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The University of Southampton
Engineering

Research project: Development of advanced non-destructive damage detection approach using vibrational power flow

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Detection of damages in engineering structures is very important in maritime, aero, mechanical, and civil engineering fields. Identification of damage location is crucial for damage repair and control. Recently, more attention is being paid to non-destructive damage detection techniques. The energy flow-based dynamical damage detection strategy is a novel topic in this field. This research project will develop a new non-destructive damage detection approach using our developed power flow mode theory and power flow analysis method for vibrating structures with damages. It is aimed to detect damage non-destructively, accurately, reliably and to control damage deterioration in order to increase the safety, extend the working life and reduce the maintenance cost of engineering structures.

Project Overview

Non-destructive evaluation technologies have been the focus of significant development efforts for applications to a broad spectrum of transportation and civil structural systems. Marine structures experience a variety of operational cyclic loading conditions that can lead to critical fatigue-induced cracks.

Power flow is a more desirable quantity for use in damage detections because power flow is a better performance descriptor. Power flow mode and energy distribution pattern in damaged structures will be analysed. The vibrational power flow based structural damage detection approach, numerical programme and techniques will be developed to detect and locate damages. It is aimed to detect damage non-destructively, accurately, reliably and to control damage deterioration in order to increase the safety, extend the working life and reduce the maintenance cost of engineering structures.

Associated research themes

Structures and Solid Mechanics

Related research groups

Fluid Structure Interactions

Staff

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