Professor Sally Ward becomes Fellow of the Royal Society

A pioneer of cancer research at the Centre for Cancer Immunology has been named a Fellow of the Royal Society.


Oxygen starvation makes tumours more resistant to antibody treatment

A lack of oxygen (hypoxia) makes tumours more resistant to antibody treatments, according to a new study by scientists at the Centre for Cancer Immunology.


Third COVID-19 vaccination improves immune response in blood cancer patients

Dr Sean Lim, based at the Centre for Cancer Immunology, has led new research that shows the weakened immune systems of blood cancer patients can improve after they receive a third COVID-19 vaccination.


New insight into how antibodies bind to the immune system

Centre research, published in Communications Biology, describes the factors which control the ability of antibodies targeting CD27 to stimulate the immune system.


New research to improve treatment for breast cancer

A new study at the Centre for Cancer Immunology is aiming to improve treatment of chemotherapy-refractory breast cancer patients.


Research from Southampton scientists receives FDA support

For decades, Southampton researchers have been at the forefront of developing new treatments for cancer and other diseases.


New research published for World Cancer Day

A new study from scientists at the Centre for Cancer Immunology has revealed further insight into the mechanisms of immune checkpoint blocking antibodies.


Funding innovative ideas for the next generation of better treatments for cancer

Scientists at the Centre for Cancer Immunology are now able to develop their innovative ideas for new cancer treatments thanks to support from the Bernard Sunley Foundation.


Combining immunotherapies to tackle treatment resistance in lymphoma

Combining two different immunotherapy drugs could help to tackle treatment resistance in patients with B cell lymphoma, results from a clinical trial have suggested.


Drug enhances immune system to kill cancer cells

Scientists in the Faculty of Medicine, including those based in the Centre for Cancer Immunology, have discovered added benefits from using a drug called Selinexor to treat cancer.