The University of Southampton
Warning! Your browser is out-of-date and not compatible with this website. Please download a new secure and faster browser to view this website correctly.
Humanities

VV51 BA Philosophy and History (3 yrs)

Introducing your degree

A Philosophy and History degree at Southampton provides you with an excellent and rigorous education exploring the events and ideas which have shaped, and continue to shape, the world around us. During the BA in Philosophy and History at Southampton you will gain an in-depth knowledge of core issues within philosophy and history while also pursuing your own interests through optional modules.

Your time here will be rich, stimulating and enjoyable, and you will graduate as an independently-minded, confident individual with the skills required for a successful career.

Programme Overview

What is this?(More Information)This information is based on historical data and may have been aggregated. Find out more.

Programme Structure

Over each year, you must take eight modules, or the equivalent, including at least three modules in each subject. You take four modules each semester.

Our Curriculum Innovation Programme offers our students the chance to take optional modules outside their core disciplines.  This allows you to personalise your education, to develop new skills and knowledge for your future.

In your final year you will consolidate your knowledge and skills as a philosopher and historian by completing a dissertation on a topic of your choice in either of your main subjects.

View the programme specification document for this course

Key Facts

  • An unusually wide range of courses, with much of our teaching conducted in genuinely small groups.
  • We teach in many fields of history rarely taught in most other UK universities, such as East and Central European history, South East Asian history and Jewish history.
  • Philosophy at Southampton was ranked second in the UK for graduate prospects by the Times Good University Guide 2014.
  • You can spend a period studying abroad at one of our partner institutions across the world.

Did you know?

You can take this programme with a year abroad at one of our 173 partner institutions in over 24 countries – use code VV52 when you apply through UCAS.

Virtual Open Day
Step into our world and explore from anywhere
Southampton City Video
Watch our film about the city

Entry Requirements

Typical entry requirements

A Levels:
QualificationGrade
GCE A-level

AAB or ABB including History or a related subject*.

Applicants taking the Extended Project Qualification (EPQ) will also be made an alternative offer one grade below the standard offer, conditional on an A grade in the EPQ.

We accept all A levels except General Studies.

IB:
QualificationGrade
International Baccalaureate34 or 32 points overall, 17 or 16 at higher level including 6 in higher level history (or related subject*) *Related subject includes subjects such as English, Philosophy, Religious Studies or Classical Civilisation or other humanities based essay writing subjects. Students applying without History will need to make a case in their personal statement.
International applications

We welcome applications from international students. Helpful information on applying, meeting a University representative in your country, or improving your English language levels can be found on the International Office website. If English is not your first language you will be required to pass an approved English test. We normally ask for an overall IELTS score of 6.5 with not less than 6.5 in Reading and Writing, 6.0 in Listening and Speaking

Alternative qualifications

We welcome applications from candidates offering qualifications other than A and AS levels (including BTEC, European Baccalaureate, International Baccalaureate, Irish Leaving Certificate and Scottish Highers). You will be expected to attain an equivalent standard to an A level applicant. Contact us for further information on equivalencies for these qualifications and others not listed here.

Contextual Offers

Humanities supports contextual admission.  A typical offer for an applicant qualifying as contextual is BBB from 3 A levels or the equivalent from alternative qualifications.

Selection process:
Intake:
75
Average applications per place:
6

Selection is normally based on actual or predicted grades plus the reference and personal statement on your UCAS application. Exceptionally we may ask you to come for an interview before making an offer.

This page contains specific entry requirements for this course. Find out about equivalent entry requirements and qualifications for your country.

Modules

Typical course content

Over each year, you must take eight modules, or the equivalent, including at least three modules in each subject. You take four modules each semester.

You may take up to two optional modules from outside your degree subjects.  This allows you to personalise your education, to develop new skills and knowledge for your future.

Innovation modules outside of your subject area

Our Curriculum Innovation Programme offers you the chance to take optional modules outside of your chosen subject area. This allows you to personalise your education, to develop new skills and knowledge for your future. Modules range from "Living and working on the web" to "Business skills for employability".  

View the Curriculum Innovation modules for this course

Learn a language

Some of our courses also give you the option of taking a language module, which can count towards your degree. These modules cover ten languages and range from absolute beginner to near-native speaker level.

View the language modules on offer for this course

Year 1

Year 2

You must take at least three Philosophy modules and three History modules across the year.  One of the History modules must be a pre-1750 course.

Year 3

You must do a dissertation in either Philosophy or History.  If doing a Philosophy dissertation you must do a History Special Subject module in each semester.  If doing a History dissertation you must do either a History Special Subject module or an Alternative History module in Semester 1.

