The University of Southampton
Population Health

Professor Danny Dorling: Are more people dying because the rich are getting richer at the expense of the rest?Event

homeless man
Date:
17:00 - 18:30, 14 January 2016
Venue:
University of Southampton, Highfield Campus, Building 32 Room 1015
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For more information regarding this event, please telephone Frances Clarke on 023 8059 8975 or email fmc@soton.ac.uk .

Event details

The University of Southampton's Population Health USRG is delighted to be hosting a talk which examines the way that evidence is beginning to surface, of the possible health effects of the rapid social polarisation that is taking place in the UK.

Evidence is beginning to surface of the possible health effects of the rapid social polarisation that is taking place in the UK. This evidence is often hidden, or at the very least hard to find, but it will soon emerge more fully into public debate: there has been a stalling in one of the key official indicators of health improvement in the UK in recent years. One key indicator concerns Potential Years Lost of Life or early mortality, among men. Professor Danny Dorling's talk will examine evidence, such as the fact that, during late 2015 it emerged that there had been a rapid rise in mortality due to drug poisoning in England. Earlier deaths of elderly women had risen in absolute terms and life expectancy fell for that group in the UK. However overall life expectancy in the UK rose as immigration rose and more healthy migrants arrived. How can we begin to try to understand all this in a context of high inequalities of income and rising inequality in wealth? And where are we heading in terms of future economic precarity and likely health outcomes, including for our mental health?

Professor Danny Dorling lecture

'Do more people die because the rich get richer at the rest's expense?'

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Speaker information

Professor Danny Dorling,University of Oxford,Professor Dorling's work concerns issues of housing, health, employment, education and poverty. He was employed as a play-worker in children’s summer play-schemes. He learnt the ethos of pre-school education where the underlying rationale was that playing is learning for living. He tries not to forget this. He is an Academician of the Academy of the Learned Societies in the Social Sciences, Honorary President of the Society of Cartographers and a patron of Roadpeace, the national charity for road crash victims.

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