The University of Southampton
News

New genes for lung disease discovered

Published: 
13 December 2009

Scientists at the University of Southampton and the MRC Epidemiology Resource Centre are part of a consortium that has discovered five genetic variants which are associated with the health of the human lung. The research by an international team of 96 scientists from 63 centres in Europe and Australia sheds new light on the molecular basis of lung diseases.

The new findings provide hope for better treatment for lung diseases like Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and asthma. In the past it has been difficult to develop new treatments because the molecular pathways that affect the health of the lung are not completely understood. It’s hoped the new pathways discovered could in the future be targeted by drugs.

The ground-breaking research involved a genetic study of 2.5 million sites across the human genome involving samples from 20,000 people across the world.

The research, part-funded by the Medical Research Council (MRC), the Arthritis Research Campaign, and the Asthma, Allergy and Inflammation Research Charity (AAIR) , represents a significant advance because it is the first time that these five common genetic variations have been definitely linked with lung function.

Professor Cyrus Cooper, Director of the MRC Epidemiology Resource Centre, says: “I am delighted that the team has been able to contribute towards this worldwide effort to identify genetic markers of respiratory disease."

Dr John Holloway, Reader in Genetics at the University of Southampton’s School of Medicine, says: “The results of this huge collaborative study give us a fascinating insight into the potential causes of chronic respiratory disease."

The scientists of the SpiroMeta consortium compared genetic variants at each of 2.5 million sites across the human genome in over 20,000 individuals of European ancestry with their lung function measures. In five different locations in the human genome, genetic variants resulted in alterations in lung function. Research showed that these were real findings by checking the effects of the same variants in over 33,000 additional individuals. They also compared their results to those of a second consortium, CHARGE, which has published a paper in the same issue of the journal.

The team emphasise that they do not expect these findings to lead to immediately to genetic tests to predict who will develop lung disease. What is more important, they say, is that the findings will help understand the underlying causes of lung diseases and thus may indicate new ways of treating the condition.

The consortium was led by scientists from the Universities of Leicester and Nottingham.

 

Notes for editors

  • Lung function is commonly expressed using two measures recorded using a simple device called a spirometer. These measures are termed the FEV1 (or forced expiratory volume in 1 second) which is the volume of air that can be breathed out in 1 second, and the FVC (forced vital capacity) which is the total volume of air that can be breathed out. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which encompasses chronic bronchitis and emphysema, narrowing of the airways causes a disproportionate reduction in FEV1. Cough, phlegm and shortness of breath are common symptoms of COPD. The simplest way to diagnose COPD is through spirometry, which is usually available in general practitioners’ surgeries. Although there is no cure for COPD, stopping smoking and treatments can improve symptoms and reduce the impact of COPD on exercise and daily activities. Drug treatments include bronchodilators and, for exacerbations, may include short-term steroids. Patients with COPD are more susceptible to serious lung infections, so flu vaccination each winter is important.

    The genetic determinants of COPD can be studied by investigating the genetic variants that affect the risk of developing COPD itself or by studying lung function itself, on which the diagnosis of COPD is based. Reduced lung function may also occur in patients with other airway diseases such as asthma.

    Further research will be needed to study in detail the molecular alterations in the lung that result from the genetic variants identified, and to investigate whether these might be targeted by drugs. At this time there is no case for testing for common genetic variants that might predispose to COPD.

  • Articles that may also interest you

    We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

    ×