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The University of Southampton
The Parkes Institute

Doctoral Seminars

Please find below a programme of the Doctoral Seminars happening in 2020-21.

Please note that these seminars are only open to Parkes MA and PhD students and staff.

Parkes Doctoral Seminar 2020-21

Wednesdays - 16:15-17:45

For previous doctoral seminars, please visit the archive page.

 

Date

Venue

Presenter

Topic

14 October

16:15-17:45

MS Teams

Reading Group

Theme: Childhood

Reading:

- Maxine Rhodes (2000), ‘Approaching the history of childhood: Frameworks for local research’, Family & Community History, 3:2, pp. 121-134.

- Dana Mihăilescu (2019), ‘Representations of Jewish childhood from 1950s Communist Romania in memoirs by women émigré authors to the United States’, East European Jewish Affairs, 49:1, pp. 42-62.

This might include how and why studies of childhood have informed historical research, and the pathways that might be developed or followed in future.

28 October

16:15-17:45

MS Teams Reading Group  

Theme: Difficult Histories

Reading:

- David Thelen, ‘Making History and Making the United States’, Journal of American Studies, 32, 3 (1998), pp. 373-97.

- Victor Jeleniewski Seidler, ‘Holocaust Ethics: Difficult Histories and Threatening Memories‘,European Judaism, 47, 1 (2014), pp. 76-98.

This workshop explores the theme of ‘difficult history’ which led to much excellent discussion in last year’s iteration of the doctoral seminar. Questions might include what types of histories are considered ‘difficult’, and how and why ideas of what these are can change over time. Other possibilities could be to explore how ‘difficult history’ is taught and/or presented: in schools, museums, public exhibitions and so on. 

11 November

16:15-17:45


MS Teams Reading Group

 
Theme: Sensuality

Reading:

- George Morris, ‘Historiographical Review. Intimacy in Modern British History’, The Historical Journal, 2020, pp. 1-16.

Sensuality – taste, touch, physical sensations – has become more established as a theme of historical enquiry in its own right in recent years. This workshop will explore current research pathways and as historians how we might engage with the theme of sensuality in our own research more.

25 November

16:15-17:45


 

MS Teams Reading Group

Theme: Philosemitism

Reading:

- William D. Rubenstein and Hilary L. Rubenstein, ‘The Jewish Emergence from Powerlessness’: Philosemitism in the Contemporary World, 1945 to the Present’, in W. D. Rubenstein et al., Philosemitism (1999), pp. 189-203.

Questions might include what is philosemitism, who supports it, and why? Why might we have seen a resurgence of philosemitism in the contemporary world?

9 December

16:15-17:45

MS Teams Nicola Woodhead

Theme: 'What is the Kindertransport?'

Reading: TBC

6 January 2021

16:15-17:45

MS Teams Joseph Finlay

Theme: 'British Jews and immigration politics, 1972-1993.''

Reading: TBC

19 January 2021

16:15-17:45

 

MS Teams Katie Power, Verity Steele, Joseph Finlay

Theme: 'Parkes Doctoral Roundtable.'

Reading: TBC

17 February 2021

16:15-17:45

MS Teams Reading Group  

Theme: Positionality in studying Jewish history.

Reading:

- Bos, Pascale, ‘Positionality and Postmemory in Scholarship on the Holocaust’, Women in German Yearbook, vol. 19, 2003, pp. 50–74.

- Waterston, Alisse, and Barbara Rylko-Bauer, ‘Out of the Shadows of History and Memory: Personal Family Narratives in Ethnographies of Rediscovery’, American Ethnologist, vol. 33, no. 3, 2006, pp. 397–412.

This workshop will consider issues of in how both Jews and non-Jews study Jewish history, thinking about authorship and issues of perspective. We might consider in line with the two readings what insights social and cultural anthropology can provide for the historian. 

 

3 March 2021

16:15-17:45

MS Teams Reading Group  

Theme: Discourses Surrounding Antisemitism.

Reading:

- Brian Klug, ‘What do we mean when we say ‘antisemitism?’ Echoes of shattering glass’, Proceedings, ‘Antisemitism in Europe today’, 8-9 November 2013.

- Working definition of antisemitism, via Holocaust Remembrance, https://www.holocaustremembrance.com/working-definition-antisemitism

How have discourses on or about antisemitism changed over time, including in the modern day? We can consider contrasting and contested definitions of what antisemitism means and how it affects our understanding of history, but also academic approaches to antisemitism. 

 

17 March 2021

16:15-17:45

MS Teams Reading Group  

Theme: Discourses Surrounding Antisemitism.

Reading:

- Dekel-Chan, ‘Between Myths, Memories, History and Politics: Creating Content for Moscow’s Jewish Museum and Tolerance Centre’, The Public Historian, Vol. 40, No. 4, 2018, pp. 91-106.

- Bunzl, Matti’, Of Holograms and Storage Areas: Modernity and Postmodernity at Vienna's Jewish Museum’, Cultural Anthropology, Vol. 18, No. 4, 2003, pp. 435–468

Optional Reading:

- Melissa Eddy, ‘What and Whom are Jewish Museums For?’, The New York Times, 9 July 2019

How do different museums with a specific focus on Jewry present their stories? Why do they do this? What is a ‘Jewish’ museum? Are there things that make it different from other types of museum? This session can consider several different case studies from around Europe and the world.

 

 

14 April 2021

16:15-17:45

MS Teams Workshop Discussion

Theme: Life after the Ph.D.

We can use this session to think about what happens once you’ve finished your Ph.D. – academic careers, alternative career path and future prospects.

 

28 April 2021

16:15-17:45

MS Teams Reading Group  

Theme: Discussion of Adam Sutcliffe’s book, ‘What are Jews For?’

E-copy in library; discussion/thought about Adam Sutcliffe’s recent thought-provoking book. 

 

12 May 2021

16:15-17:45

MS Teams  Uri Agnon Theme: Discussion of work-in-progress, practice-led research 

26 May 2021

16:15-17:45

MS Teams Ph.D. workshop Theme: How to prepare for a Viva.

 

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