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Markets as a Structural Solution to Knowledge-Sharing Dilemmas Seminar

Time:
16:00 - 17:00
Date:
7 February 2013
Venue:
Building 44 (Shackleton) Room 3095 University of Southampton Highfield Campus Southampton SO17 1BJ

For more information regarding this seminar, please telephone Allyson Marchi on 02380 599645 or email A.Marchi@soton.ac.uk .

Event details

The authors propose a new structural solution to the knowledge-sharing dilemma. They show that simple auction mechanisms, which impose a rigid set of rules designed to standardize interactions and communication among participants, can prevent some of the detrimental effects associated with conflict of interest in freely interacting groups.

The authors propose a new structural solution to the knowledge-sharing dilemma. They show that simple auction mechanisms, which impose a rigid set of rules designed to standardize interactions and communication among participants, can prevent some of the detrimental effects associated with conflict of interest in freely interacting groups.

The authors report results of two experiments that show that transparent conflicts of interest lead to a breakdown of information sharing, learning, and knowledge transfer in freely interacting groups, but not in simple markets and auctions. In these settings, participants were able to identify the best candidate in a voting game and to learn the solution to an intellective reasoning task, allowing participants to successfully transfer their insights to a series of new intellective tasks (tackled up to four weeks later), despite the conflicts of interests among traders. The authors explain their findings within the theoretical framework of collective induction.

Speaker information

Dr Boris Maciejovsky, Imperial College, London. Boris holds undergraduate degrees in Psychology and International Business Administration, a doctoral degree in Psychology (all from the University of Vienna), and a PhD in Marketing from the Sloan School of Management, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Prior to joining Imperial College Business School, Boris held research positions at the Humboldt-University Berlin, the Max Planck Institute of Economics, and the London School of Economics.

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