The University of Southampton
HistoryPart of Humanities
Phone:
(023) 8059 4860
Email:
mjs@soton.ac.uk

Professor Mark Stoyle 

Professor of Early Modern History, Head of Admissions, semester 2

Professor Mark Stoyle's photo
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Professor Mark Stoyle is a Professor of Early Modern History at the University of Southampton.

Having completed my undergraduate studies in History and Archaeology, I went on to undertake a DPhil thesis at St Peter’s College, Oxford. I then held a Scouloudi Fellowship at the Institute of Historical Research in London and a British Academy Post-doctoral Research Fellowship at the University of Exeter before being appointed to my present post at Southampton. I specialise in early modern British history, with particular research interests in the British crisis of the 1640s; witchcraft; urban society; and cultural, ethnic and religious identity in Wales and Cornwall between 1450 and 1700. I have written a score of scholarly articles and seven monographs, including Soldiers and Strangers: An Ethnic History of the English War (Yale University Press, 2005); The Black Legend of Prince Rupert’s Dog: Witchcraft and Propaganda during the English Civil War (University of Exeter Press, 2011); and Water in the City: The Aqueducts and Underground Passages of Exeter (University of Exeter Press, 2014). I have also appeared on many local and national radio and TV programmes, including: ‘The World at One’; ‘Who Do You Think You Are?’; ‘Making History’; ‘The Great British Story: A People’s History’, ‘Inside Out’, ‘Spotlight’; ‘Word of Mouth’ and ‘The Roots of English’. I sit on the Council of the Royal Historical Society, on the advisory board of the Victoria County History and on the editorial advisory panel of BBC History Magazine. In 2012, I received a Vice-Chancellor’s Teaching Award in recognition of my outstanding contribution to education at the University of Southampton.

I have also been interviewed for many podcasts. To listen to a recent podcast on popular allegiance in the English Civil War, please click the following link:

http://www.historyextra.com/podcast/civil-war-trail

To listen to a recent podcast on the Western Rising of 1549, please click the following link:

http://www.historyextra.com/podcast/rebellion-and-terrorism

For further details about some of my books, please click on the following links:

Soldiers and Strangers: An Ethnic History of the English Civil War

http://yalepress.yale.edu/book.asp?isbn=9780300107005

The Black Legend of Prince Rupert’s Dog: Witchcraft and Propaganda during the English Civil War

http://www.exeterpress.co.uk/en-gb/Book/536/The_Black_Legend_of_Prince_Rupert's_Dog.html

Water in the City: The Aqueducts and Underground Passages of Exeter

http://www.exeterpress.co.uk/en-gb/Book/548/Water_in_the_City.html

The Black Legend of Prince Rupert's Dog: Witchcraft and Propaganda during the English Civil War
The Black Legend
Water in the City: The Aqueducts and Underground Passages of Exeter
Water in the City
West Britons: Cornish Identities and the Early Modern British State
West Britons

Research

Publications

Teaching

Contact

Research interests

My chief research specialism is in the history of the British Civil Wars of the mid-seventeenth century. I have written widely on this theme, and have also published books and articles on witchcraft, on Cornish and Welsh ethnic identity during the Tudor and Stuart periods, on massacre and atrocity during the 1640s, on urban fortification and on the early modern town. I am currently carrying out research into: a) the Western Rising of 1549 (the so-called ‘Prayer Book Rebellion'); and b) the role played by women in the English Civil War.

Article(s)

Book(s)

Book Section(s)

Areas where I can offer postgraduate supervision:

Any area of early modern English and Welsh history between 1450 and 1660, especially on topics relating to the Civil Wars.

Professor Mark Stoyle
Building 65 Faculty of Humanities University of Southampton Avenue Campus Highfield Southampton SO17 1BF United Kingdom

Room Number: 65/2077

Telephone: (023) 8059 4860
Email: mjs@soton.ac.uk

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