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The University of Southampton
Southampton Law SchoolPostgraduate study

Ms Aygun Mammadzada PhD Candidate (University of Southampton), LLM in International Business Law (University of Southampton), LLB (Baku State University)

PhD Researcher in Law

Ms Aygun Mammadzada's photo

Ms Aygun Mammadzada is a PhD researcher within Southampton Law School at the University of Southampton. Aygun’s research primarily focusses on private international law and dispute resolution including both litigation and arbitration, as well as commercial conflicts of laws.

She studied an undergraduate degree in Law at Baku State University under the scholarship of the Government of Azerbaijan Republic and her thesis was on “The rights of the foreigners in civil procedure”. She graduated with distinction and was awarded with the “High Honor’s Diploma” and “the best graduate in Law” title in 2013. Following her internships in some state affiliates during her studies, she began to work in several law firms before getting a Government Scholarship to pursue master’s education. Subsequently, Aygun obtained a Masters in International Business law from the University of Southampton in 2015. Her master’s thesis was on “Anti-suit injunctions and arbitration after Gazprom”. Afterwards, she has had teaching experience in different modules relevant to her research interests and also worked as a trainer.

In 2015, she was employed by the Ministry of Education of Azerbaijan as a lawyer and also began teaching as a part-time lecturer-tutor at Baku State University. In 2016, she was qualified as a civil servant. Appointed as the International Project Officer of the Legal Department of the Ministry of Education of Azerbaijan she represented the government in several international legal negotiations and professional occasions, such as the Twinning Project of the European Commission on Transposition, implementation and enforcement of the EU legislation on development of higher education. Furthermore, she became a member of the Expert Commission for provision of licences to the educational institutions, officer on legal issues related to the invalidated extracurricular educational establishments and transfer issues related to the invalidated educational institutions.

In 2017, she was awarded a Law School Scholarship by the Faculty of Business, Law and Art at the University of Southampton for pursuing her PhD on “Provision of Party Autonomy by The Hague Convention on Choice of Court Agreements 2005”. She is actively participating in international conferences and has delivered presentations subsequent to some publications hereof.

Besides her research, she is a member of the Centre for Private and Commercial Law (CPCL), student representative at the Faculty Systems’ Board at the University of Southampton. She has also been working as a member of the Organizing Committee of the Doctoral Research Conference at the University of Southampton.

Recently, she has been appointed an Editor-in-chief of Southampton Student Law Review and Co-ordinator for the School of Law Pro Bono Clinics. Furthermore, she was awarded with the scholarship of Max Planck Institute Luxembourg for International, European and Regulatory Procedural law and research allowance of the Director of the Graduate School Southampton.

Member

Centre for Private and Commercial Law (CPCL)

Research interests

International and European private international law,
International and European dispute resolution,
Litigation and arbitration,
Commercial conflicts of laws.

PhD Research

Provision of party autonomy by the Hague Convention 2005 on Choice of Court Agreements.

The primary objective of the research is to examine the effectiveness of the provision of party autonomy by the Hague Convention 2005 on Choice of Court Agreements. In light of this major scheme, it will speculate upon the basic principles of the Convention which demonstrate great respect to the parties’ will, also determining limitations hereof. In this regard, the project will associate similar perspectives shared by the Brussels Recast Regulation and New York Convention 1958 on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards. Having critically analysed the provisions of the HCCA relevant to the party autonomy principle and relationship with other relevant instruments in this vein, the study will attempt to depict its possible benefits for the parties post-Brexit and suggest some solutions towards more effective operation and ratification status.

Supervisors:

Professor Yvonne Baatz,
Dr Filip Saranovic,
Professor Paul Todd.

A postgraduate student representative at the Faculty Systems’ Board at the University of Southampton,
A member of the Organizing Committee of the Doctoral Research Conference at the University of Southampton.

Ms Aygun Mammadzada
Southampton Law School, Building 4 University of Southampton Highfield Southampton SO17 1BJ UK
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