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The University of Southampton
Southampton Neuroscience Group

Never mind the Neuro-B……ks: it’s the Syn-ap-ses  Event

Time:
17:30
Date:
1 November 2013
Venue:
Turner Sims Concert Hall Highfield Campus Refreshments: Teas and coffee will be served in the Turners Sims Concert Hall Foyer at 5pm. Drinks and buffet reception will be held after the Lecture

For more information regarding this event, please email Selina Barry at S.J.Barry@soton.ac.uk .

Event details

You are cordially invited to the Inaugural Lecture of Professor Vincent O’Connor, Professor of Neurochemistry

Chaired by: Mr Paul Brown Esq (B of B Hons)

The brain, in addition to being Woody Allen’s second favourite organ, plays an essential role in the human condition. It harbours an intricate interplay between molecules, cells and systems which in the context of the whole animal allow for the expression of behaviour.

I have used my on-going education to develop an interest in how the molecules of the brain help control nerve function and behaviour. I am particularly interested in synapses, a small part or sub-cellular compartment of nerves that allows them to communicate with each other. For most of us, human behaviour is a reality and biochemistry is an esoteric concept. On the contrary, to a small band, brain biochemistry or neurochemistry is how we like to investigate brain function. I hope to communicate how what might appear to be an esoteric interest in brain molecules can provide useful insights. This insight helps understand how the brain works and how it can go wrong. In addition, I will try to touch on how these efforts in basic science, motivated by interest, might be useful.

I have been encouraged in these studies by mentors, colleagues/friends, institutions and pots of public funds: my musings will try to reflect on some of these important inputs that have helped my scientific development. We are all prone to philosophy and Neuroscience, as much as any discipline, provides a biological route into the human condition. I hope to show you how synapses might be at the heart of this.

 

RSVP: fnesdean@soton.ac.uk

 

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