The University of Southampton
Medicine

Research project: Healthy Paths - Exploring primary care patients’ experience of an internet intervention ‘Healthy Paths’ for emotional distress

Currently Active: 
Yes

Computerised/Internet-based Cognitive Behavioural Therapy interventions (cCBT) have the potential to increase access to evidence-based psychological treatment for emotional distress in primary care.

Project Overview

Background
Computerised/Internet-based Cognitive Behavioural Therapy interventions (cCBT) have the potential to increase access to evidence-based psychological treatment for emotional distress in primary care. Despite evidence of effectiveness from systematic reviews, few trials are conducted with primary care patients. When therapeutic guidance is removed in primary care trials, cCBT interventions are often not more effective for depression/anxiety symptoms than usual care. There is little evidence of patient involvement in the development of existing cCBT programmes. This lack of involvement may have a detrimental impact on their use and effectiveness.  The aim of this study is to apply a systematic, primarily inductive, approach (the Person Based Approach) to the continued development of an internet intervention for emotional distress.

Aim
To apply a systematic, primarily inductive, approach (the Person Based Approach) to the continued development of an internet intervention for emotional distress. The intervention has been specifically developed for unguided use with primary care patients.

Design
Twenty-five primary care patients experiencing heightened distress will be recruited to use the intervention over a 4-week period. They will take part in in-depth qualitative interviews after 1 and 4 weeks with the intervention.

The interviews will explore use of the intervention, perceptions of usefulness/effectiveness of the suggested therapeutic approach, and perceived applicability to patients’ life circumstances. Our results will be used to modify the intervention, and inform the development of a randomised controlled trial. We expect our findings to have broad implications for the use of digital mental health interventions in primary care. Additionally, our findings will contribute to the understanding of how digital interventions are used to support effective emotion regulation in everyday contexts.


LOCAL INVESTIGATORS:
Dr Adam Geraghty, Prof Tony Kendrick, A. Prof Miriam Santer, Prof Paul Little, Prof Lucy Yardley and Prof Michael Moore

FUNDER: NIHR School for Primary Care Research (SPCR)

Duration: July 2016 – September 2017

Contact: Dr Adam Geraghty (A.W.Geraghty@soton.ac.uk)

 

Related research groups

Primary Care & Population Sciences Academic Units
Primary care Research group

Staff

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