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Sustainability Science

SSS Discussion Groups

Academics and members of Sustainability Science at Southampton have developed a numbe of discussion groups across the university to share knowledge, stimulate debate and advance our understanding of the interdisplinary research that underpins all pillars of sustainability science: economic growth, social development, and environmental protection.

Current SSS discussion groups:

 

Human dimensions of Resilience, Adaptation and Vulnerability' DISCUSSION GROUP

 

All faculty, post-docs and PhD students are invited to the monthly meeting of the 'Human dimensions of Resilience, Adaptation and Vulnerability' DISCUSSION GROUP. We meet in the Geography & Environment coffee room 44/1089 - please sign up to the SSS mailing list to receive emailed invitations which include the confirmed date, time, and location.

All University of Southampton PhD students, post docs and faculty are welcome, but please email e.l.tompkins@soton.ac.uk to let me know if you plan to join us so I can get a larger room if needed.

Background to the group

A small group of UoS researchers (post-doc and PhD) and staff have decided to meet once a month, to discuss the following ideas:

- ecological resilience

- social resilience

- measurement /monitoring of resilience  / safe operating spaces

- adaptive capacity

- vulnerability (incl measurement)

- hazards/ disasters / catastrophes related to resilience

- the role of institutions / social capital/ networks/behaviours/ assets and obligations in informing resilience

- intentionality/human agency and the capacity to cause /influence

- neoliberalism and the politics of resilience

- risk and uncertainty

 

Please see SSS events page for upcoming discussion group dates.

 

Foresight report - Government office of science image

Global environmental change and demographic shifts are likely to continue over the next three decades, leading to greater hazard exposure and vulnerability, as well as reduced resilience and increased uncertainties.

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