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Research project

Deltaic Environments, Vulnerability and Climate Change: Migration as Adaptation (DECCMA)

Research areas:
Research funder:
International Development Research Centre (IDRC)
Status:
Not active

Project overview

DECCMA is a 4 year, IDRC-funded, CAD$13.5million programme of applied research on the adaptation options, limits and potential in deltaic environments to current weather variability and extremes, as well as climate change. The project ran from February 2014 to September 2018. Research focussed on four deltas – the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna (Bangladesh and India); the Nile (Egypt); the Volta (Ghana); and the Mahanadi (India). Large tracts of land at low elevation make deltas vulnerable to sea-level rise, but they also experience climate impacts such as droughts and fluvial flooding. Deltas have some of the highest population densities in the world with 500 million, often poor, residents. Key outputs all free to download:

Staff

Other researchers

Professor Steve Darby

Associate Dean Research

Research interests

  • River and coastal flooding - relationships between geomorphology and flooding in rivers and deltas
  • Biogeomorphology - interactions between river processes and life

Connect with Steve

Mr Chris Hill

Geodata Institute Manager

Connect with Chris

Professor Craig Hutton

Professor of Sustainability Science

Connect with Craig

Professor Emma Tompkins

Prof of Geog, Environment & Development

Connect with Emma

Collaborating research institutes, centres and groups

Research outputs

Emma Tompkins,
Katharine Vincent,
Natalie R Suckall,
Rezaur Rahman,
Tuhin Ghosh,
Adelina Mensah,
Kirk Anderson,
Alexander Chapman,
Sophie A. Day,
, 2020
Type: bookChapter
Natalie Suckall,
& Katharine Vincent
, 2019 , Environmental Science & Policy , 96 , 64--69
Type: article
Natalie Suckall,
& Katharine Vincent
, 2019 , Environmental Science & Policy , 96 , 64--69
Type: article
Natalie Suckall,
& Katharine Vincent
, 2019 , Environmental Science & Policy , 96 , 64--69
Type: article
Natalie Suckall,
& Katharine Vincent
, 2019 , Environmental Science & Policy , 96 , 64--69
Type: article
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