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The University of Southampton
PsychologyOur news, events & seminars

The role of social thermoregulation in psychological functioning Seminar

Time:
16:00 - 17:00
Date:
21 May 2015
Venue:
University of Southampton Highfield Campus Building 44 (Shackleton Building) Level 1, Room 1087

For more information regarding this seminar, please telephone Sue McNally on 023 8059 5150 or email S.McNally .

Event details

One of the most striking features of animal sociality is the tendency to regulate each other’s temperature. This ability has received wide coverage across different animal species, and has become known as social thermoregulation.

One of the most striking features of animal sociality is the tendency to regulate each other’s temperature. This ability has received wide coverage across different animal species, and has become known as social thermoregulation. In fact, in rodents, social thermoregulation is only one of two supported causes for group living (risk avoidance is the other; Ebensberger, 2001). In humans, normal development to adulthood depends on the ability to regulate one’s temperature, and the inability to do so means certain death.

Despite the crucial role of social thermoregulation in animal sociality and in human survival, the concept of social thermoregulation has not been extended to higher order cognitive functioning in humans. In this talk, I will outline the role of social thermoregulation in three important domains of psychology: Emotion theories, attachment theory, and self regulation. I will rely on economy of action perspectives and the hierarchical organization of the mind in order to understand just why social thermoregulation is so critical in human functioning.

Speaker information

Dr Hans IJzerman, VU University, Amsterdam. Hans IJzerman is an assistant professor at the Department of Clinical Psychology and a recipient of the prestigious Veni grant. In Amsterdam, he heads the Amsterdam Emotion Regulation Lab, together with Sander Koole. He has worked as a visiting researcher at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, the University of Virginia, Pontifícia Universidade Católica-São Paulo, and the Center for Open Science in Charlottesville.

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