The University of Southampton
Engineering and the Environment
Phone:
(023) 8059 5473
Email:
N.W.Bressloff@soton.ac.uk

Professor Neil W Bressloff BA Hons Oxon, MSc, PhD, DIC

Professor of Biomedical Engineering & Design, Head of Computational Engineering and Design Group

Professor Neil W Bressloff's photo
Related links
Personal homepage

Professor Neil W Bressloff is Professor of Biomedical Engineering & Design within Engineering and the Environment at the University of Southampton.

Current position

As Professor of Biomedical Engineering & Design, Neil Bressloff works closely with clinicians and industry seeking to better understand a range of human diseases, particularly those in the cardiovascular system, and to design devices for treatment.

Find out more about the modern high performance computing systems we use to support our research in the video below and you can find out more here.

Career history

2013-   Faculty of Engineering & the Environment, Southampton University: Professor
2009-2013 School of Engineering Sciences, Southampton University: Senior Lecturer
1999-2009 Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Southampton University: Senior Research Fellow.
1996-1999 Dept. of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Southampton University: Research Fellow - manager of the Computational Engineering and Design Centre (CEDC)
1993-1996 School of Mechanical Engineering, Cranfield University: Research Assistant (PhD)
1991-1992   MSc in Advanced Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College

Feature

Nowadays, it is very common for people suffering from blocked arteries in their heart, to have them opened by the minimally invasive procedure of coronary stenting. Whilst this procedure is very effective, one can't escape the fact that the metallic stent remains in place permanently. It is not surprising, therefore, that the emergence of biodegradable coronary stents is being heralded as the next revolution in interventional cardiology. Biodegradable stents (or scaffolds) are strong enough to re-open diseased arteries but which then naturally break down in the body and disappear once the artery has recovered its function. Professor Bressloff is working with a device company, Arterius Ltd, to design and develop a new biodegradable polymer device.

  • 27 June 2017

    Engineering graduate claims gold in World ...

    Fynn Sterritt, a graduate of Aeronautics and Astronautics, together...

    Read More
  • 20 June 2017

    Optimising sporting performance

    Optimising sporting performance

    Read More
  • 12 June 2017

    We're informing energy policy in sub-sahar...

    Our research has demonstrated the importance of charcoal production...

    Read More
  • Research

    Responsibilities

    Publications

    Teaching

    Contact

    Research interests

    • Biomedical engineering
    • Cardiovascular engineering
    • Medical device design
    • Biofluid mechanics
    • Computational fluid dynamics
    • Design search and optimisation

    PhD Supervision

    Ms Alexandra Diem, Mr Jon Bailey, Mr Giorgos Ragkousis, Ms Maria Mendivil, Mr Aleksander Dubas

    Projects

    Aortic valve design. (Jon Bailey; Co-supervisor: Nick Curzen (Medicine))

    Coronary artery stent design for challenging disease. (Giorgos Ragkousis; Co-supervisor: Nick Curzen (Medicine))

    The role of arterial pulsations in perivascular drainage and its implications for alzheimer's disease. (Alex Diem; Co-supervisors: Roxanne Carare (Medicine), Giles Richardson (Maths))

     

    Much of the research we undertake is inspired by collaboration with clinicians at Southampton General Hospital and with biomedical device companies. Click on the buttons below to find out more.

    Biomedical devices

    Biomedical Devices

    Computational engineering design of devices for the treatment of heart disease.

    Design tool

    Design Tool

    Interactive tool for the design of biomedical devices.

    Design strategies

    Design Strategies

    Methods for accelerating the computational engineering design process.

     

    Other projects


    Complexity in modelling electric marine propulsive devices. (Alexsander Dubas; Lead supervisor: Suleiman Abu-Sharkh)

    Development of a multi-physics modelling framework to characterise the interactions of skin and wet shaving products. (Maria Mendivil; Lead supervisor: Georges Limbert)

     

    Design optimisation leads to competition between design variables.
    Which stent?
    Optimal design of a stent may involve conflicting requirements with respect to blood flow and drug release.
    Flow and drug elution.
    See our Biomaterials paper to read more on the multi-objective, multi-disciplinary design optimisation of coronary stents.
    Multi-objective stent design.
    Simulation of stent deployment in a reconstructed coronary artery.
    Patient specific design.
    Artifical heart valves are increasingly being deployed as replacements.
    Aortic valve design.
    Simulation and experiments of flow through micro-networks.
    Lab-on-a-chip.

