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The University of Southampton
The Parkes Institute

Parkes Lecture 2020 Event

James Parkes
Time:
18:00
Date:
3 March 2020
Venue:
Avenue Campus, University of Southampton Southampton SO17 1BF

For more information regarding this event, please email Parkes Institute at parkes@southampton.ac.uk .

Event details

Part of an annual series of lectures organise by the Parkes Institute.

Michael Laurence Miller
Michael Laurence Miller

"Judapest": Austria-Hungary and its Jews at the Fin-de-Siècle

Budapest is sometimes called the “Paris of the East,” but in the 1890s, it acquired a new, less flattering nickname: “Judapest.” Karl Lueger, the antisemitic mayor of Vienna – who hated Hungarians more than he hated Jews – is often credited with coining this derogatory nickname for a city that he thought had become more "Jewish" than "Hungarian."  Budapest was Europe's fastest-growing city at the time, with a flurry of cultural and commercial activity that fascinated -- and sometimes appalled -- contemporary residents and visitors. This talk will examine the image of Budapest in the decades before and after the First World War, exploring the ways in which Hungary's capital city was imagined by Jews and non-Jews alike as a quintessentially Jewish metropolis.

RSVP

Please note this is a free event however you will need to book a place via Eventbrite to attend this lecture, a link will appear here in due course.

Speaker information

Michael L Miller,Central European University in Budapest,Michael L. Miller is Associate Professor in the Nationalism Studies Program at Central European University in Budapest, Hungary, and co-founder of the university's Jewish Studies program. He received his PhD in History from Columbia University, where he specialized in Jewish and Central European History. Michael’s research focuses on the impact of nationality conflicts on the religious, cultural, and political development of Central European Jewry in the long nineteenth century. His articles have appeared in Slavic Review, Austrian History Yearbook, Simon Dubnow Institute Yearbook, Múlt és Jövő , The Jewish Quarterly Review and AJS Review. Miller’s book, Rabbis and Revolution: The Jews of Moravia in the Age of Emancipation, was published by Stanford University Press in 2011. It appeared in Czech translation as Moravští Židé v době emancipace (Nakladatelství Lidové noviny, 2015). He is currently working on a history of Hungarian Jewry, titled Manovill: A Tale of Two Hungarys.

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