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HIST3073 The Late Russian Empire, Society, Ethnicity and Culture II

Module Overview

This second part of the special subject investigates the attempts at reform, reaction and revolution in the Russian Empire from the revolution of 1905 until the collapse of Tsarism in February/March 1917 followed by the seizure of power by the Bolsheviks and Left Socialist Revolutionaries (SRs) in October/November 1917. We will explore a society that seemed on the one hand to be developing dynamically and yet on the other to be collapsing from within.

Aims and Objectives

Module Aims

• Develop your understanding of the politics, society and culture of Russia and its empire • Introduce you to the wide range of primary sources in translation associated with the period 1905 to 1917 • Develop your familiarity with the historiographical literature and debates of this revolutionary period

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge and Understanding

Having successfully completed this module, you will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

  • The social and cultural history of the Tsarist Empire since 1881
  • The long and short term causes of the revolutions of the period 1905-1917
Transferable and Generic Skills

Having successfully completed this module you will be able to:

  • Gather, assess and synthesise information
  • Communicate effectively as a leader and as a participant in group discussions
  • Display effective time-management in planning and completing set tasks
Subject Specific Practical Skills

Having successfully completed this module you will be able to:

  • Perform electronic bibliographical searches to support your research
  • Recognise and apply different methodological and interpretive approaches to translated primary sources and secondary historical works
  • Argue persuasively and cogently in written coursework and oral presentations
Subject Specific Intellectual and Research Skills

Having successfully completed this module you will be able to:

  • Analyse the relevance of a range of primary sources with regard to the context in which they were produced
  • Identify and engage critically with the major historiographical texts on the subject
  • Reflect on controversial issues in this period of Russian history, 1905-1917
  • Understand the continuities and breaks in the late imperial period of 1881-1917

Syllabus

This module builds on the foundations laid in Semester one HIST3072 to investigate the attempts at reform, reaction and revolution from the revolution of 1905 until the collapse of Tsarism and the Bolshevik seizure of power in 1917. We will explore a society that seemed on the one hand to be developing dynamically and yet on the other to be collapsing from within.

Learning and Teaching

Teaching and learning methods

Teaching methods include two double sessions per week in seminar format in which individuals give short presentations on set readings and the class as a whole analyses a variety of primary sources (in translation).

TypeHours
Independent Study264
Teaching36
Total study time300

Resources & Reading list

James Cracraft (1994). Major Problems in the History of Imperial Russia. 

J. Gooding (1996). Rulers and Subjects: government and people in Russia, 1801-1991. 

O. Figes (1996). A People’s Tragedy: The Russian Revolution 1891-1924 (. 

H Rogger (1983). Russia in the Age of Modernisation and Revolution, 1881-1917. 

I D. Thatcher (ed.) (2005). Late Imperial Russia: Problems and Prospects. 

R. Pipes (1990). The Russian Revolution 1899-1919. 

Assessment

Assessment Strategy

The secondary reading assigned for each session, as well as the independent reading from the longer bibliography included in the module handbook and your own library searches will introduce you to the ways in which historians have approached and interpreted primary sources relating to the period under study (1905-1917) and allow you to understand the revolutions of 1905 and 1917 within the wider context of the late imperial period. This will enable you to interrogate the assigned translated primary sources, while close analysis of the latter will allow you to engage with a range of perspectives on late Tsarist society and the failure of the ‘constitutional experiment’. The bibliography as well as your own literature searches will also enable you to choose a topic for the assessed essay in agreement with the module coordinator.

Summative

MethodPercentage contribution
Essay 50%
Examination  (3 hours) 50%

Repeat Information

Repeat type: Internal & External

Linked modules

Pre-requisites

To study this module, you will need to have studied the following module(s):

CodeModule
HIST3072The Late Russian Empire, Society, Ethnicity and Culture l
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