The University of Southampton
Humanities

QV32 BA English and History (with Year Abroad) (4 years)

‘You read widely, have a fascination with the past and enjoy the challenge of interpretation. English and History at Southampton offers you the opportunity to think about literature and history in absorbing and productive ways’.

Introducing your degree

A BA English and History (with Year Abroad) degree provides the opportunity to study abroad as part of our Erasmus exchange programme or our ‘Year abroad’ programme. Study important periods in history, get introduced to a number of fictional proses and analyse a variety of narrative techniques. Careers in teaching, archiving, curating, the media, law and publishing are possible for graduates of this degree course.

Overview

Programme Structure

View the programme specification document for this course

Key Facts

We possess many collections of original historical documents, including the Wellington, Palmerston and Mountbatten papers and the Parkes Archives

 

Entry Requirements

Typical entry requirements

A Levels:
QualificationGrade
GCE A-level

AAB including Grades AB in English Literature (or a related subject*) and History (or a related subject*).

Applicants taking the Extended Project Qualification (EPQ) will also be made an alternative offer one grade below the standard offer, conditional on an A grade in the EPQ.

We accept all A levels except General Studies.

IB:
QualificationGrade
International Baccalaureate34 points, 17 at higher level, including 6 in higher level English Literature (or a related subject*) and History (or a related subject*)  

*A English literature related subject includes History, English Language and Literature, English Language, or Drama and Theatre Studies. A History related subject includes subjects such as English, Philosophy, Religious Studies or Classical Civilisation or other humanities based essay writing subjects. We may interview students without a Literature component in their A levels, due to the literary emphasis of our degree programmes.

International applications

We welcome applications from international students. Helpful information on applying, meeting a University representative in your country, or improving your English language levels can be found on the International Office website. If English is not your first language you will be required to pass an approved English test. We normally ask for an overall IELTS score of 7.0 with not less than 7.0 in Reading and Writing, 6.5 in Listening and Speaking.

Alternative qualifications

We welcome applications from candidates offering qualifications other than A and AS levels (including BTEC, European Baccalaureate, International Baccalaureate, Irish Leaving Certificate and Scottish Highers). You will be expected to attain an equivalent standard in other qualifications approved by the University to an A level applicant. Contact us for further information on equivalencies for these qualifications and others not listed here.

Contextual Offers

 

The University of Southampton is committed to widening participation and ensuring that all students with the potential to succeed, regardless of their background, are encouraged to apply to study with us. The additional information gained through contextual data supports our admissions teams to recognise a student’s potential to succeed in the context of their background and experience. Students who flagged in this way will be made an offer which is lower than the typical offer for that programme.

A typical contextual offer is ABB from three A levels including Grades AB in English Literature (or a related subject*) and History (or a related subject*) or an equivalent standard in other qualifications approved by the University.

Please see our contextual admission pages for more information. 

 

Selection process:
Intake:
200
Average applications per place:
8

Selection is normally based on actual or predicted grades plus the reference and personal statement on your UCAS application. Exceptionally we may ask you to come for an interview before making an offer.

This page contains specific entry requirements for this course. Find out about equivalent entry requirements and qualifications for your country.

Modules

Typical course content

Innovation modules outside of your subject area

Our Curriculum Innovation Programme offers you the chance to take optional modules outside of your chosen subject area. This allows you to personalise your education, to develop new skills and knowledge for your future. Modules range from "Living and working on the web" to "Business skills for employability".

View the Curriculum Innovation modules for this course

Learn a language

Some of our courses also give you the option of taking a language module, which can count towards your degree. These modules cover ten languages and range from absolute beginner to near-native speaker level.

View the language modules on offer for this course

Year 1

The following is an indicative list of available optional modules, which are subject to change each academic year. Please note in some instances modules have limited spaces available.

ENGLISH:  Students must take a minimum of one module in semester one, normally the double module ENGL1007 Narrative and Culture, and one compulsory double module in semester two.  However, those wishing to take an alternative subject may replace Narrative and Culture with ENGL1004 Poetic Language OR ENGL1085 Multimedia Old English, plus their chosen 15 credit alternative module in semester two.

