Skip to main navigationSkip to main content
The University of Southampton
PsychologyOur news, events & seminars

Self-Superiority Beliefs: The Debate Between Self-Enhancement and Cognitive Egocentrism Revisited Seminar

Time:
16:00 - 17:00
Date:
4 June 2015
Venue:
Building 44 (Shackleton) Room 1087 University of Southampton Highfield Campus Southampton SO17 1BJ

For more information regarding this seminar, please telephone Sue McNally on 02380 595150 or email S.McNally@soton.ac.uk .

Event details

When judging themselves as compared to others, people report that they are in many respects superior. Motivational and cognitive explanations for self-superiority beliefs have been proposed, with cognitive explanations currently being dominant.

When judging themselves as compared to others, people report that they are in many respects superior. Motivational and cognitive explanations for self-superiority beliefs have been proposed, with cognitive explanations currently being dominant.

The most prominent motivational explanation states that self-superiority beliefs serve a self-enhancement motive in that they serve to enhance one's feelings of self-worth. The most prominent cognitive explanation, the cognitive egocentrism hypothesis, states that self-superiority biases derive from the differential accessibility of or differential focus on self-versus other related information.

I present correlational and experimental evidence from a set of studies that were designed to pit cognitive egocentrism and self-enhancement against each other. Whereas the pattern of correlations between relative self-judgments, absolute self- and other-judgments, and self-esteem scores was consistent with both explanations, experimentally induced self-threat affected self-superiority beliefs following the pattern predicted by the self-enhancement hypothesis only. The self-enhancement motive does drive self-superiority biases.

Speaker information

Professor Vera Hoorens, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium. Professor Vera Hoorens has worked at the Centre for Social and Cultural Psychology, KU Leuven since 1998.

Privacy Settings