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The University of Southampton
Medicine

Research project: Reducing common infections in usual practice for recurrent respiratory tract infections: The RECUR Programme

Currently Active: 
Yes

This programme of research is designed to develop and test interventions to find out if they can reduce the frequency, severity and duration of respiratory infections (such as colds, sore throats, sinus, chest or ear infections, flu and COVID-19).  

Lay Summary

The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) has funded the RECUR Programme to develop and test interventions to find out if they can reduce the frequency, severity and duration of respiratory infections (such as colds, sore throats, sinus, chest or ear infections, flu and COVID-19). We have developed a website called Immune Defence which will help us to see if using nasal sprays, or getting more physically active and reducing stress, can help people get fewer of these types of infections. We have involved both a range of patients and patient representatives as collaborators in the design of our study to help ensure the interventions are relevant and appropriate to patients. 

Workstream 1 (intervention development): To develop an intervention to support the use of nasal sprays and physical activity/reducing stress to help people get fewer or less severe respiratory infections. Through ‘qualitative’ work, such as interviews with adults who have recurrent infections, we will look to understand the barriers that might prevent them from using nasal sprays or increasing their exercise and managing stress. We will also adapt existing interventions (developed for other conditions) to support adults getting more physically active and reducing stress for those considered to be more at risk of infection.

Workstream 2 (the Immune Defence study): To estimate the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of (a) nasal sprays and (b) brief physical activity and stress management, in preventing and reducing the incidence, severity and duration of respiratory infections (such as colds, sore throats, sinus, chest or ear infections, flu and COVID-19) among people at risk of infection in the COVID pandemic. To help us achieve these ends, we will randomly allocate study participants to receive one of the following four treatments:

a.       Brief advice (Usual Care)
b.       A liquid-based nasal spray
c.       A gel-based nasal spray
d.       Internet-based management to increase physical activity support getting more physically active and reducing stress

Workstream 3 (health economics): Recurring respiratory infections can cause distress to people and result in costs to society. In this workstream we will look at the health and social care costs of respiratory infections in order to estimate the cost-effectiveness of the treatments as part of the Immune Defence study.

Funder: NIHR Programme Grants for Applied Research (PGfAR)

Theme: Supporting self-management

Duration: 01/10/2019 – 30/09/2024    

Websitewww.southampton.ac.uk/idstudy

Contact: IDStudy@soton.ac.uk

Local Investigators:

Professor Paul Little: Co-Chief Investigator

Associate Professor Adam Geraghty: Co-Chief Investigator

Co-applicants:

Prof Lucy Yardley - University of Southampton / University of Bristol
Prof Alastair Hay - University of Bristol
Prof Christopher Butler - University of Oxford
Prof Michael Moore - University of Southampton
Prof Theo Verheij - University of Southampton
Mrs Samantha Richards-Hall - University of Southampton
Dr Beth Stuart - University of Southampton
Ms Sonia Newman - University of Southampton
Prof James Raftery - University of Southampton
Dr Ben Ainsworth - University of Bath
Dr Kat Bradbury - University of Southampton
Dr Shanaya Rathod - Southern Health NHS Foundation Trust
Professor Guiqing Lily Yao - University of Leicester

Study team:

Programme Manager: Kate Martinson

Academic Programme Manager: Dr Jane Vennik

Trial Manager: Samantha Williams

Trial Administrator: Charlotte Hookham

Related research groups

Primary Care, Population Sciences and Medical Education
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