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The University of Southampton
Medicine

Dr Jane Warner BSc, PhD

Senior Lecturer in Pharmacology

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Dr Jane Warner is Senior Lecturer in Pharmacology within Medicine at the University of Southampton.

After finishing her PhD on the anti-inflammatory effects of bee venom peptides at UCL Dr Warner undertook a post-doctoral fellowship in the Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore Maryland. She worked with Dr Larry Lichtenstein and Dr Don MacGlashan on IgE dependent signaling in human basophils and isolated mast cells from a range of human tissues characterizing their mediator release. Returning to the UK in 1990 she established a research group first in the School of Biological Sciences and more recently in the School of Medicine. Work has revolved around the role of small airways and surrounding parenchyma in asthma and COPD using a range of ex vivo techniques. She has extensive expertise in working with human lung tissue explants and characterizing the effects of different drugs on the inflammatory response. She has also isolated a range of cells from human lung including mast cells, macrophages, fibroblasts and T cells.

Qualifications

B.Sc Chemistry, University College, London (1980)
PhD Chemistry, University College, London (1983)

Appointments held

Post-doctoral fellow, Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (1983-1986)

Lecturer in Medicine, Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (1986-1987)

Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore Maryland (1987-1990)

Lecturer in Pharmacology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Southampton (1990-1995)

Senior Lecturer in Pharmacology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Southampton (1995-2006)

Research interests

Chronic lung diseases such as asthma, COPD and pulmonary fibrosis are a major cause of mortality and morbidity in the Western world and their incidence is still increasing. Understanding the fundamental changes that underpin these conditions may lead to the development of new drugs or approaches to treating these diseases. Typically research has focused on the large airways but our work highlights the role of the small airways and surrounding tissue in both asthma and COPD. Current projects include:-

(a) Novel inflammatory mechanisms in COPD. Collaboration with Chris Pickared. This study is looking at the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of COPD and the potential development of autoimmune responses.

(b) Role of peptides of the renin angiotensin system in the airways. Collaboration with Lynn Andrews and Chris Torrens (HDH) The identification of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) in 2000 suggests a wide range of peptides may be generated in the airways and influence inflammatory pathways. This project will examine the distribution of ACE and ACE2 and the distinctions between the upper and lower airways.

(c) Modulators of airway and vascular smooth muscle contraction Collaboration with ChrisTorrens and Tony Sampson. This project aims to characterize some of the orphan GPCR found on smooth muscle cells in the airways and vasculature looking to identify the expression of the receptors by immunohistochemistry and PCR and characterize their functional responses. Areas of interest include the pro and anti-inflammatory lipids and novel approaches to dilating the airways and vasculature.

(d) Novel mechanisms for the regulation of human lung fibroblasts. Collaboration with Lynn Andrews and Tony Sampson. This project aims to identify novel receptors on human lung fibroblasts from the proximal and distal airways and develop new strategies to target fibrosis in the airways.

Department(s)

Clinical and Experimental Sciences

Affiliate Department(s)

Infection and Immunity Research group

Postgraduate student supervision

1995 Sandra Lavens PhD
1996 Lynette Thomas PhD
1997 Kirsten Goldring PhD
1998 Joanne
1999 Kirsty Rich PhD
2001 Alex Furr PhD
2001 Paul Mercer PhD
2004 Michel Erlewyn-Lajeunesse DM
2007 Tillie-Louise Hackett PhD
2010 Rebecca Holloway PhD
2010 Kelly Lowings PhD
2011 Gregory Rankin PhD

Current

Sarah Williams PhD
Mel Jannaway PhD

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Articles

Conference

BM4 & 5
Member, Pharmacology teaching team. Deliver lectures, small group teaching and practicals in years 1 and 2 that introduce the essentials of pharmacology to the medical students.
Give lectures on numeracy and basic prescribing skills to year 1 students
Academic lead for Immunology and deliver introductory immunology lectures to year 1
Academic lead for Practical prescribing in year 5

BMedSc.
Supervises BMedSc projects.

B.Sc. Biomedical Science
Module co-ordinator for BIOL 3026 Pathophysiology of the Lung. Lectures on Allergy and Asthma, BIOL3026. Lectures on Histamine and 5-HT for BIOL 2016 Introduction to Pharmacology. Supervise final year research projects.

Foundation tutor

Personal tutor

Dr Jane Warner
Phone: (023) 8120 4731 Email:jawarner@southampton.ac.uk

Room Number: SGH//MP825

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