Semester One

Narrative and Culture may be replaced with an alternative single module from another discipline PLUS ENGL1004 Poetic Language OR ENGL1085 Multimedia Old English.

Compulsory
HIST1151
World Histories: Contact, Conflict and Culture from Ancient to Modern
Optional
ENGL1004
Poetic Language
ENGL1007
Narrative and Culture
ENGL1085
Multimedia Old English: Song, Skin and Cyberspace

Year 2

The following is an indicative list of available optional modules, which are subject to change each academic year. Please note in some instances modules have limited spaces available.

Semester One

English: Students normally choose either one double OR two single English modules

History: Students normally choose one double history module

You may, if you wish, replace one optional, 15 credit, single module in each semester with an alternative subject.  One of these will replace the equivalent credits in English, the other the equivalent credits in History.

Optional
ENGL2005
Romanticism
ENGL2027
Children's Literature
ENGL2029
Modern Drama since World War II
ENGL2034
Themes in Mid-Nineteenth Century American Literature
ENGL2046
Images of Africa in Literature and Culture
ENGL2051
Objects of Desire
ENGL2058
Literatures of Islands and Oceans
ENGL2069
Film Adaptation: Culture and Context
ENGL2073
Visions of Beowulf: new encounters with Anglo-Saxon culture
ENGL2077
Money and Meaning in American Fiction
ENGL2079
Contemporary Women’s Writing
ENGL2080
Queens, Devils and Players in Early Modern England
ENGL2083
Tales of Travel c.1000-1650: Idylls, Utopias, Monsters, and Cannibals
ENGL2084
The Figure of the Child in Literature, Film and Culture
ENGL2085
The Enlightenment Body
ENGL2091
From Black and White to Colour: A Screen History of ‘Race’, Gender and Sexuality in Post-War Britain
ENGL2092
Women Writers Remixed ca. 1850—1915
FILM2006
Introduction to Film Studies (Film module for non-Film Students)
HIST2003
Power, Patronage and Politics in Early-Modern England, 1509-1649
HIST2006
Looking Beyond the Holocaust: The Impact of Genocide on Contemporary History
HIST2027
Peasants Lords and Merchants in Medieval Britain
HIST2035
The Struggle of the Czechs: From Serfdom to Stalinism
HIST2036
The Hundred Years War: Britain and Europe, 1259-1453
HIST2045
Cleopatra's Egypt
HIST2049
Sin and Society, 1100 - 1520
HIST2051
The British Atlantic World, 1600 - 1800
HIST2055
The Eternal City: The City of Rome, from Foundation to 200 AD
HIST2064
The Space Age
HIST2077
The British and their Countryside in the Twentieth Century
HIST2085
Rebels with a Cause: The Historical Origins of Christianity
HIST2086
Building London 1666 – 2012
HIST2087
Islamism – from the 1980s to the present
HIST2091
Underworlds. A cultural history of urban nightlife in the 19th and 20th centuries
HIST2094
Wellington and the war against Napoleon
HIST2096
Evolution of US Counterterrorism
HIST2098
A Medieval World Empire in Africa: Ethiopia
Semester Two
Optional
ENGL2010
Postcolonial Texts and Contexts
ENGL2011
Women, Writing and Modernity, 1770-1820
ENGL2013
Writing Rural England
ENGL2061
19th Century Novel
ENGL2063
Problems in Shakespeare: Text, Print and Performance
ENGL2074
Change and the English Countryside in the 19th Century
ENGL2075
Brief Encounters: Writing Short Stories
ENGL2078
Scriptwriting
ENGL2078
Scriptwriting
ENGL2088
British Culture in the 1980s’
ENGL2089
Poems, Books and Anthologies
ENGL2093
Contemporary Fiction and Visual Culture
ENGL2094
Victorian Feelings
ENGL2095
Patriots and Cosmopolitans: African modes of belonging
ENGL2096
Making New York Modern
HIST2003
Power, Patronage and Politics in Early-Modern England, 1509-1649
HIST2004
The Making of Englishness: Race, Ethnicity and Immigration in British Society, 1841 to the Present
HIST2031
Stalin and Stalinism
HIST2039
Imperialism and Nationalism in British India
HIST2053
Habsburg Spain, 1471-1700: The Rise and Decline of the First European Superpower
HIST2065
Aristocracy to democracy? Political change in 19th century Britain
HIST2071
Celebrity, Media and Mass Culture, Britain 1888-1952
HIST2072
Treason and Plot: A History of Modern Treason in Europe
HIST2073
Jews in Germany before the Holocaust
HIST2076
The First British Empire: the beginnings of English dominance, 1050-1300
HIST2082
Nelson Mandela: A South African life
HIST2084
Accommodation, Violence and Networks in Colonial America
HIST2090
Britain's Global Empire, 1750-1870
HIST2093
Strategy and War
HIST2097
Napoleon and his legend
HIST2099
Early Modern Aliens: Immigration and its Discontents in History and Literature
HIST2100
Retail Therapy
HIST2102
Discipline and Punish: Prisons and Prisoners in England 1775 - 1898
HIST2103
Self-inflicted - Extreme Violence, Politics and Power

