The University of Southampton
Medicine

Research project: FAME Fatigue: acute Fatigue Assessment and Management in Everyday practice

Currently Active: 
Yes

This research aims, in the proposed future NIHR Programme grant, to help patients manage short-term (acute) fatigue – one of the most intrusive but often hidden symptoms – and to better understand and predict which patients with acute fatigue go on to develop Chronic Fatigue (lasting 6 months or more) or Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME)

Project Overview

Summary

This research aims, in the proposed future NIHR Programme grant, to help patients manage short-term (acute) fatigue – one of the most intrusive but often hidden symptoms – and to better understand and predict which patients with acute fatigue go on to develop Chronic Fatigue (lasting 6 months or more) or Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME). We will also explore whether a web based intervention can help both acute fatigue and also prevent progression to chronic fatigue.

However, preliminary feasibility research is needed before full funding can be justified. This study will explore the assessment and recruitment of the different groups of fatigue presenting in primary care and explore the issues for patients, both where fatigue is presented as the main problem but also where fatigue is a major hidden symptom, and perform a feasibility study of the proposed patient cohort.

 

Principal aims:

The short term aim of this study is to establish the feasibility and likely inclusion criteria for an acute fatigue cohort in preparation for justifying a renewed full Programme grant application to PGfAR.

Our longer term aims in a future Programme are to achieve: 

1) A website to support self-management of acute fatigue in primary care. 

2) A cohort to develop and validate a clinical prediction rule to better predict which individuals will develop Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/ Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME). 

3) A contextual understanding of the key issues in achieving recovery from acute fatigue.

 

Sample size: 

We aim to recruit a minimum of 100 but preferably between 150-200 patients from 10 practices, over a 4 month period – October 2014 to January 2015.

 

Local Investigator: Prof Paul Little

Duration: 2014-2015

Funder: NIHR School for Primary Care Research

Contact: tet@soton.ac.uk

 

 

 

Related research groups

Primary Care & Population Sciences Academic Units

Staff

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