Semester One

Optional
PHIL3013
Dissertation
HIST3021
History Dissertation
HIST3036
France under the Nazis, 1940-1944 (Part 1)
HIST3054
The Third Reich. Part 1
HIST3060
The Holocaust: Policy, Responses and Aftermath. Part 1
HIST3069
The Vietnam War in American History and Memory. Part 1.
HIST3072
Society and Culture in the Late Russian Empire, 1881-1917. Part 1
HIST3075
Crime and Punishment in England c. 1688-1840
HIST3104
Refugees in the Twentieth Century. Part 1.
HIST3113
Modern Israel 1948-2007 part 1
HIST3116
Alternative Histories: Between Private Memory and Public History.
HIST3118
Alternative Histories: Food and Cooking
HIST3119
Alternative Histories: Music and History
HIST3121
Alternative Sexualities
HIST3126
Fashioning the Tudor Court. Part 1.
HIST3132
Conflict, Transformation and Resurgence in Asia: 1800 to the present
HIST3148
Alternative Histories: Cultures of Migration
HIST3150
Alternative Histories: Travellers' Tales
HIST3157
Hidden and forbidden, religious lives east of Rome (Part 1)
HIST3173
The Wars of the Roses - Part I
HIST3176
Forging the Raj: The East India Company and Britain's Asian World, 1
HIST3178
When the Lights Went Out: Britain in the 1970s, Part 1: 1970-1974
HIST3180
The rise and fall of the British Empire in Africa: Conquest, colony, and rebellion, 1900-60, part 1
HIST3184
'All manner of men, … working and wandering as the world asks': daily life in England in the later Middle Ages (Part 1)
HIST3186
Alternative Conquests: Comparisons and Contrasts
HIST3187
The Bible and History
HIST3199
Being Roman Part I: society and the individual in Rome and Italy
HIST3205
World War 2: The Home Front - Part 1
HIST3207
World War II: The Global Perspective - Part I
HIST3216
Racism in the United States Part 1
HIST3212
Love and sexuality in Twentieth Century Europe, Part 1
HIST3214
Iran Between Revolutions (1907-1979): From Constitutionalism to Clericalism (1)
HIST3218
Nuclear War and Peace, Part I
HIST3220
Alternative histories: Homes and houses: challenging the domestic
PHIL3007
Nietzsche
PHIL3009
Heidegger
PHIL3020
Philosophy of Mathematics
PHIL3036
Self-knowledge
PHIL3037
Wittgenstein's Later Philosophy
HUMA3009
Humanities Undergraduate Ambassador Scheme Yr3
Semester Two
Optional
HIST3038
France under the Nazis, 1940-1944 (Part 2)
HIST3055
The Third Reich. Part 2
HIST3061
The Holocaust: Policy, Responses and Aftermath. Part 2
HIST3070
The Vietnam War in American Memory and History. Part 2.
HIST3073
The Late Russian Empire: Society, Ethnicity and Culture. Part 2
HIST3076
Crime and Punishment in England c. 1688 - 1840
HIST3105
Refugees in the Twentieth Century. Part 2.
HIST3114
Modern Israel 1948-2007 pt2
HIST3127
Fashioning the Tudor Court. Part 2.
HIST3158
Hidden and Forbidden, religious lives east of Rome (part 2)
HIST3174
The Wars of the Roses - Part II
HIST3177
Forging the Raj: the East India Company and Britain's Asian World, 2
HIST3179
When the Lights Went Out: Britain in the 1970s, Part 2: 1974-1979
HIST3181
The rise and fall of the British Empire in Africa: Conquest, colony, and rebellion, 1900-60, part 2
HIST3185
'All manner of men, … working and wandering as the world asks': daily life in England in the later Middle Ages (Part 2)
HIST3200
Being Roman Part II: Ethnicity, Culture and Empire
HIST3206
World War 2: The Home Front - Part 2
HIST3208
World War II: The Global Perspective - Part II
HIST3213
Love and sexuality in Twentieth Century Europe, part 2
HIST3215
Iran Between Revolutions (1907-1979): From Constitutionalism to Clericalism (2)
HIST3217
Racism in the United States part 2
HIST3219
Nuclear War and Peace, Part II
PHIL3009
Heidegger
PHIL3011
Kierkegaard
PHIL3035
Action, Reason and Ethics
PHIL3038
The Ethics of Belief
PHIL3041
Happiness and Wellbeing
PHIL3042
Fiction and Fictionalism

Please note: This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if s/he takes full advantage of the learning opportunities that are provided. More detailed information can be found in the programme handbook (or other appropriate guide or website).

Career Opportunities

What can you do with a Philosophy and History degree? Almost anything! That's because Philosophy and History teach you not what to think, but how to think. This is, as a Times report on Philosophy put it, "the ultimate transferable work skill".