Year 3

Your third year will be spent at one our partner institutions. More details can be found here: http://www.southampton.ac.uk/international/study_exchange/about/partners_by_acac_disc.html

Year 4

The following is an indicative list of available optional modules, which are subject to change each academic year. Please note in some instances modules have limited spaces available.

Semester One

History dissertation students should take a HIST Special Subject part 1 (double module) or HIST Alternative History (double module) plus two English single modules OR, alternatively, HIST Special Subject part 1 (double module) or HIST Alternative History (double module) and one English double module.

English dissertation students should take a HIST Special Subject part 1 (double module) and either one English double module or two English single module.

You may, if you wish, replace one optional, 15 credit, single module in each semester with an alternative subject.  One of these will replace the equivalent credits in English, the other the equivalent credits in History.

Optional
ENGL3003
Rakes and Libertines
ENGL3004
Writing the Novel
ENGL3015
Fantasy Film and Fiction
ENGL3027
Writing Modern Ireland
ENGL3047
Literature and Visual Culture in the Middle East
ENGL3056
Victorian Bestsellers
ENGL3064
Images of Africa in Literature and Culture
ENGL3066
Themes in Mid-19thC American Writing
ENGL3069
Love and Death in Africa’s Cities
ENGL3074
Writing Place
ENGL3076
The Figure of the Child in Literature, Film and Culture
ENGL3078
Queens, Devils and Players in Early Modern England
ENGL3079
Visions of Beowulf: New Encounters with Anglo-Saxon Culture
ENGL3086
Eve and the Angels: Love, War, and the End of Epic in Milton’s Paradise Lost
HIST3036
France under the Nazis, 1940-1944 (Part 1)
HIST3042
From Tyranny to Revolution: England, 1625-49. Part 1
HIST3060
The Holocaust: Policy, Responses and Aftermath. Part 1
HIST3066
The Henrician Reformation 1509-47. Part 1
HIST3069
The Vietnam War in American History and Memory. Part 1.
HIST3075
Crime and Punishment in England c. 1688-1840
HIST3104
Refugees in the Twentieth Century. Part 1.
HIST3113
Modern Israel 1948-2007 part 1
HIST3116
Alternative Histories: Between Private Memory and Public History.
HIST3118
Food, Politics and Hunger
HIST3119
Alternative Histories: Music and History
HIST3121
Alternative Sexualities
HIST3123
Slavery and Freedom in the British Caribbean
HIST3130
Medieval Love, Sex and Marriage. Part 1
HIST3132
Conflict, Transformation and Resurgence in Asia: 1800 to the present
HIST3133
Heresy and Inquisition in the Early Modern Iberian World. Part 1.
HIST3148
Alternative Histories: Cultures of Migration
HIST3150
Alternative Histories: Travellers' Tales
HIST3157
Hidden and forbidden, religious lives east of Rome (Part 1)
HIST3163
The Long Life of the Indian Mutiny 1857-58: Event, Metaphor, Memory. Part 1
HIST3171
Loyalty and Treason in the Habsburg Monarchy 1
HIST3173
The Wars of the Roses - Part I
HIST3186
Alternative Conquests: Comparisons and Contrasts
HIST3187
The Bible and History
HIST3197
America: From Revolution to Republic: Part I
HIST3199
Being Roman Part I: society and the individual in Rome and Italy
HIST3201
