SOTON ASTRODOME: Explore the Astrophysics of our Universe


EST JUNE 2011:

Since the birth of Soton Astrodome, the team of PhDs and Undergrad astronomers AKA #OurGreatestTeam have done astrodome shows at over 500 schools free of charge. Our astronomy outreach and public engagement program has engaged with over 90,000 people.


NEW FOR THIS ACADEMIC YEAR:

For the 2019/2020 academic year we have a strategic program called 'Learning about the Aurora' and the Astrodome will form part of this. Therefore, For this year only the Astrodome team will ONLY be delivering shows to 4 local schools and their year 8 students.

We are delivering a themed program which includes an astrodome visit first, and then an follow up workshop on the Aurora Zoo

Then the same year 8 students experiencing a SEPnet workshop called Connect Physics

In the final part of the program the year 8 students who make scientific posters about the aurora research will recieve a Discovery Level CREST STEM Award

I am sorry, but, as our focus is now year 8 students in local 'Widening Participation' schools. This means we will NOT be able to offer ANY free visits to other schools this year.

If you are a local school with a year 8 cohort that might be interested in signing up for this program, or at least 2 parts of it, then please do email Sadie for more information. Lessons plans for each part of the program are available.

If you are a primary school that wants a mobile planetarium or if you think that your school does not fit with our new remit then please note that there are several other mobile planetarium across the South of England that offer school visits, please go onto the website, linked below, and type in your school postcode to find local planetaria

STRATEGIC AIM FOR LEARNING ABOUT THE AURORA :

To encourage and enable Year 8 Students to contribute to cutting edge research into the aurora.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

For KS3 Science students to: have their understanding of the earth’s position in the solar system and our galaxy reinforced; to be able to explain the difference between a star and planet; define the aurora; understand how the aurora is produced; classify different auroral shapes in terms of morphology and dynamism; understand why research into the aurora and space weather is important and to be inspired to observe the night sky with their curiosity in space stimulated; have a more positive attitude toward science and scientists making them more likely see themselves as scientists and to want to study science further and consider a career in science.