Our students have gone on to succeed in a dazzling range of careers, including business, law, medicine, journalism, teaching, IT, the civil service, advertising, film and television, and finance. The 2013 Destination of Leavers of Higher Education (DLHE) survey found that 90% of our Philosophy graduates were in work or study six months after finishing their degree, with 80% of those in full-time employment occupying professional or managerial roles. You can find out more about some of our graduates on our ‘Alumni: Where are they now?' page for Philosophy and History.

During your degree you will learn skills such as:

  • Critical thinking
  • Analysis
  • Clear oral and written communication
  • Mental agility
  • The ability to appreciate different points of view
  • Working in groups

Don't just take our word for it. In a survey of results in the American GRE tests (tests of verbal, quantitative and analytical skills), Philosophy graduates achieved better average scores than graduates of any other humanities or social science subject.

Career skills are embedded throughout every stage of our course and are developed at every moment of study. Certain modules offer specific teaching in reasoning and communications skills. In addition, there are work experience opportunities to help you understand how your transferable skills apply in the workplace. The university's Excel placement scheme offers around 150 Christmas, Easter and summer placements in a range of companies.

Learning & Assessment

Combine pleasure with learning
Combine pleasure with learning

Our teaching draws upon the cutting-edge research of Southampton's academics, all of whom are actively engaged in presenting and publishing their work in philosophy and history to international audiences.

We place special emphasis on small group teaching. Alongside lectures, you will participate from your first year of study in tutorials and seminars in which you will explore and develop your own ideas in discussion with fellow students and staff.

You will be assessed by more than just essays and exams. Depending on the modules you choose, you will work in teams, give presentations, submit group projects, develop websites, and manage larger research projects such as dissertations.

Each student is assigned a personal academic tutor, a leading academic who provides help and support at every stage of study.

Throughout your degree, we impart advanced skills in reasoning, research, communication, and analysis, skills which, alongside the support offered by the University's career service, will prepare you for further study or a future career.

Costs

Costs associated with this course

Students are responsible for meeting the cost of essential textbooks, and of producing such essays, assignments, laboratory reports and dissertations as are required to fulfil the academic requirements for each programme of study.

There will also be further costs for the following, not purchasable from the University:

TypeDescription
StationeryYou will be expected to provide your own day-to-day stationary items, e.g. pens, pencils, notebooks, etc.).
BooksWhere a module specifies core texts these should generally be available on the reserve list in the library. However due to demand, students may prefer to buy their own copies. These can be purchased from any source. Some modules suggest reading texts as optional background reading. The library may hold copies of such texts, or alternatively you may wish to purchase your own copies. Although not essential reading, you may benefit from the additional reading materials for the module.
EquipmentLaboratory Equipment and Materials: All laboratory equipment and materials are provided. IT Computer Discs or USB drives: Students are expected to provide their own portable data storage device. Software Licenses: All software is provided. Hardware: It is advisable that students provide their own laptop or personal computer, although shared facilities are available across the University campus.
Printing and copyingWhere possible, coursework such as essays; projects; dissertations is likely to be submitted on line. However, there are some items where it is not possible to submit on line and students will be asked to provide a printed copy. The University printing costs are currently: A4 - 5p per side (black and white) or 25p per side (colour) A3 - 10p per side (black and white) or 50p per side (colour). Please Note: Paper sizes not recognised by the printing devices will prompt you to select the size and then charge a minimum of 50p per black and white copy and a maximum of £1 per colour copy. You can pay for your printing by using the money loaders or by using print copy payment service by going to www.printcopypayments.soton.ac.uk Please remember that we are unable to refund any credit that has not been used by the end of your course, so please consider this when topping up your printing/copy account. You will be given a printing allowance of £1 per 7.5 ECTS ARCH towards the costs of printing lecture handouts and/or practical scripts. The University Print Centre also offers a printing and copying service as well as a dissertation/binding service. Current printing and copying costs can be found here: http://www.southampton.ac.uk/printcentre/copyrooms/service.page. They also provide a large format printing service, e.g. Academic posters. Details of current costs can be found here: http://www.southampton.ac.uk/printcentre/exhibition/academicposters.page?
PlacementsStudents on placement programmes can expect to cover costs for health and travel insurance, accommodation and living expenses; travel costs; visa costs. This will vary depending on which country you are travelling to. Specific details on what additional costs there will be are detailed in the individual module profiles which can be found under the modules tab of the programme details of your programme.

In some cases you'll be able to choose modules (which may have different costs associated with that module) which will change the overall cost of a programme to you. Please also ensure you read the section on additional costs in the University’s Fees, Charges and Expenses Regulations in the University Calendar available at www.calendar.soton.ac.uk.

Study Locations

Related Courses

Share this courseFacebookGoogle+TwitterWeibo

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×