A History of Care and Cure - Part I
HIST3203
The American Empire: Part I
HIST3205
World War 2: The Home Front - Part 1
HIST3207
World War II: The Global Perspective - Part I
HUMA3009
Humanities Undergraduate Ambassador Scheme Yr3
HUMA3011
Narrative Non-Fiction: The Interdisciplinary Art
Semester Two
Optional
ENGL3002
Gender and Nationalism
ENGL3007
Holocaust Literature
ENGL3027
Writing Modern Ireland
ENGL3039
Sweatshops, Sex Workers & Asylum Seekers: World Literature and Visual Culture after Globalisation
ENGL3044
Poems, Books and Anthologies
ENGL3049
Creative Writing in Schools
ENGL3058
Radical England: From Shakespeare to Milton
ENGL3068
Making Medieval Place
ENGL3069
Love and Death in Africa’s Cities
ENGL3072
Writing Rural England
ENGL3076
The Figure of the Child in Literature, Film and Culture
ENGL3080
Images of Women 1890-1939
ENGL3081
Money and Meaning in American Fiction
ENGL3083
Representing a New Republic: Writing the Early United States
ENGL3085
The ‘Invention’ of English Literature, 1380–1720
HIST3038
France under the Nazis, 1940-1944 (Part 2)
HIST3043
From Tyranny to Revolution: England, 1625-49. Part 2
HIST3061
The Holocaust: Policy, Responses and Aftermath. Part 2
HIST3067
The Henrician Reformation 1509-47. Part 2
HIST3070
The Vietnam War in American Memory and History. Part 2.
HIST3076
Crime and Punishment in England c. 1688 - 1840
HIST3105
Refugees in the Twentieth Century. Part 2.
HIST3108
The 1947 Partition of India and its Aftermath. Part 2.
HIST3114
Modern Israel 1948-2007 pt2
HIST3131
Medieval Love, Sex and Marriage. Part 2
HIST3134
Heresy and Inquisition in the Early Modern Iberian World. Part 2.
HIST3166
Loyalty and Treason in the Habsburg Monarchy 2
HIST3168
The Long Life of the Indian Mutiny (1857-58): Event, Metaphor, Memory - Part 2
HIST3174
The Wars of the Roses - Part II
HIST3198
America: From Revolution to Republic - Part II
HIST3200
Being Roman Part II: Ethnicity, Culture and Empire
HIST3202
A History of Care and Cure - Part II
HIST3204
The American Empire: Part II
HIST3206
World War 2: The Home Front - Part 2
HIST3208
World War II: The Global Perspective - Part II

Please note: This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if s/he takes full advantage of the learning opportunities that are provided. More detailed information can be found in the programme handbook (or other appropriate guide or website).

Fees & funding

Tuition fees

Course fees for 2017/18 full-time UK and EU undergraduate students are typically £9,250 per year. Tuition fees for international students differ between each course. Most part-time courses cost 50% of the full-time fee.

View the full list of course fees

Funding

Scholarships, bursaries or grants may be available to support you through your course. Funding opportunities available to you are linked to your subject area and/or your country of origin. These can be from the University of Southampton or other sources.

Explore funding opportunities

Costs associated with this course

Students are responsible for meeting the cost of essential textbooks, and of producing such essays, assignments, laboratory reports and dissertations as are required to fulfil the academic requirements for each programme of study.

