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PsychologyOur news, events & seminars

Behavioural and emotional problems in young children with intellectual disability and/or autism: Using secondary analysis methods to explore the role of family context Seminar

Time:
16:00 - 17:00
Date:
20 February 2014
Venue:
Psychology Department Room 3095, Building 44 (Shackleton) Highfield Campus Southampton SO17 1BJ

For more information regarding this seminar, please telephone Allyson Marchi on 02380 599645 or email A.Marchi@soton.ac.uk .

Event details

Children and adolescents with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) are at increased risk for mental health problems compared with children without such disabilities.

 Children and adolescents with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) are at increased risk for mental health problems compared with children without such disabilities. In this presentation, I will discuss data from secondary analyses of UK population-based studies that confirm this increased risk associated with both autism and intellectual disability.

Along the way, I will explain the potential for studies such as the ONS Child and Adolescent Mental Health Surveys and the Millennium Cohort Study (MCS) for researchers in the IDD field. Focusing on MCS data, I will then examine longitudinal analysis of early developmental pathways for mental health problems in children with IDD. Specifically, I will present data on parental mental health and parenting behaviours as risk and compensatory variables. Implications for early intervention for children with IDD will be drawn by way of conclusion.

Speaker information

Professor Richard Hastings, University of Warwick. Professor Hastings joined CEDAR as a Professor in 2013, having moved from the School of Psychology at Bangor University. His first degree and PhD were both in Psychology and from the University of Southampton. In addition to carrying out teaching and research in Southampton, he has worked at the Institute of Child Health (University College London), and Bangor University.

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