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Groups, Violence and Bystander Behaviour: Understanding Pro-Social and Anti-Social Behaviour in Public Places Seminar

Time:
16:00 - 17:00
Date:
15 May 2014
Venue:
Room 3095 Building 44 (Shackleton) University of Southampton Highfield Campus Southampton SO17 1BJ

For more information regarding this seminar, please telephone Allyson Marchi on 02380 599645 or email A.Marchi@soton.ac.uk .

Event details

In this talk I will describe a program of research that explores how the social psychology of group processes can be used to tackle anti-social and violent behaviour in public. I will begin by describing a systematic, frame-by-frame analysis of 42 episodes of public aggression captured on a single city centre CCTV surveillance system. I will show that, contrary to popular belief, third parties are more likely to conciliate than escalate violence.

 

In this talk I will describe a program of research that explores how the social psychology of group processes can be used to tackle anti-social and violent behaviour in public.  I will begin by describing a systematic, frame-by-frame analysis of 42 episodes of public aggression captured on a single city centre CCTV surveillance system. I will show that, contrary to popular belief, third parties are more likely to conciliate than escalate violence.

I will also outline the pattern of third party behaviors that are most likely to prevent aggression from becoming violence. I will then describe a series of experiments carried out in a fully immersive virtual environment in which participants are exposed to a violent altercation between life-sized avatars in a virtual pub. By manipulating the social identity relationships between perpetrator, victim and bystanders we explore the effects of group processes on willingness to intervene. I will conclude with some observations about how group processes can be harnessed to develop effective public order interventions.

Speaker information

Professor Mark Levine, University of Exeter . Mark Levine is a Professor of Social Psychology at the University of Exeter. His research focuses on the role of social identity in pro-social and anti-social behaviour.

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