The University of Southampton
Engineering and the Environment
Phone:
(023) 8059 2459
Email:
A.Zervos@soton.ac.uk

Dr Antonis Zervos CivEng/NTUA PhD/NTUA FHEA

Associate Professor in Geomechanics, Deputy Head of the Infrastructure Research Group

Dr Antonis Zervos's photo
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Dr Antonis Zervos is Associate Professor in Geomechanics within Engineering and the Environment at the University of Southampton.

Current position

Antonis Zervos is Associate Professor in Geomechanics and Deputy Head of the Infrastructure Research Group.

Career history

Antonis Zervos graduated in 1996 from the Faculty of Civil Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, with a 5-year degree in Civil Engineering. In the same year he joined the Doctoral Programme of NTUA’s Department of Mechanics, from where he obtained a PhD in 2001. His research was sponsored by Schlumberger Cambridge Research through a research assistantship at their Cambridge facilities between 1996 and 2001. After obtaining his PhD he worked as a consultant before joining the University of Southampton in 2002.

He has served as panel member for Géotechnique (2009-2012), as Vice-chair of UK’s Association for Computational Mechanics - UK-ACM, at the time called ACME (2009-2010), and as external evaluator on behalf of the Romanian National Research Council and the Hellenic Quality Assurance and Accreditation Agency.

He is a member of: the Editorial Board of Elsevier's "Geomechanics for Energy and the Environment" journal, the UK-ACM Board, the Board of Directors of the ALERT/Geomaterials European network of geomechanics experts, and the EPSRC Peer Review College. He also serves as external evaluator for the European Commission’s Research Executive Agency.

His Web of Knowledge ResearcherID record is A-8609-2008.

His ORCID ID is 0000-0002-2662-9320

Research

Publications

Teaching

Contact

Research interests

Antonis Zervos’s technical area of expertise is the constitutive and numerical modelling of geomaterials; his work is focussed on understanding, describing mathematically and approximating numerically the mechanical behaviour of soils and rocks. He is an experienced numerical modeller with significant expertise in programming and using finite element and finite difference codes, as well as using boundary element and distinct element software

He has an active interest in the following applications:

  • The mechanics of railway ballast and ballasted track. The majority of the railway network in the UK and worldwide is on ballasted track. Better scientific understanding of its mechanics and the interaction of its components will allow the design of more robust railway track that needs maintenance less often.
  • The mechanics of catastrophic landslides. Large scale catastrophic landslides on land or under sea can be a major threat to human life and infrastructure. Better understanding the conditions under which they may develop and the factors that govern their catastrophic potential will enable the design of appropriate mitigation measures and robust defences.
  • The mechanics of oceanic sediments bearing gas-hydrates. Gas hydrates are ice-like compounds of water and natural gas and can be found under particular high-pressure, low-temperature ocean environments. They are important as a future energy source but also as a hazard to offshore operations. Better understanding their mechanics will lead to more robust techniques for their detection and more reliable predictions of the danger they potentially pose to offshore infrastructure.
  • Modelling the effects of material microstructure. Although their effect is largely ignored in the theoretical framework that underpins every-day practice, the microstructural details (e.g. grain size) of a soil or rock may come to dominate its mechanical response. Our research develops theoretical and numerical tools for including such information when predicting material behaviour.

Finally, geomaterial modelling is an integral part of tackling problems relevant to the production of oil and natural gas. Mostly during his time at Schlumberger Cambridge Research, Antonis Zervos carried out research and consultancy on petroleum geomechanics, and particularly on hydraulic fracturing, on the stability of inclined wellbores and perforations, on wellbore-screen interaction, and on stress determination around large geological structures.

Research group(s)

Infrastructure Group

Research project(s)

Mechanics of landslides

Large-scale landslides can seriously threaten human life and infrastructure over extensive areas, by rapidly moving substantial volumes of material and even by causing catastrophic tsunamis. Better understanding their mechanics is key for predicting such events and protecting ourselves from their consequences.

Track 21 - Railway Track for the 21st Century

Modelling the effects of material microstructure

Although their effect is largely ignored in the theoretical framework that underpins every-day practice, the microstructural details (e.g. grain size) of a soil or rock may come to dominate its mechanical response. Our research develops theoretical and numerical tools for including such information when predicting material behaviour.

Article(s)

Book Section(s)

Conference(s)

Dataset(s)

Code Title Role
RDGC-WSF  WRITING SKILLS FOR DOCTORAL RESEARCHERS Lecturer
SESG8001  TT Graduate School Training Lecturer
FEEG1002  MECHANICS, STRUCTURES AND MATERIALS Lecturer
CENV6122  ADVANCED FOUNDATION ENGINEERING Lecturer
CENV6156  ADVANCED FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS Coordinator
CENV6127  UNDERSTANDING CIVIL ENGINEERING Lecturer

Dr Antonis Zervos
Engineering and the Environment University of Southampton Highfield Southampton SO17 1BJ

Room Number: 7/5039

Telephone: (023) 8059 2459
Facsimile: (023) 8067 7519
Email: A.Zervos@soton.ac.uk

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