    Projects

    Aortic valve design. (Jon Bailey; Co-supervisor: Nick Curzen (Medicine))

    Coronary artery stent design for challenging disease. (Giorgos Ragkousis; Co-supervisor: Nick Curzen (Medicine))

    The role of arterial pulsations in perivascular drainage and its implications for alzheimer's disease. (Alex Diem; Co-supervisors: Roxanne Carare (Medicine), Giles Richardson (Maths))

     

    Much of the research we undertake is inspired by collaboration with clinicians at Southampton General Hospital and with biomedical device companies. Click on the buttons below to find out more.

    Design tool

    Design tool

    Interactive tool for the design of biomedical devices.

    Design strategies

    Design Strategies

    Methods for accelerating the computational engineering design process.

     

    Other projects


    Complexity in modelling electric marine propulsive devices. (Alexsander Dubas; Lead supervisor: Suleiman Abu-Sharkh)

    Development of a multi-physics modelling framework to characterise the interactions of skin and wet shaving products. (Maria Mendivil; Lead supervisor: Georges Limbert)

     

    Design optimisation leads to competition between design variables.
    Which stent?
    Optimal design of a stent may involve conflicting requirements with respect to blood flow and drug release.
    Flow and drug elution.
    See our Biomaterials paper to read more on the multi-objective, multi-disciplinary design optimisation of coronary stents.
    Multi-objective stent design.
    Simulation of stent deployment in a reconstructed coronary artery.
    Patient specific design.
    Artifical heart valves are increasingly being deployed as replacements.
    Aortic valve design.
    Simulation and experiments of flow through micro-networks.
    Lab-on-a-chip.

    Research group

    Computational Engineering and Design

    Affiliate research group

    Bioengineering Science

    Research project(s)

    Coronary Artery Stent Design for Challenging Disease

    In treating coronary artery disease with percutaneous coronary intervention, stent malapposition is to be avoided. The focus here is to design stents that minimise malapposition in challenging disease.

    Towards Prediction of Paravalvular Leakage and Leaflet Stress Following Deployment of a Balloon-Expandable Transcutaneous Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) Device in Critical Aortic Stenosis: A Computer Simulation Model

    To construct a computer model of a state of the art TAVI device to simulate deployment in a diseased native valve in order to assess the factors associated with paravalvular leakage (PL) and the stresses in the implant leaflets, with a view to formulating beneficial modification.

    The Role of Arterial Pulsations in Perivascular Drainage and its Implications for Alzheimer's Disease

    Perivascular drainage is an important process for the elimination of metabolic solutes from the brain. The failure of this process has important medical implications and the subsequent accumulation of the protein Aβ leads to the development of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). This project aims at resolving the driving forces for perivascular drainage via modelling techniques in order to inspire novel medication that might help reduce the impact of AD.

    Understanding the physics of wet shaving

    The apparently simple act of shaving with a razor and a shave preparation involves complex multi-physics interactions. Notably, it involves the flow of a non-Newtonian, shear-thinning fluid (shave preparation) around the cartridge mechanism on top of a complex highly non-linear structural material (the skin).

    Articles

    Conferences

    Report

    Module titleModule codeDisciplineRole
    Aerospace CFD SESA6027 Aerospace Engineering Course leader
    Biomedical Implants & Devices TBC (starts October 2015) Mechanical Engineering Course leader
    Design Search and Optimisation II: Case Studies SESG6019 Engineering Sciences Course leader
    Fluid Mechanics FEEG2003 Mechanical Engineering Lecturer
    Professor Neil W Bressloff
    Computational Engineering and Design Group Engineering Centre of Excellence Building 176 University of Southampton Boldrewood Campus Burgess Road Southampton SO16 7QF

    Room Number:176/5031

    Telephone:(023) 8059 5473
    Facsimile:(023) 8059 4813
    Email:N.W.Bressloff@soton.ac.uk


    Professor Neil W Bressloff's personal home page
    Share this profile Facebook Google+ Twitter Weibo

    We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

    ×