Skip to main navigationSkip to main content
The University of Southampton
Southampton Marine and Maritime Institute

Southampton professor calls for harder choices to be made on climate change adaptation

Published: 27 November 2012Origin: Engineering

Uncertainty about how much the climate is changing is not a reason to delay preparing for the harmful impacts of climate change says Professor Robert Nicholls of the University of Southampton and colleagues at the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research, writing today in Nature Climate Change.

The costs of adapting to climate change, sea-level and flooding include the upfront expenses of upgrading infrastructure, installing early-warning systems, and effective organisations, as well as the costs of reducing risk, such as not building on flood plains.

Robert Nicholls, Professor of Coastal Engineering at the University of Southampton and the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research, says: "Some impacts of climate change are now inevitable, so it is widely agreed that we must adapt. But selecting and funding adaptation remains a challenge."

Professor Nicholls and his co-authors describe two ways of assessing how much adaptation to climate change is enough by balancing the risk of climate change against the cost of adaptation. First they describe cost-benefit analysis where the cost of the adaptation has to be less than the benefit of risk reduction. Alternatively, decision makers can seek the most cost-effective way of maintaining a tolerable level of risk. This approach is easier for policymakers to understand, but thresholds of tolerable risk from climate change are not well defined.

The Thames Estuary Gateway is the only place in the UK where a level of protection against flooding is defined in law - a 1 in 1000 year standard of protection which needs to be maintained with rising sea levels. The authors conclude that adaptation decisions need exploration across a variety of different interpretations of risk, not a single answer.

"Adaptation decisions have further benefits. The tenfold increase in the Netherlands standard of flood protection proposed in 2008 has sent a message to global business that the Netherlands will be open in the future, come what may," adds Professor Nicholls.

The research article ‘Proportionate adaptation' by Professor Jim Hall (Oxford University), Dr Sally Brown (University of Southampton), Professor Robert Nicholls (University of Southampton), Professor Nick Pidgeon (Cardiff University) and Professor Robert Watson (University of East Anglia) is published in Nature Climate Change December 2012. All of the authors are members of the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research.

Related Staff Member

3 December 2019

Southampton Dean calls for blurring of eng...

Professor Bashir Al-Hashimi has appealed for the UK to immediately ...

Read More
22 November 2019

Southampton Formula Student racers secure ...

Southampton University Formula Student Team (SUFST) has been named ...

Read More
13 November 2019

Global experts join forces to meet acceler...

Dozens of highly-skilled engineers are being trained to address the...

Read More

Notes for editors

For further information contact:
 
Glenn Harris, Media Relations, University of Southampton, Tel: 023 8059 3212 email: G.Harris@soton.ac.uk  
 
www.soton.ac.uk/mediacentre/

Privacy Settings