The University of Southampton
EnglishPart of Humanities

F. T. Prince Memorial Lecture 2017 Event

Origin: 
Humanities
Photo of F. T. Prince
Time:
18:00
Date:
11 October 2017
Venue:
Avenue Campus, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BF

For more information regarding this event, please email Tracy Storey at tps@southampton.ac.uk .

Event details

This is the fifth annual F.T. Prince Memorial Lecture. These lectures are given every year in honour of the poet and scholar F.T. Prince, who was one of Southampton’s first English professors. Invited speakers explore new directions in literary studies, drawing on the English department’s wide range of intellectual interests.

Previous speakers have included Daljit Nagra, Christopher Ricks, Simon Gikandi, and Michael Davidson.

The event will also see the launch of Reading F.T. Prince, a new collection of essays exploring Prince's legacy edited by Will May.

Professor Isobel Armstrong - 'Reading Women's Experimental Poetry'

This lecture speculates on new models of writing and reading poetry that deliberately move away from expectations of what a poem is. Sometimes termed a parallel tradition, this poetry is forging new terms. Women are particularly strong in this movement, including Carol Watts, Andrea Brady and Caroline Bergvall.

Black and White Portrait photo of Professor Isobel Armstrong
Professor Isobel Armstrong

Isobel Armstrong is a fellow of the British Academy, Senior Research Fellow of the Institute of English Studies and Professor Emeritus at the University of Birkbeck. She was a Professor in the English department at Southampton from 1979-89. Her works include Victorian Poetry: Poetry, Poetics and Politics (1993), Victorian Glass Worlds: Glass culture and the imagination 1830-1880 (2008), The Radical Aesthetic (2000), and Novel Politics: Democratic Imaginations in Nineteenth-Century Fiction (2017).

The lecture will be chaired by Professor Mary Hammond, Chair of English and Book History at the University of Southampton. There will be a drinks reception following the lecture hosted by the Southampton Centre for Nineteenth-Century Research.

 

 

 

This lecture will be livestreamed and recorded, to watch please follow this link.

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