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The University of Southampton
Psychology
Phone:
(023) 8059 2358
Email:
A.Bennetts@soton.ac.uk

Dr Alison Bennetts BSc (Hons), MSc, DClinPsych, CPsychol

Senior Teaching Fellow in Clinical Psychology

Dr Alison Bennetts's photo

Dr Alison Bennetts is a Senior Teaching Fellow in Clinical Psychology at The University of Southampton. She also works as a Chartered Clinical Psychologist in the National Health Service (NHS).

I completed my Doctorate in Clinical Psychology at The University of Southampton, with specialist skills in Family Therapy for Anorexia Nervosa (FT-AN) and a research thesis compromising a systematic review of experimental investigations of paranoia and original empirical research into the role of mental imagery in non-clinical paranoia.

Since joining the Doctorate in Clinical Psychology (DClin) programme at The University of Southampton, I have been appointed Module Lead for Transdiagnostic Processes, and other responsibilities include research supervision, teaching, and personal clinical tutoring across DClin and Masters programmes. I am keen to supervise further research projects in the following areas:

Alongside my role at the University, I work clinically in the NHS specialising in severe and enduring mental illness in the inpatient setting (previously psychiatric intensive care, currently secure services). In my career to date, I have trained in Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT), Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT), and family and systemic approaches. I have disseminated practice-based evaluations relevant to acute-care practice and presented my original research into mental imagery and non-clinical paranoia at the British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies (BABCP) conference in 2018.

Prior to training, I gained experience in a variety of clinical settings including neurorehabilitation, dementia care and eating disorders services, and contributed to research in neuroimaging, conversation analysis and brief intervention for eating disorders.

Qualifications

BSc (Hons), MSc, DClinPsych, CPsychol

Registered with the Health Care Professions Council (HCPC; Practitioner Psychologist) and The British Psychological Society (Chartered member; Division of Clinical Psychology; Faculties of Forensic Psychology; Psychosis and Complex Mental Health, Holistic Psychology, and Eating Disorders; Male Psychology Section)

Research interests

  • Yoga theory and the psychological benefits of yoga practice/therapy
  • Mechanisms of change in severe and enduring presentations
  • Inpatient mental health care
  • Male psychology

How does yoga therapy and practice yield psychological benefits? A review and model of transdiagnostic processes (theoretical paper, in prep).

Co-Supervisor on the following DClin projects:

  • Yoga, compassion, self-criticism and wellbeing: Exploring mechanisms of change.
  • Factors affecting transition between child and adult mental health services
  • An investigation of the mental health benefits of bouldering exercise

Supervisor of the following MSc projects:

  • Yoga practice and psychological wellbeing: Exploring emotion regulation and sleep
  • Yoga, self-compassion and wellbeing: A qualitative investigation of mechanisms of change

Part of a wider research team investigating engagement, attachment and symptoms in acute mental health care.

Past projects:

Understanding the factors which facilitate the engagement of men in psychological therapy

Research project(s)

The psychological benefits of yoga practice

An investigation of the mental health benefits of bouldering exercise

  • Personal Clinical Tutor for Trainee Clinical Psychologists.
  • Research supervisor.
  • Module Co-ordinator for PSYC8037: Transdiagnostic Processes.

Module Lead for Transdiagnostic Processes on the Doctorate in Clinical Psychology programme

Dr Alison Bennetts
Building 44 Highfield Campus University of Southampton SO17 1BJ

Room Number NNN: 44/3107

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