The University of Southampton
Engineering and the Environment

Research project: Size matters: x-ray computed tomography for dimensional metrology

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The efficient measurement of the shape and size of industrial components is a fundamental requirement for many performance and safety critical industries, from aerospace engineering to renewable energy production and defense. The use of x-ray computed tomography (XCT) for dimensional measurement is a relatively recent innovation. This is driven partly by the advent of ever more advanced manufacturing processes such as 3D printing, which increasingly allow the design and manufacture of components with extremely complex shapes and internal parts.

Project Overview

225kVX-TEK/Nikon Metrology HMXST
225kVX-TEK/Nikon Metrology HMXST
XCT for metrology

XCT systems are extremely complex with measurement uncertainty associated to several key components, including the x-ray source, the mechanical system that positions and move the test piece, the x-ray detector and the reconstruction algorithm. By studying and characterizing several of these components, we will quantify their influence on measurement accuracy and precision.

Impact

Our work will lead to new measurement standards and calibration techniques. Working closely with key industrial stakeholders and national bodies, this will enable industrial XCT users to apply these techniques more widely.

Project Partners

This work is done in close collaboration with several industrial partners such as the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and
Nikon Metrology Ltd
as well as the
Collaborative Computational Project in Tomographic Imaging (CCPi) and the University of Southampton’s Multidisciplinary, Multiscale, Microtomographic Volume Imaging lab (μ-Vis)

Funding

This work is supported by NPL and Nikon Metrology Ltd.

Magnification of uncertainties in x-ray projection due to x-ray source spot size
Magnification of uncertainties

Related research groups

Signal Processing and Control Group

Staff

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