There will also be further costs for the following, not purchasable from the University:

TypeDescription
StationeryYou will be expected to provide your own day-to-day stationery items, e.g. pens, pencils, notebooks, etc. Any specialist stationery items will be specified under the Additional Costs tab of the relevant module profile.
BooksWhere a module specifies core texts these should generally be available on the reserve list in the library. However due to demand, students may prefer to buy their own copies. These can be purchased from any source. Some modules suggest reading texts as optional background reading. The library may hold copies of such texts, or alternatively you may wish to purchase your own copies. Although not essential reading, you may benefit from the additional reading materials for the module.
EquipmentIT - Computer discs or USB drives: Students are expected to provide their own portable data storage device.
EquipmentIT - Software licenses: All software is provided.
EquipmentIT - Hardware: It is advisable that students provide their own laptop or personal computer, although shared facilities are available across the University campus.
Printing and copyingWhere possible, coursework such as essays; projects; dissertations is likely to be submitted on line. However, there are some items where it is not possible to submit on line and students will be asked to provide a printed copy. The University printing costs are currently: A4 - 5p per side (black and white) or 25p per side (colour) A3 - 10p per side (black and white) or 50p per side (colour) Please Note: Paper sizes not recognised by the printing devices will prompt you to select the size and then charge a minimum of 50p per black and white copy and a maximum of £1 per colour copy. You can pay for your printing by using the money loaders or by using print copy payment service by going to http://www.southampton.ac.uk/isolutions/students/printing-for-students.page Please remember that we are unable to refund any credit that has not been used by the end of your course, so please consider this when topping up your printing/copy account The University Print Centre also offers a printing and copying service as well as a dissertation/binding service.
PlacementsStudents on placement programmes can expect to cover costs for health and travel insurance, accommodation and living expenses, travel costs and visa costs. This will vary depending on which country you are travelling to. Specific details on what additional costs there will be are detailed in the individual module profiles which can be found under the modules tab of the programme details of your programme.

In some cases you'll be able to choose modules (which may have different costs associated with that module) which will change the overall cost of a programme to you. Please also ensure you read the section on additional costs in the University’s Fees, Charges and Expenses Regulations in the University Calendar available at www.calendar.soton.ac.uk.

Career Opportunities

Studying English and History at Southampton will help you acquire high-level critical thinking and communication skills that are essential to navigate your career. Our English and History graduates have progressed to careers in journalism, archiving, publishing, curating, management and administration, teaching, the media, law, creative writing, and many other areas.

You will be developing and practising the skills required for a successful career from day one of the course. Over three years you will learn to

  • write in different ways and for different formats
  • sharpen your analysis of the past to address the problems of the present
  • argue your case
  • make interesting and confident presentations
  • work effectively both on your own and in groups
  • identify and research areas that you think are important

These are all skills that are valued not just by us but by employers. As a student rep you might also take an active role in the governance of the department, of a student society, or of the Students' Union. English and History also offers some opportunities for direct work experience.

  • Find out more on our Careers and Employability on our English and History pages
  • Learn about the experience gained by our graduates during their time with us on the Alumni pages of our English and History websites
  • Read interesting employability facts about our English degrees on our Employability Facts and Figures pages on the English and History websites

Learning & Assessment

An English and History degree at Southampton provides you with an excellent education in literature, theory and past cultures. There are opportunities for field research, creative writing, as well as work experience in local schools. We are committed to providing a rich, rigorous, and above all enjoyable experience ensuring that you graduate as a confident, curious and independent self-starter equipped with the skills for a successful career.

  • Research-led teaching by English and History academics who are passionate about their subject
  • Talks by visiting speakers from international universities and by successful professionals
  • Specialist online learning resources for every module
  • An exciting range of assessment methods including presentations, group projects, portfolios, and dissertations, as well as essays and exams
  • An academic advisor to provide regular and supportive advice, guidance and feedback on your progress
  • Opportunities to visit Chawton House Library and the former home of Jane Austen, as well as visits to galleries, museums, and theatres
  • Access to the Wellington, Palmerston and Mountbatten papers and the Parkes archives
  • Opportunities to spend a semester, a year or a summer at one of our international partner universities in Asia, Europe, and the Americas to experience a new culture
  • Placements in schools and colleges as part of your degree such as international writing in schools, and the student associates scheme

 

Study Locations

Student life

Avenue campus

Only a few minutes walk from Highfield Campus, Avenue campus provides ...Find out more

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