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The University of Southampton
Institute for Life Sciences

Southampton Neuroscience Group Conference Event

Southampton Neuroscience Group
Time:
09:00 - 16:00
Date:
19 September 2019
Venue:
Lecture Theatre 1, South Academic Block, Southampton General Hospital

For more information regarding this event, please email Dr Ian Galea at I.Galea@soton.ac.uk .

Event details

This year’s SoNG (Southampton Neuroscience Group) conference will be held on the 19th September 2019, at Southampton General Hospital.

The SoNG conference is the most significant annual neuroscience event in the Wessex region. Please register for the meeting using the link: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-neuroscience-of-lifelong-illness-tickets-62801908198

This year the topic will be “The neuroscience of lifelong illness”, so the emphasis will be on long-term chronic neurological conditions. The meeting will reflect the breadth and multidisciplinarity of neuroscience and the complexity of lifelong conditions, from care provision to fundamental understanding of molecular mechanisms. The programme (see below or attached) is designed with a diverse audience in mind, from the basic sciences and clinical areas within the neuroscience community in Southampton and the surrounding region. The guest speaker will be Professor Jeremy Chataway who will deliver a keynote talk on progressive multiple sclerosis.

The programme is attached. Continuing professional development (CPD) points have been awarded from the main colleges (Royal College of Physicians - 5 points, Royal College of Surgeons – 4.5 points, The Society of British Neurological Surgeons – 4.5 points).

There will be an opportunity for early career researchers to present their data in oral or poster sessions. Poster sessions will be electronic, consisting of one slide per presenter, with a five minute time slot for each presenter. Abstract deadline for early career researchers is Thursday 29th August, please email M.R.Andrews@soton.ac.uk  for the submission template.

PROGRAMME

0905 - 0915 Opening (Professor Diana Eccles)

Morning session (Chair: Dr Tracey Newman)

0915 – 1000 Brain haemorrhage

0915 – 0930: Clinical aspects of subarachnoid haemorrhage: Mr Diederik Bulters

0930 – 0945: Haemoglobin toxicity in the brain and its therapeutic potential: Dr Patrick Garland

0945 – 0950: Early career researcher presentation

0950 – 1000: Questions

1000 – 1045 Ageing and the brain

1000 – 1015: The neurovascular pathology of aging: Professor Roxana Carare

1015 – 1030: Global ageing and long-term care: Professor Athina Vlachantoni

1030 – 1035: Early career researcher presentation

1035 – 1045: Questions

1045 – 1115 Coffee

 

Mid-morning session (Chair: Professor Lindy Holden-Dye)

1115 – 1200 Dementia

1115 – 1130: Systemic inflammation and Alzheimer's disease: Professor Clive Holmes

1130 – 1145: Cell biology of tauopathy: Dr Katrin Deinhardt

1145 – 1050: Early career researcher presentation

1150 – 1200: Questions

1200 – 1245 Parkinson’s disease

1200 – 1215: Mitochondrial quality control and Parkinson’s: Dr David Tumbarello

1215 – 1230: Staying active with Parkinson’s: Dr Dorit Kunkel

1230 – 1235: Early career researcher presentation

1235 – 1245: Questions

1245 – 1330 Lunch & posters

 

Early afternoon session (Chairs: Dr Ian Galea / Professor Matt Garner)

1330 – 1415 Multiple sclerosis

Guest speaker: Professor Jeremy Chataway: Progressive Multiple Sclerosis: trials and tribulations

1415 – 1500 Digital health technology

1415 – 1430: Should clinicians be replaced by computers? Dr Helen Cullington

1430 – 1445: Information technology and clinical excellence: Dr Christopher Kipps

1445 – 1450: Early career researcher presentation

1450 – 1500: Questions

1500 – 1530 Coffee & posters

 

Late afternoon session (Chairs: Professor Peter Smith / Dr Ian Galea)

1530 – 1540 IDeAC: Dr Christopher Kipps and Professor Roxana Carare

1540 – 1555 Best Early Career Researcher Prize and Close

 

 

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