Skip to main navigationSkip to main content
The University of Southampton
Interdisciplinary Research Excellence

Some random walks in space weather Event

Time:
14:00 - 15:00
Date:
12 November 2014
Venue:
Building 53, Room 4025a, Highfield Campus, University of Southampton

For more information regarding this event, please email Brendan Neville at bjn1c13@ecs.soton.ac.uk .

Event details

Part of the Complexity Seminar Series 2014-2015.

Abstract

Space weather - the natural variability of near-Earth space - is a hazard to modern society, with the potential to affect satellite services and electricity supply. It is the fourth highest natural hazard risk on the Government's National Risk Register, alongside heatwaves and low temperatures. Arguably the greatest source of uncertainty is the substorm - an earthquake-like disruption of near-Earth space that eludes deterministic prediction. In this talk, I will show how substorm occurrence may be understood as a random walk towards an absorbing barrier, similar to the Gerstein-Mandelbrot model of neuron firing in the brain. I will discuss the limits of prediction and similarities to the space weather of Jupiter and Saturn.

All CS4 talks are free and refreshments will be provided from 3pm.

No registration is required. For videos of previous talks and details of future talks please visit: http://cs4southampton.wordpress.com

CS4 is the seminar series for the Institute for Complex Systems Simulation which brings together world-class simulation modelling research activities from across the University of Southampton and hosts Southampton's Doctoral Training Centre (DTC) in Complex Systems Simulation: http://www.icss.soton.ac.uk

* Please note that the start time of this is 2pm. All other CS4 seminars will continue to start at 4pm.

Speaker information

Mervyn Freeman,British Antarctic Survey,British Antarctic Survey (BAS) is a component of the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC). Based in Cambridge, United Kingdom, it has, for over 60 years, undertaken the majority of Britain's scientific research on and around the Antarctic continent. It now shares that continent with scientists from over thirty countries.

Privacy Settings