can become thickened and stiffer leading to malfunction and a range of morbidities. Traditionally, open heart surgery has been used to replace the damaged valve but, more recently, a less invasive procedure has been developed to deliver a replacement valve percutaneously on a catheter. High performance computational engineering simulations (that take nearly a week to run on the University supercomputer Iridis4) are being used to simulate the deployment of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) devices into models of patient specific aortic roots. Ultimately, it is hoped to use these methods to improve the outcome of TAVI procedures for an increasing population of patients.

 

 

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