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PsychologyOur news, events & seminars

The Cultural Context Of The Birth Of British Clinical Psychology Seminar

Time:
12:30 - 13:30
Date:
15 October 2015
Venue:
Unversity of Southampton Highfield Campus Building 44 (Shackleton) Room 3031/3033

For more information regarding this seminar, please telephone Sue McNally on 02380 595150 or email S.McNally@soton.ac.uk .

Event details

This presentation is a summary of a chapter (written with Professor Nimisha Patel from the University of East London) in a new book about the history of British clinical psychology to be launched at the DCP Conference in December 2015.

 

This presentation is a summary of a chapter (written with Professor Nimisha Patel from the University of East London) in a new book about the history of British clinical psychology to be launched at the DCP Conference in December 2015*. The focus of the paper is on the strands of British culture which both shaped the emergence of clinical psychology here, as well as providing it with a particular character. The elements of the presentation include: the global setting of Britain; health and welfare after 1945; intellectual legacies in post-War Britain; the twin towers of empiricism and eugenics; the racialised character of post-colonial British psychology; and a summary discussion of post-War post-colonialism.

*Hall, J., Pilgrim, D. and Turpin, G. (2015) (eds) Clinical Psychology in Britain : Historical Perspectives London: BPS.

 

 

Speaker information

Professor David Pilgrim, University of Liverpool. Professor David Pilgrim, Professor of Health & Social Policy has spent the past 30 years dividing his time equally between work in the NHS and in higher education. He is a clinical psychologist and medical sociologist and his clinical work was mainly in acute psychiatry and secure provision. His academic activity has been mainly in the field of mental health policy and the history of ideas in relation to mental abnormality. He has a wide experience in the postgraduate teaching of psychologists, social workers and psychiatrists, and has supervised several research students to PhD completion and dozens to Masters level in psychology and social work. His current research interests include mental health policy and the history and philosophy of mental health and mental disorder.

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