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Web-based support suitable for people with lower levels of health literacy: intervention development and qualitative evaluation Seminar

Time:
17:00 - 18:00
Date:
11 November 2013
Venue:
Academic Unit of Psychology Shackleton Building (44), Room 1087 Highfield Campus University of Southampton Southampton SO17 1BJ

For more information regarding this seminar, please telephone Allyson Marchi on 02380 599645 or email A.Marchi@soton.ac.uk .

Event details

The ‘Healthy Living with Diabetes’ intervention has been developed to examine the potential for web-based materials and tools to provide enhanced support for people with lower levels of health literacy, using interactivity and tailoring. This talk will provide an overview of the intervention development, and demonstrate the interactive and tailored web-based materials to be trialled across several countries next year.

 The ‘Healthy Living with Diabetes' intervention has been developed to examine the potential for web-based materials and tools to provide enhanced support for people with lower levels of health literacy, using interactivity and tailoring. This talk will provide an overview of the intervention development, and demonstrate the interactive and tailored web-based materials to be trialled across several countries next year.

 

We will also be presenting the results from our qualitative study that aimed to explore how people with varying levels of health literacy experienced different elements of web-based materials. Think aloud methods were used to elicit the views and experiences of 35 UK participants with Type 2 Diabetes engaging with our web-based materials. Thematic analysis identified key themes emerging from the data covering motivational factors, learning new information, experiences of using a planner, reactions to interactive and audio-visual content.

Speaker information

Dr Ingrid Muller and Alison Rowsell,Research Fellows in Health Psychology

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